thielges

thielges

Lives in United States San Jose, CA, United States
Has a website at http://www.thielges.com
Joined on Feb 24, 2004

Comments

Total: 38, showing: 21 – 38
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On article Landscape Photography Primer (97 comments in total)

Nice article Carsten. I especially like how you have structured this so there's something for everyone from the gear heads who are willing to invest in a lot of equipment to minimalists who what to travel light. Hopefully the fundamentalist commenters won't give you too much grief :-)

Link | Posted on Jan 20, 2012 at 01:45 UTC as 61st comment

Interesting to see that the 850 includes a GPS. I wonder whether Samsung has put any effort into fixing the problems of the WB650's 'mapview' mode or whether mapview is supported at all. mapview has a lot of potential if a few small kinks are worked out of the software.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2012 at 01:12 UTC as 9th comment
On article Introduction to Documentary-style People Photography (66 comments in total)

Thanks for this article Giora, I find this info useful. I have one question: it seems as if many shots are made without the permission of the subject. How do you handle situations when the subject has realized that they have been photographed and object. Possibly they want money or perhaps they want the photo deleted.

As for other questions regarding the model release here I believe that photojournalists are exempt.

Link | Posted on Dec 24, 2011 at 01:55 UTC as 36th comment
On article Buyer's Guide: Enthusiast raw-shooting compact cameras (283 comments in total)

This article should be subtitled "... and why you should shoot RAW". Great examples included here Barney ! The buyers of this class of camera are more likely to be on the fence regarding shooting RAW and you have provided a great resource to help decide which way to go.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2011 at 00:54 UTC as 86th comment | 5 replies

I think that the title should read "CMOS *Image Sensor* Inventor..." CMOS itself (as a platform for digital logic) was invented back in the 1960s by Frank Wanlass.

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2011 at 23:02 UTC as 31st comment | 18 replies
On article Introduction to Travel Photography (43 comments in total)

Thanks for the article Dave. Though not a pro I learned a few tips from this article.

For those who are interested in ideas for travel photography without the expense/weight/bulk of pro gear the key lies in quality small sensor equipment. The smaller the sensor the smaller the lens needed. There's a recent crop of products that can produce some amazing results from small packages. I've been experimenting with using a pair of digicams that allow low light shots from 24mm F1.8 all the way to 350mm (though not f1.8!). They share the same battery and charger so the entire kit (charger and all) is smaller and lighter than a basic enthusiast grade DSLR body. And cheaper to boot. Plus if one camera fails or is lost you've got a backup.

Though this rig can't quite compete with pro DSLRs in IQ it does get pretty darn close. And the small bulk and weight allows you to move a lot faster and farther possibly capturing images that would have been missed with a larger pro rig.

Link | Posted on Sep 29, 2011 at 06:46 UTC as 14th comment
In reply to:

Bob Meyer: The question I have, which this doesn't answer, is about private property that is effectively a public space, like the outdoor areas of a shopping center. Do rules for a "public space" apply, or rules for "private property"?

Thanks for the correction pL86. Since I live in CA myself I'd be interested in the which state laws apply to the shopping mall case you describe. So if you know where to look for that info please let us know, it might come in use.

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2011 at 19:41 UTC
In reply to:

thielges: Here's a tricky situation: As the ACLU guidelines clearly state you are free to shoot from public property but on private property the owner has the right to ask you to stop and/or leave. Sounds fair.

But what if it is unclear whether or not you're on public property? For example some publicly accessible roads are actually built upon private land. The public jurisdiction doesn't own the land but they have a legal easement to maintain a road across the private land. The public/private status of the land beneath the road can change every hundred feet or so and there is often no good way to recognize where the transitions are without consulting the property line maps (platt books) which are often secluded away on the city/county records office.

I was arrested once shooting from a publicly accessible road on these grounds. Though they released me shortly afterwards without charge it was really annoying to go through the detailed search while the best light of the day waned.

cplunk -Yes, most roads are built on a wide public Right of Way. However I have intimate knowledge of some public roads that lie atop private land in California. And in one case the property line runs to the center line of the road itself! So northbound traffic is on property X and southbound is on property Y.

Link | Posted on Sep 11, 2011 at 17:27 UTC
On article Photo Tip: Five for Five (111 comments in total)
In reply to:

Alex Notpro: I'd like some tips on how to organize a photo collection when you have 5x more photos laying around.

Hi Alex - I won't burden you with the complexities of my overwrought workflow but here are some basics that help me keep the volume under control. Basically I trim down images throughout the process from shutter to gallery. Here are the opportunities in order:

- Cut 'em off at the source: don't shoot something you know will be uninspiring. It is easy to be too caught up in the moment and forget that the artifact you produce isn't the scene but a 2D approximation of the scene. Restraint

- review in the field and delete bad images in-camera. It helps to have a sharp OLED screen for this

- I shoot multiples of the same subject for the reasons stated in Amadou's article plus simply as AF safety. In the PC, I'll review that set and kill all but the one or two best. I might even delete a perfect photo if there are other perfect specimens.

- Grade photos and select the best. Usually that's 1-2% for me. Keep the other 99% but file them out of the way.

-regrade ruthlessly b4 showing.

Link | Posted on Sep 11, 2011 at 17:13 UTC
On article Photo Tip: Five for Five (111 comments in total)

Thanks Amadou. Though some of the commenters here complain that this tip is too basic there are so many valuable basic tips that it makes sense to even seasoned photographers to review them periodically. I have a list of about twenty such basic tips that I refer to from time to time. Each is simple in its own but it is hard to keep all of them in mind all of the time. So sometimes I focus on one or two tips for a session and that helps it become an automatic reflex.

I think I'll focus on your 5of5 tip next. Keep 'em coming and and don't let the haters get you down.

Link | Posted on Sep 11, 2011 at 17:00 UTC as 21st comment
In reply to:

Bob Meyer: The question I have, which this doesn't answer, is about private property that is effectively a public space, like the outdoor areas of a shopping center. Do rules for a "public space" apply, or rules for "private property"?

private property.

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2011 at 20:10 UTC
In reply to:

thielges: Here's a tricky situation: As the ACLU guidelines clearly state you are free to shoot from public property but on private property the owner has the right to ask you to stop and/or leave. Sounds fair.

But what if it is unclear whether or not you're on public property? For example some publicly accessible roads are actually built upon private land. The public jurisdiction doesn't own the land but they have a legal easement to maintain a road across the private land. The public/private status of the land beneath the road can change every hundred feet or so and there is often no good way to recognize where the transitions are without consulting the property line maps (platt books) which are often secluded away on the city/county records office.

I was arrested once shooting from a publicly accessible road on these grounds. Though they released me shortly afterwards without charge it was really annoying to go through the detailed search while the best light of the day waned.

Octane - In my case the issue that the police pressed wasn't photography but rather trespassing. The officer who detained me said that I was observed shooting from a road that was partly on private land and that he could arrest me for trespassing. I guess it is OK to use the easement over private land for travel but if you stop and take photos then you're trespassing (?). The officer basically told me to scram and offered to follow me around and take me in to the station as soon as stopped on the (invisible) private part of the road.

I was tempted to visit the recorder's office the next day to study the platt maps to be on solid legal grounds then drop by the police station and give them the heads up so they didn't waste their or my time. But I was too lazy :-) Speaking of waste of time, a result of this incidentt allegedly registered me as a "person of interest" with Homeland Security.

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2011 at 16:38 UTC
In reply to:

smafdy: For all of the knee-jerk knuckleheads dissing the ACLU, they have defended your patron saint — Rush Limbaugh — on numerous occasions, and at no cost to the gigantic, bloviating, hate-filled windbag.

On a related note, does anyone else ever wonder why there are cameras on almost every light post nowadays, but virtually none in our courtrooms or in the meeting chambers or offices of our government officials?

smafdy - I'm not sure about your town but in mine those traffic light cameras are mainly in place to detect cars waiting for the stoplight. They are a substitute for the electromagnetic coils in the pavement for car detection. As far as I know the videostream from those cameras ends at an image processor in the cabinet on the curb. There the videostream is analyzed for use on controlling the traffic lights. I don't think that the videostream is sent onwards and/or recorded but you never know.

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2011 at 16:11 UTC
In reply to:

OnTheWeb: ACLU? American criminal liberal unit?

In any event, I'm looking forward to all the tall tales waiting to be unleashed in this thread.

I'm not understanding why you're using this article as a platform for political baiting. It would be more productive to discuss the content of the guide instead of the organization that published it.

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2011 at 21:29 UTC

Here's a tricky situation: As the ACLU guidelines clearly state you are free to shoot from public property but on private property the owner has the right to ask you to stop and/or leave. Sounds fair.

But what if it is unclear whether or not you're on public property? For example some publicly accessible roads are actually built upon private land. The public jurisdiction doesn't own the land but they have a legal easement to maintain a road across the private land. The public/private status of the land beneath the road can change every hundred feet or so and there is often no good way to recognize where the transitions are without consulting the property line maps (platt books) which are often secluded away on the city/county records office.

I was arrested once shooting from a publicly accessible road on these grounds. Though they released me shortly afterwards without charge it was really annoying to go through the detailed search while the best light of the day waned.

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2011 at 20:17 UTC as 29th comment | 6 replies
On photo Spin Broom in the Unpretentious challenge (2 comments in total)

Nice !

Link | Posted on Sep 5, 2011 at 07:27 UTC as 2nd comment
In reply to:

Peter Galbavy: If you're travelling then GPS is an excellent addition. Problem with the FT3 is that acquiring a lock takes ages and ages. Maybe this update will help.

Peter - can you quantify "ages and ages"? Normally a cold lock should take about two minutes and a warm lock a few seconds (depending on how long/far it has been since the last lock)

The cold lock time assumes that the camera is stationary with a clear sky view, i.e. not handheld. Locks take longer if you're holding the camera or of the sky view is obscured.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2011 at 19:11 UTC
On article Street Photographers test freedom to shoot in London (184 comments in total)
In reply to:

dgoakill: Kind of disappointed in this. I only watched the first few minutes of the video and the only street photography I saw was when a little girl sitting on a concrete bollard snapped a pic of the so called street photographer.

You don't use a tripod for street, and you don't use a zoom either. This is NOT street photography just because it was taken on the street. These people are using tripods and zooms to shoot BUILDINGS, not people.YOU ARE ASKING TO BE HARASSED when you conduct yourself in that manner in public. Your rights only go so far as not to infringe on another person. IF someone tells you to stop photographing them, YOU STOP! Period. In The USA, it is Illegal to shoot certain buildings and bridges. Laws have already been passed regarding this and are not subject to debate, it is a done deal.

This video and actions like this by wanna be street photographersgive street photography a bad name and makes it that much harder for the rest of us to pursue the genre.

dogakill writes: "In philadelphia you cannot take pictures on or around the Ben Franklin Bridge without a Permit"

Are you sure about that? It sounds ridiculous. I couldn't find any mention of such a photo permit requirement. But I did find thousands of photos of the bridge.

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2011 at 16:50 UTC
Total: 38, showing: 21 – 38
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