nologo

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Aug 24, 2009

Comments

Total: 38, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12Next ›Last »

As for the printing of other cameras files is concerned, there's definitely a trick to it. It's very fussy with the files it accepts. They must be unedited straight out of camera (files edited in Photoshop never work). It seems to always accept Fuji jpegs as well. It's not metadata related either. I've figured out a workflow with an iOS microSD card reader that consistently works but I wish there was Wifi on this thing.

As for people pining for a standard film based Instax square, I'm sure it will come, but I would guess it would be a bigger camera. They were able to achieve a small footprint because of the tiny sensor in this thing.

Lastly I think a big point missing from the review is that the cost of the film itself is significantly higher than Instax Wide or Mini. I like the format a lot more than the mini stuff so I'll have to suck it up, but it makes no sense that Instax Wide is cheaper per frame.

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2017 at 20:14 UTC as 18th comment | 1 reply
On article Sony a9: Why being better might not be enough (766 comments in total)
In reply to:

sirhawkeye64: They may pick up the higher-end market from Nikon and Canon, but I don't think Sony will really ever win over the hobbyist market. At many of my photography events, I still see people with newer cameras (that just got them) and very few (if any) have gotten a Sony a99 or a77, A77R, etc. Most of them have picked up either a Nikon or Canon, and those that do get the Sony, are getting the a6300 or a6500 (or a6000 if they're on a tight budget). So, yes, I think the A9 has a place, and they may be able to pry a way some photographers, but I would think that for most pro photographers, unless they're just jumping in at the pro level, they may even be hard to convince to switch even after investing thousands of dollars on glass and another few thousand on a body, because resale, even though pro lenses tend to hold their value (Nikon or Canon), there is a lways a loss somewhere. And then there's the investment cost to get started with Sony.

"They may pick up the higher-end market from Nikon and Canon, but I don't think Sony will really ever win over the hobbyist market."

What? I think the exact opposite. That it would be harder for Sony to break through the professionals for the reasons state above. But most 'hobbyists' don't really need a 400mm f/2.8 lens. The A6x00 series seems to be doing very well competing toe to toe with the Rebels and the Nikon DX000's. And the advanced enthusiasts seem to take well to the A7 series. Sony is certainly addressing the needs of these customers more pointedly than Canon or Nikon is.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2017 at 20:49 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2726 comments in total)
In reply to:

contadorfan: Re a7 menu diving: what functions are users frequently diving for that is the basis of the menu diving complaint? What's buried in the menus that you need often? Can't these functions be assigned to a button or customized setting or screen menu for quick access? I've not shot with an a7 series camera. But my Sony a77ii seems so flexible re putting functions where I need them when I need them, that I wonder if the a7 menu diving complaint is due to true lack of accessibility or merely due to unfamiliarity with the camera customizations.

OT to the A9 perhaps, but seems like some are dismissing the a9 because of their experience with the a7 cameras. Hence, my curiosity...

@contadorfan You also can't really rely on the Memory 1/2/3 settings because you want to be in the dedicated "video" mode on the mode dial when shooting video.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2017 at 01:51 UTC
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2726 comments in total)
In reply to:

contadorfan: Re a7 menu diving: what functions are users frequently diving for that is the basis of the menu diving complaint? What's buried in the menus that you need often? Can't these functions be assigned to a button or customized setting or screen menu for quick access? I've not shot with an a7 series camera. But my Sony a77ii seems so flexible re putting functions where I need them when I need them, that I wonder if the a7 menu diving complaint is due to true lack of accessibility or merely due to unfamiliarity with the camera customizations.

OT to the A9 perhaps, but seems like some are dismissing the a9 because of their experience with the a7 cameras. Hence, my curiosity...

There are a few but one springs to mind immediately for video users of A7 bodies:

You can't bind APS-C image capture to a function button. This is only accessible via the menus This is especially important as many cinema lenses are Super35 (aka APS-C sized) and requires a menu dive if you're changing between native E-Mount and non-native cinema lenses. You can imagine how cumbersome this would get, especially since it's buried in a non obvious place in the menus.

This feature is of course handy as well if you want to do a quick pickup shot and get a tighter field of view without having to change the lens.

The questioning of "what do you even use the menus for" is legit, but if you do have a specific case like this where you regularly have to dive into a menu or two, it really shows how bad Sony is at menu design.

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2017 at 20:34 UTC

I'm a little sad this doesn't have Wifi and uses a microSD card. I was hoping to use this like the Instax Share (SP-1 or SP-2) but it seems like it will be cumbersome. I'm sure at the price range the digital aspect of the camera won't be very good.

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 22:01 UTC as 8th comment
In reply to:

Marty4650: A nice toy for anyone who feels $1.70 per print for 3 inch square prints is a good idea.

And you better hope for a 100% keeper rate, or it could get a lot more expensive.

@Marty4650, being that this is a digital camera, I'm sure you'll be able to specify to print only the photos you want.

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 21:59 UTC
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S vs Pentax 645Z vs Hasselblad X1D (348 comments in total)
In reply to:

nologo: One thing I don't hear mentioned a lot is the Hasselblad X1D will have issues adapting other formats to the camera since the camera doesn't have a built-in shutter. Definitely something worth thinking about as a system.

True but the adapters will have to be able to interface with the leaf shutters, which is not trivial.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2017 at 18:48 UTC
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S vs Pentax 645Z vs Hasselblad X1D (348 comments in total)

One thing I don't hear mentioned a lot is the Hasselblad X1D will have issues adapting other formats to the camera since the camera doesn't have a built-in shutter. Definitely something worth thinking about as a system.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2017 at 18:08 UTC as 38th comment | 3 replies
On article Juggling with one hand: Leica M10 shooting experience (497 comments in total)
In reply to:

munro harrap: My remembered experience from long ago with MMs. They were a part of me, and I hated the tunnel vision, and the blinkered vision you get on an SLR, hated it and could not cope for years.

BUT, in poor light you use the M rangefinder which is one square at the centre of the M's viewfinder, and you nail focus where you need it every time. Zone focus is for sunlit conditions: "f8 and be there".

You simply choose an aperture and set its distant aperture marking to coincide with the infinity mark on the lens barrel. Then everything is sharp from infinity all the way in to where the near aperture mark shows on the nearer distance part of the scale on the lens barrel, and as long as the light is good enough and you dont go too close (I think a 35mm lens gets you 10ft to infinity at f8), you need not focus again.

Thus the Leica IS the best and fastest camera in use, no autofocussing delay, and a clear view of reality as it is.

@Tonio except manually focusing most AF cameras doesn't have a focus aid as good as a rangefinder does. Focus peaking is the closest anyone has gotten, but still has situations where rangefinders do better (any wide angle lens can be tricky with peaking)

Link | Posted on Mar 15, 2017 at 02:28 UTC
On article Juggling with one hand: Leica M10 shooting experience (497 comments in total)
In reply to:

nologo: One major thing the author misses is the fact that with practice, one can get quite a bit faster with rangefinder focusing.

Also, with a prime lens, you start being able to see the focal length without looking through the viewfinder.

Essentially, over time, you get used to focusing "by feel" and just making minor focus adjustments when the viewfinder is actually up your eye. And the framing is already what you expect, with minor adjustments, as well. Learning to be really effective with a rangefinder doesn't necessarily come automatically with one trip, it can take a while to get the practice right, but can be quite rewarding. I find I can focus a rangefinder, for instance, as long as I can still see, which is a light level that moist autofocus systems start struggling (but that modern sensors can still capture a very usable image).

While zone focusing is indeed the absolute fastest, I don't personally shoot this way, as focusing with the rangefinder is fast enough, with practice.

This is true, and I'll definitely concede your point here, and was being unfair. But there is an important distinction here. When I miss something on a rangefinder, it's because of a lack on my part. When an autofocus camera misses focus, it's because a sensor and algorithm miscalculated the contrast of a specific area as being what I wanted in focus.

I find it infinitely more frustrating to think I nailed something that was off because an AF sensor missed it. I'd rather spend the time it takes to practice. This is also why so much time is spent reviewing the quality and speed of modern AF systems - because they are by and large your only reliable way to focus quickly and effectively. But a rangefinder proposes a different way of working, one that requires more of the user, especially with time.

And this is what many reviews don't take the time to do - longer term reviews to see if something really works if you invest not only time, but money. Many times the expectation is it must work as you think it should within a short review period, which doesn't really often reflect what a real user will encounter with the product. Some are willing to grow with a camera if they feel it is a worthwhile endeavour.

That being said, I don't think a rangefinder is right for everyone, and I'm sure many will think it's not worth the practice. But I do.

Link | Posted on Mar 15, 2017 at 02:20 UTC
On article Juggling with one hand: Leica M10 shooting experience (497 comments in total)

One major thing the author misses is the fact that with practice, one can get quite a bit faster with rangefinder focusing.

Also, with a prime lens, you start being able to see the focal length without looking through the viewfinder.

Essentially, over time, you get used to focusing "by feel" and just making minor focus adjustments when the viewfinder is actually up your eye. And the framing is already what you expect, with minor adjustments, as well. Learning to be really effective with a rangefinder doesn't necessarily come automatically with one trip, it can take a while to get the practice right, but can be quite rewarding. I find I can focus a rangefinder, for instance, as long as I can still see, which is a light level that moist autofocus systems start struggling (but that modern sensors can still capture a very usable image).

While zone focusing is indeed the absolute fastest, I don't personally shoot this way, as focusing with the rangefinder is fast enough, with practice.

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2017 at 14:00 UTC as 132nd comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

proxy: $2500 (tops) for outdated camera and $6500 for a centrally placed red, high visibility LEICA LOGO. No more then that. Actually, it's great it can shoot pictures . Generally, it would suffice to just carry it around... and occasionally take a picture to show it's not a dummy. Just legends of incredible, out of this world performance and no reliable database of test results of Leica lenses. Are they any good? Probably... but how can you tell? "Take my word for it". Also keep in mind Leica lenses are mechanically and electronically (none) simplest designs, as advanced as they were 40 years ago. I bet Zeiss beats Leica in every department for less or much less then half the price.

The arbitrary price policing of Leica products always comes out with every Leica product.

$2500 doesn't get you a compact, full frame, weather sealed camera with a sensor that shoots ISO 50,000, optical and digital viewfinders, and has a portfolio of over 100 compact, high performance lenses. The only mirrorless competition is the A7 series, which as an overall system is significantly larger (because of the lenses) and has a very slim lens lineup (because rangefinder lenses don't work well on this body). Every other mirrorless has a smaller sensor. If you step up to SLR's, the weight of the overall system is significantly higher.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2017 at 01:49 UTC
In reply to:

AZPhotog86: $6,500 is way too much for any camera--including Leicas.

The Nikon D4 and the 1DX Mk II are both cameras in the $6000 range. Most medium format cameras are much higher. Do you think these cameras shouldn't exist and are too expensive? Or do they just do something that you don't need?

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2017 at 01:41 UTC
In reply to:

Rick Knepper: I used to covet Leica lenses, their over-priced cameras not so much. I've adapted a few R series lenses to my Canons and at that time, they produced better IQ then similar Canon primes. I would have bought into Leica if they had priced their camera to sell lenses. Nowadays, great lenses are a dime a dozen, have AF and are much cheaper than Leica. Lost opportunity times 1000s I would suspect.

While you're right that Canon, Nikon, Zeiss, and Sigma have all been releasing some excellent lenses as of late, no one is competing in exactly the same space that Leica is, which is the highest possible performance, coupled with compact size and light weight.

Leica seems to have the design constraint to make M lenses with the smallest and fewest lens elements possible, while still performing as good as, if not better than the competitors. Some argue about that the 35L or Otus lenses may give Leica's performance a run for it's money, but if size and weight are considered, most systems don't really compete directly here.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2017 at 01:38 UTC
In reply to:

IlyaA: Leica M will be good if they will start using Sony's sensors.

To be fair, comparing the sensors is important. The M240's sensor obviously doesn't compare in low light with the latest Sony sensors but it works far better with rangefinder glass than any of the Sony A7 bodies, even with modified sensors.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2017 at 01:30 UTC
In reply to:

Achiron: "the battery and SD card status bars are now color-coded – from green to yellow to red – to give users an idea of remaining capacity."

What is this status bar? Just some LED indicator? does this mean the UI on the LCD doesn't show how many more pictures you can take and no battery level indicator, or they exist and untill now that status bar was just red and meant... nothing? Can anyone give some background abot this particular thing?

Firmware 1.0.2.0 - In the info panel, there were two status bars, one for battery life, the other for SD card capacity. They were both green, and the main indication of how full or empty they were was a percentage of how far the bar was filled up

Firmware 1.3.4.0 - these same bars exist, but the green bars now change color according to how full they are, as well as deplete in percentage.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2017 at 01:26 UTC
In reply to:

aramgrg: I don't believe most Leica owners know what firmware is, let alone update.

Putting down "most owners" of anything is hardly productive. Could you say that Canon SLR users are smarter than Nikon owners? Fuji users better with their money than SOny? Could it just be that their products fill a specific need for the user that doesn't fill yours?

Link | Posted on Feb 15, 2017 at 23:38 UTC

Compare and contrast this to firmware update to other manufacturers, though. We have a 1D-X firmware update that fixes an icon, a number variable, and an issue with USB.

Leica here is adding features, tweaking the way that the camera is operated, and improving performance of the camera.

Easy to criticize because of the cost, but they clearly make capable cameras and show that they can respond to their actual users feedback.

Link | Posted on Feb 15, 2017 at 23:33 UTC as 21st comment
In reply to:

Bershatsky: The Leica system fascinates me, but the prices!!! I've been looking at the 262 MD, and then once you add a lens - ridiculous!!!

So, instead I bought another Loxia lens today. Are Leica lenses better? Is a 262 better than an A7R II combined with the Loxia? One thing is for sure, the Sony is a lot cheaper and with its manual focus assist, I believe I'll get more keepers. Also, I really like EVFs.

Maybe one day, Leica prices will come down or I'll not be so price sensitive.

One more thing I don't particularly like about the loxias - their very long focus throw. Better for video, but I find it much harder to use for stills.

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2016 at 21:44 UTC
In reply to:

Bershatsky: The Leica system fascinates me, but the prices!!! I've been looking at the 262 MD, and then once you add a lens - ridiculous!!!

So, instead I bought another Loxia lens today. Are Leica lenses better? Is a 262 better than an A7R II combined with the Loxia? One thing is for sure, the Sony is a lot cheaper and with its manual focus assist, I believe I'll get more keepers. Also, I really like EVFs.

Maybe one day, Leica prices will come down or I'll not be so price sensitive.

Yes, leica lenses are better. Are they worth the price? Up to you. However if price is the stumbling block, both modern Zeiss and Voigtlander M-Mount options are available and make it a much more viable option. Keep in mind too the mount has been around forever, so lots of older options too.

As for 'keeper' rate - I've used a loxia on an A7 vs an M Mount lens on a leica rangefinder. Pros and cons for both, but I believe the bright viewfinder and precise focusing (with a well adjusted rangefinder) actually lend itself to a higher keeper rate than an EVF with peaking. It's very easy to extremely precise with say, a wider lens with wider depth of field because rangefinder focus is quite "binary." - it's either on or off. Both takes practice but I definitely think the rangefinder is better, so long as you're in the 28-75mm range. I also love that I can see 'outside" my composition. The EVF is more flexible and can show you exact DOF and composition. Both are excellent, try them both!

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2016 at 21:43 UTC
Total: 38, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12Next ›Last »