jeffcpix

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Aug 12, 2005

Comments

Total: 42, showing: 1 – 20
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The camera owner should have given the monkey a banana -- then it would have been 'work-for-hire'.

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2017 at 06:29 UTC as 72nd comment

They're not real; "Water was taken from 100 different water sources in Taiwan and turned into frozen toxic popsicles before Hung I-chen, Guo Yi-hui, and Cheng Yu-ti from the National Taiwan University of Arts recreated them using transparent polyester resin."
Much easier shooting resin-pops than ice-pops.
Sewer water is gross -- no surprise.

Link | Posted on Jun 11, 2017 at 06:47 UTC as 2nd comment
On article Alpha-better: Sony a9 versus a7R II (503 comments in total)
In reply to:

hatem95: I am a Sony fan, and I owned 4 previous mirrorless Sony's and I will get the A9 but please stop this media hype. A9 may have super AF, etc.... but the form factor is incompatible with using it as a sports camera in the field. A sports camera needs Sports lenses and these lenses are Huge , I have totally abandoned using my Sony 80-400 with the A7rII not because of AF issues but because it feels very awkward and imbalanced in my hand. if Sony is that clever they should design a small superfast sports lenses to match. otherwise, the A9 is not a sports camera

The ergonomic problem I have with the a7 series (and probably the a9) is that when I take hold of the grip, my fingers aren't fully wrapped around the grip. I can't extend them because there's so little space between the grip and the barrel of the lens. And it doesn't matter whether I'm tripod mounted or not -- holding the camera so my finger falls over the shutter release becomes painful quite quickly. When not on a tripod, most of the weight is taken by my left hand placed under the lens -- but I still like to keep a firm grip on the body.
Maybe the grip extenders will help -- but from the looks of them, they don't
make the grip 'chunk-ier' ... just a bit longer.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 10:42 UTC

I am the only one who thinks that the A7/A9 bodies are too small (even with the grip) to be comfortable for long shoots? I want a body I can get a good hold on -- not one that's so small I have to hold it with my fingertips. Awful ergonomics for me. And if Sony is going to force EVFs on us, why not make 'em bigger -- like the Nikon F Sports/Action finder? Better still -- now that the pentaprism is a gone -- how about interchangeable viewfinders like the ones made for the Pentax LX?

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2017 at 11:44 UTC as 225th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

jeffcpix: I've been shooting with it for 9 years. Yes, it's big and heavy (more so with the grip and a 70-400 or any of the CZ lenses) -- but that's what I like about it... so comfortable to hold. But for the a99 every Sony body produced seems designed for small hands. I shoot stills -- no video is OK with me. I have aquired a full set of A mount lenses at bargain prices when everyone thought A mount was dead including the 16mm 2.8 FF fisheye, 500mm AF, 17-35 G (replaced with the CZ 16-35 Z2) and both macros. No Live View or EVF -- fine,.. great battery life. And the OVF is outstanding. Yes, I wish it had a hinged LCD. Yes, I wish I could adapt the Canon 17TS to it but check out Leitax for all the great glass that can be adapted. Wish it had 'mirror lock up' but at least no SLT. The RAW files I get are as good as I need and the 24MP has turned out to be the sweet spot in terms of needed processing power. Bayer filter -- no moire surprises. It was a great camera in 2008 -- and still is.

Ralf's correct. I never scrolled down the drive menu
far enough to find the mirror-up function.

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2017 at 10:32 UTC
In reply to:

jeffcpix: I've been shooting with it for 9 years. Yes, it's big and heavy (more so with the grip and a 70-400 or any of the CZ lenses) -- but that's what I like about it... so comfortable to hold. But for the a99 every Sony body produced seems designed for small hands. I shoot stills -- no video is OK with me. I have aquired a full set of A mount lenses at bargain prices when everyone thought A mount was dead including the 16mm 2.8 FF fisheye, 500mm AF, 17-35 G (replaced with the CZ 16-35 Z2) and both macros. No Live View or EVF -- fine,.. great battery life. And the OVF is outstanding. Yes, I wish it had a hinged LCD. Yes, I wish I could adapt the Canon 17TS to it but check out Leitax for all the great glass that can be adapted. Wish it had 'mirror lock up' but at least no SLT. The RAW files I get are as good as I need and the 24MP has turned out to be the sweet spot in terms of needed processing power. Bayer filter -- no moire surprises. It was a great camera in 2008 -- and still is.

Thanks Ralf, are you referring to the 10sec timer setting?

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2017 at 17:26 UTC

I've been shooting with it for 9 years. Yes, it's big and heavy (more so with the grip and a 70-400 or any of the CZ lenses) -- but that's what I like about it... so comfortable to hold. But for the a99 every Sony body produced seems designed for small hands. I shoot stills -- no video is OK with me. I have aquired a full set of A mount lenses at bargain prices when everyone thought A mount was dead including the 16mm 2.8 FF fisheye, 500mm AF, 17-35 G (replaced with the CZ 16-35 Z2) and both macros. No Live View or EVF -- fine,.. great battery life. And the OVF is outstanding. Yes, I wish it had a hinged LCD. Yes, I wish I could adapt the Canon 17TS to it but check out Leitax for all the great glass that can be adapted. Wish it had 'mirror lock up' but at least no SLT. The RAW files I get are as good as I need and the 24MP has turned out to be the sweet spot in terms of needed processing power. Bayer filter -- no moire surprises. It was a great camera in 2008 -- and still is.

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2017 at 12:47 UTC as 77th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

skanter: Outside of their pay scale - The NY Times remains the preeminent newspaper in the US. Right wingers confuse editorial content with news. The sheer volume of research and clarity of writing in their news stories and features is peerless. It has always been an invaluable resource for those who actually read and think, and remains so.

Those without critical thinking and reading ability watch Fox News on TV.

Aaron801 Wrote:
"I don't really disagree with you about the more popular right wing media outlets being more about opinion than fact"

Watch MSNBC or CNN -- then watch Fox Business News (FBN). The former are filled with shrill hysterical mud slingers -- the latter, measured, good humored
reporting. The king of opinionated misrepresentation is MSNBC's garrulous Chris Matthews followed by Chris Hayes and the insufferable Rachel Maddow. As for the quality of writing in the NYT, it was dumbed down about 40 years ago to accommodate the diminished capacity of those educated by the US public school system and who prefer 1 picture to a 1000 words. As for FoxNews -- it's not about news at all -- just entertainment and eye candy.

Link | Posted on Apr 6, 2017 at 11:00 UTC
In reply to:

Alex Permit: Website quotes Color Rendering Index ≥96, but what about R9? Whether your shooting a model or shooting food, CRI is not the whole story.

Thanks for mentioning R9

http://www.leapfroglighting.com/why-the-led-r9-value-isnt-important/

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2017 at 11:44 UTC

Wow, she sure worked hard on her lighting -- such subtlety! And
the poses -- INSPIRED!!! I wonder how much time was spent deciding
on whether to use make-up or shoot them au natural? How about those backgrounds -- she must have spent weeks doing location scouting. And the
camera positions -- view camera dropped front from phtotgrapher eye-level? I haven't seen such beautifully bored expressions since Diane Arbus.
My, my -- what sophisticated aesthetic judgments. The jury must have had a such a difficult time reaching it's decision given the chairman's underlying concept:
"At a moment when the portrait image dissipates itself in an economy of narcissism and fractal celebrity, Rineke Dijkstra reminds us of the photographic portrait’s public potential,’ said Duncan Forbes, Chair of the Jury."
Yup -- economy of narcissism and fractal celebrity -- that's what we're all about.
But wait "Rineke Dijkstra pursues an existential photography," -- maybe that's
what my images are lacking

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2017 at 12:09 UTC as 85th comment | 1 reply
On article Throwback Thursday: Minolta's prosumer DiMAGE 7 (209 comments in total)

The A2 was the last and best version. Two auxilliary lenses were available a tele which gave 300mm at 2,8 and a wide which was about 21mm -- both were big, heavy and inconvenient -- but they were the best aux lenses I've ever used. If Sony were to re-issue this camera with the latest/greatest sensor, OLED EVF and RAW+jpg I'd be interested. Unfortunately 'the mind of Minolta' didn't seem to be part of the Sony organization's inheritance -- groundbreaking designs like the Minolta Spot Meters, Color Temp Meter and Beseler/Minota 45A were abandoned. People forget that before Sony teamed up with Zeiss, Minolta had a fruitful relationship with Leica.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2017 at 12:27 UTC as 33rd comment | 1 reply

The Turtleback was an interesting idea -- but Sony did it right with the Sony Alpha QX1

Link | Posted on Jan 26, 2017 at 11:21 UTC as 21st comment

"They brought graduate students on board and acquired more and more lenses—not an easy task, at $12,000 a pop—eventually gathering 48 of them"

Too bad they didn't buy them from Amazon and saved $2K each.
Maybe they got a grant -- so keep an eye out for them at the government
surplus auctions. It's only tax-payer money -- plenty more where that came from.

Link | Posted on Oct 26, 2016 at 11:10 UTC as 49th comment | 5 replies

There's only one thing cooler than being a photographer and that is being a designer -- which is only one step less cool than being an artist.

Link | Posted on Oct 14, 2016 at 09:24 UTC as 26th comment
In reply to:

Autriche78: This delay highlights one issue, which is the insane degree of inter-dependence that ensues from single-source manufacturing. When ONE facility going offline for whatever reasons can cause these kinds of disruptions across a large sector of ANY industry ( Fuji is raising their prices as a result the same event, supposedly ) , that should be a warning to us that globalization isn't all it's cracked up to be. I hope for all our sakes that pharmaceutical companies that produce life-saving medications don't have similar reliance on single production facilities. And if they do, that they have more brains than to situate them someplace where earthquakes and natural disasters are a frequent occurrence.

This reminds me a bit of a different problem, beach erosion, and of the folks who keep building houses as close as possible to the oceanfront and then complain because they can't get homeowner's insurance.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/20/health/policy/20drug.html?_r=0

"Dr. Yusuf K. Hamied, chairman of Cipla, one of the world’s most important suppliers of pharmaceutical ingredients, says his company and others have grown increasingly dependent on Chinese suppliers. “If tomorrow China stopped supplying pharmaceutical ingredients, the worldwide pharmaceutical industry would collapse,” he said."

Link | Posted on Aug 31, 2016 at 16:10 UTC
On article Photoshop CC 2015.5.1 available (89 comments in total)

Still no history brush for 16bit

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2016 at 05:43 UTC as 13th comment
In reply to:

Gatoraied: I had my own darkroom back in the early 60's and worked as a commercial photographer. I sent all color work to Rochester and only did my B&W's. Film was 35mm, 620, 120. Did lots of dodging and burning which worked quite nicely. When seeing Adams' multi light & toggled enlarger/projector light array I thought " Ahhh, thats how he did it!". Of course never using 8x10 negatives the thought never crossed my mind but it was brilliant!. For years many of us in the business knew Adams manipulated his photographs but could never quite nail down how it was done. Of course anyone who worked photography knew getting Adams kind of exposures were next to impossible and just thought he performed some magic in the darkroom but never realized that using that toggled lighting was one of his creations. Interesting to know the rest of the story. BTW, I wonder if National Geographic will purge all of Adams' photos from their archives?

The preferred lightsource for 4x5 and smaller was the Ferrante Codelite head. As for his darkroom, it was far from being state of the art for the time; rather, it was more of an upgrade from what was available to commercial labs in the 40's. Hard to believe he opted for a magnetic wall rather than a vacuum easel but he wasn't making murals as big as the commerical labs. The grain focusing device he was using is now called the Peak Critical Enlarging Focuser and is still available at BH. And temperature control wasn't a problem -- anyone doing serious work had thermostatic mixing valves. Similarly, the Thomas Duplex Sodium Vapor Safelight was preferable to those Kodak drop-lights. Before you get all sentimental over his prints, take a look at the work of others who worked in platinum -- or in dye transfer for color. AA's work was crisp -- but there was a whole 'nother aesthetic which eschewed this. AA made fine prints, but so did many, many others.

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2016 at 11:10 UTC
On photo Streets of Burano in the Streets #3 : Streets in colour challenge (4 comments in total)

If you're going to go overboard in post (or strength of creative filter), why not have the sky match its reflection in the water? It's easy, use Nik Viveza, put grouped control points in the sky and bring the brightness down. Try it -- you'll like it. When faking color and saturation, at least be consistent.

Link | Posted on May 31, 2016 at 09:38 UTC as 1st comment
On article Striking: Photos from a lightning hotspot in Venezuela (34 comments in total)

I don't know how reliable the Weather Channel is

https://weather.com/safety/thunderstorms/news/lightning-strikes-around-the-world

but they have this: "Studies have shown that Florida is the state where you're most likely to get struck by lightning, but there are places elsewhere in the world where lightning flashes even more often."

There's been quite a lot of lightning the past two nights -- flashes every 2-4 seconds for 30 minutes -- mostly seem concentrated around Mara del Lago. Maybe it's nature abhoring a vacuum.

Link | Posted on May 24, 2016 at 12:08 UTC as 5th comment

In situ copying of 'masterpieces' -- ridiculous.
I wonder who retouches the off color specular
reflections of the ambient light? Too bad the
camera doesn't generate a color patch which
could be used to calibrate the viewing device for
accurate rendering of colors and contrast.

If this

https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/u/0/asset-viewer/apple-harvest/GgEtbnL6cNOmjg?projectId=art-camera

is the best they've got, I'm not impressed.
And does Google own the copyright on the digital version?
Check out this from the museum at Cornell University

http://museum.cornell.edu/rights-reproductions

Link | Posted on May 19, 2016 at 11:05 UTC as 12th comment | 1 reply
Total: 42, showing: 1 – 20
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