Paul Grupp

Paul Grupp

Lives in United States Portland, OR, United States
Works as a Full-time professional photographer
Has a website at http://gruppandrose.com
Joined on Oct 28, 2002
About me:

I've shot just about everything, and am hungry for more!

Comments

Total: 22, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Paul Grupp: 90% report losing most bookings, but only 19% think their career is over?

I think most photographers are not understanding the probable impact of this situation. 19% or more exit the business in the best of times; and this is looking like the worst of times since the great depression.

My prediction? At least 75% of people self-identifying as professional photogs will exit the biz this year.

Grubernd - and wouldn’t it be great if Covid-19 only killed criminals and bad people? But unfortunately, that’s not the case. And it won’t be so with photographer casualties either. This situation will cut down the good and bad indiscriminately. In fact, it could be argued that the “weekend warriors” will survive easier than the full time pros, since they can rely on their real job to see them through.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2020 at 11:45 UTC

90% report losing most bookings, but only 19% think their career is over?

I think most photographers are not understanding the probable impact of this situation. 19% or more exit the business in the best of times; and this is looking like the worst of times since the great depression.

My prediction? At least 75% of people self-identifying as professional photogs will exit the biz this year.

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2020 at 04:48 UTC as 29th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Clyde Thomas: If "freelancers are increasingly used"... then isn't that a rise in photography career?

So salaried togs are losing out to freelance togs?

Also, weird, with only a handful of pro grade camera makers available, it seems like that represents fewer pro photographers. But B&H has 19 different brands of studio strobe lighting equipment in one category... Not counting peripheral meters and backdrop gear. Too many different brands to count for LED lighting. More than a dozen different drone brands in one category.

Who's buying all this stuff if photographers are doing poorly and make low salaries?

The people buying this stuff are dabblers with other jobs who then compete with those of us depending on photography as our only source of income. For each of us fulltime pros, there are a thousand guys willing to work for nearly nothing so they can make a few thousand per year to buy new toys, and have the fun and prestige of calling themselves pro photographers.

Absolutely nothing wrong with that, but it is a major contributor to the deterioration of photography as a viable career.

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2019 at 03:16 UTC
On article Nikon Z6 is a lower resolution, less expensive Z7 (402 comments in total)
In reply to:

Arsen: I own the D850 and love it along with top notch Nikkor Lens. I have been waiting for this camera for a while. I didn't want to go to sony because I have the A6000 , bought it for a small travel camera several years ago, I hated the IQ , Menue and autofocus.. At that time I had the D800E and no comparison. The z6 would be the perfect camera for my needs with 24-70 F4 Kit lens on days I don't want to carry the D850. I have been looking for a light travel camera and I think Nikon hit all the right boxes for me. Personally I don't care if it only has 1 card.. I love the XQD cards, super fast and reliable.. I never use the SD card on my D850.. I am also excited with the video features of the z6.. if the Z7 wasn't so expensive, I would consider it. I will wait for some full reviews then place my order.

I feel that judging Sony based on your experience with an ancient camera is like judging Nikon on the basis of your experience with the D40.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2018 at 15:04 UTC
On article Nikon Z6 is a lower resolution, less expensive Z7 (402 comments in total)

And yet the Gh5 and Gh5s have no limit on video recording time.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2018 at 15:02 UTC as 57th comment | 1 reply
On article Nikon Z6 is a lower resolution, less expensive Z7 (402 comments in total)

Time limit for video recording?

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2018 at 05:30 UTC as 110th comment | 2 replies

This is hardly news. Since the 1960's, many pro Nikon shooters routinely eschew the high-priced "professional" F series and bought cheaper Nikkormats instead. When the F3 was king, plenty chose the delightful FE2 instead. When the F4 and F5 were the kings of the pro gear world, the F100 was the choice of many savvy pros. And so it goes right up to today.

There is a limit to how low you should go though. These examples were all capable cameras at bargain prices. Many of today's bargain consumer DSLRs have tiny viewfinders, small buffers slow to empty, inadequate af speed and accuracy, poor ergo of and so forth. Yes, you can still make great photos on thse cameras, but make even better photos on a more capable box.

Link | Posted on Jul 4, 2017 at 19:49 UTC as 13th comment | 2 replies
On article Ask the staff: wedding season weirdness (277 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mariano Pacifico: Who needs weeding photographer every got cameras from cellcams to P&S.

Who needs restaurants? Everybody has a kitchen at home!

Link | Posted on Jul 2, 2017 at 23:44 UTC
On article New Sony a9 firmware fixes overheating warning (76 comments in total)
In reply to:

jay jay02: The only way to stop a camera overheating is to build it correctly in the first place. How come this only happens to Sony? because they have crammed too much electronic Junk into a tiny badly ventilated body. So what have they done? either reduced processing power or modified the software so that the warning notification is set at a higher temperature. They haven't fixed the design issue and the camera will still get very hot in certain situations.

And this strongly stated opinion is based on exactly what emperical evidence? Can you back up any of your assertions with any evidence at all?

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2017 at 14:54 UTC
On article How do you know you need a new camera? (402 comments in total)
In reply to:

rev32: Does anyone have suggestions on how to reattach the covering on a Nikon?No offense Mr. Rose but I don't want to use tape on my camera. But maybe that adds something to the mystique of being the photographer, and makes one look like a seasoned professional?

If you and your clients are happy who are we to complain or judge?

Yeah, I probably have shot less than 500 jpgs in my entire life, and I have something like 375,000 delivered images in my Zenfolio client pages. I know I have had cameras that were never once set to any of the jpg modes. And I can typically guess exposure correctly to around a stop, but I still see a benefit in getting the RAW as close to perfect as possible.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 18:44 UTC
On article How do you know you need a new camera? (402 comments in total)
In reply to:

rev32: Does anyone have suggestions on how to reattach the covering on a Nikon?No offense Mr. Rose but I don't want to use tape on my camera. But maybe that adds something to the mystique of being the photographer, and makes one look like a seasoned professional?

If you and your clients are happy who are we to complain or judge?

To me, there has always been something wonky with the D800 and D810 LCD panel. I find them to have a green cast, and IMHO, to be highly unreliable for judging image attributes compared to almost anything else I've ever used (which is a lot). Many have told me I'm nuts, so no need to jump on that bandwagon, but I actually returned a D810 because I expected it to be better, and it had exactly the same LCD panel issues the D800 had. It's as though a completely different engineering team designed that camera. For a lot of people, even if they see the same thing I do, it doesn't matter. But for an event shooter like myself who does a lot of work where you don't get an opportunity to reshoot, a reliable LCD that accurately reflects what I will see on my computer screen when I get back to the studio is a must. Again -- this is a very polarizing issue -- I've had quite a few people say they know exactly what I'm talking about and agree, and a larger number telling me I'm an idiot.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 18:13 UTC
On article How do you know you need a new camera? (402 comments in total)
In reply to:

ZeBebito: Excellent article Carey. I don't know, but if you need/want an upgrade to an already great camera like the D700, the D750 would be a logical step followed by a D810. Personally, my "upgrades" have been more based on a simple desire to change gear and try new things rather than technical aspects.

A recent thread on this forum suggests that the D750 does better in the ISO 800-range, but the gap closes as you go above that. My experience shooting 40+ weddings per year with both cameras bears that out. The D750 is a hair better in low light, but not enough to really make a practical difference. On the other hand, the D500 AF performance and feature set completely blows the D750 out of the water. Not even close.

But of course, the noise performance in a full-frame D500 would be completely different. Unless they went for resolution with the same pixel density, I would expect the full-frame D500 to have better high ISO performance than the crop version, no?

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 17:46 UTC
On article How do you know you need a new camera? (402 comments in total)
In reply to:

NikonJunkieGirl: The grips were peeling off my D700 as well, so I sent it back to Nikon, asked them to give it a spiff up (sensor cleaning, general maintenance) and either replace or re-glue the grips.

Came back perfect. I recently listed it on eBay and then changed my mind. It's just such a legend.

Yeah, I've basically decided to stop selling my old cameras, unless I hate them. Fairly often I have situations when I need to take a camera into a dangerous environment that could kill it. For example, tomorrow I'll be walking 1.4 miles up a rocky creek (in the water) to get to a waterfall for an engagement session. Rather than risk one of my D750s or D500, I'll just take the D700. The pictures will be fine, and if it gets dunked by accident, I can replace it for $600.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 17:27 UTC
On article How do you know you need a new camera? (402 comments in total)
In reply to:

ZeBebito: Excellent article Carey. I don't know, but if you need/want an upgrade to an already great camera like the D700, the D750 would be a logical step followed by a D810. Personally, my "upgrades" have been more based on a simple desire to change gear and try new things rather than technical aspects.

I upgraded from two D700s to two D750s. The 750 is a lovely camera, but the meager grouping of AF points -- all too close to the center -- is a daily frustration. When I added a D500 to the kit I realized just how deprived I had been when shooting the D750s. And the overall percentage of in-focus photos went up dramatically with the D500 as well. I'm waiting impatiently for a full-frame version of the the D500.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 17:19 UTC
On article How do you know you need a new camera? (402 comments in total)
In reply to:

rev32: Does anyone have suggestions on how to reattach the covering on a Nikon?No offense Mr. Rose but I don't want to use tape on my camera. But maybe that adds something to the mystique of being the photographer, and makes one look like a seasoned professional?

If you and your clients are happy who are we to complain or judge?

Bite the bullet and send it into NPS. For a couple hundred bucks or less they'll diligently go through the beast and find and repair the most minute issues, including putting new leather or whatever the hell that is on it. Worth the money. The D700 is just fine in a huge percentage of situations that photographers face, and you'll have the satisfaction of having the loudest shutter in the room.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 17:15 UTC
On article How do you know you need a new camera? (402 comments in total)
In reply to:

(unknown member): If someone needs to sell items to be able to afford new camera that someone is in the wrong profession.

Clearly you are either indifferent to, or unfamiliar with the lives of some of the world's greatest artists.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 17:13 UTC
On article How do you know you need a new camera? (402 comments in total)
In reply to:

Absolutic: Just pick D500. Same af as D5 except the af points go all th way. Low light ISO is at least as good as D700 and arguably better. DR is 14EV according to DXO. 10 frames per second is plenty. The camera is a marvel. U wont need to buy anything new other tha n perhaps one or two wider lenses

The D700 was/is a monster, and I used two of them professionally far longer than I expected too. I've used just about every Nikon digital made, and IMHO, the D500 is easily the greatest Nikon in history. It does everything, so, so well. Except. . . it's not a full-frame. But I look at that body and I say -- no way Nikon tooled this thing up without thinking about a full-frame version. My fingers are firmly crossed. The thing is though, Nikon can be bloody-minded, and you just never know what they will (or will not) do. It's like being in love with the most beautiful, intelligent woman in the world, who more often than we would like goes out for a quick drink and comes home at 7 in the morning without her panties. Being a Nikon fanboy is JUST that frustrating.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2017 at 17:10 UTC
In reply to:

dwill23: More political stories on dpreview. What a shame.

Politics forced a wedge between police and half the country (dems). This story has NOTHING to do with digital Photography reviews.

The sad part is, every dept settles, and normally much faster than 5 years. This is a fail, not justice. Hopefully it will be paid out after Trump's tax cuts so she'll get more than $33k after taxes.

You can't be serious. In these tumultuous times, photographers find themselves taking pictures where they can easily come in direct contact with police officers, many of whom have proven to be not shy in violating civil rights of photographers. This fact, combined with average photographer's fuzzy understanding of their rights and responsibilities, makes this a vital subject wherever photographers convene and exchange information. Over the years, DPReview has hosted healthy debates on subjects like privacy, publicity rights, and the ind and outs of model releases and when permission is - and is not - required to take or use a photo. This subject is no less appropriate, especially since there is a very real risk of physical violence and possible arrest when dealing with law enforcement personnel, some of whom don't know the law, and others willing to bend or break it to avoid being caught on camera.

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2017 at 16:48 UTC
In reply to:

Hanoise: Adobe is a company who has worked out how to rip customers off completely and utterly.
They have worked out how to charge all adobe user to pay for EVERY SINGLE UPDATE and pay through their teeth!

My subscription has finished this month, and I am looking for different options now for video and stills editing software. I would be much happier to pay a one off fee of many hundreds then keep giving adobe money mo th after month for ever.

It will be much more affordable to pay a lot in one hit, then have money ripped out of your account every month forever,.

ADOBE, YOU HAVE BECOME THE TWO HORNS OF THE WHOLE INDUSTRY.......

How ironic that you're complaining about a software upgrade that provides support for among many other things, a Fuji camera that costs $6500 with lens over $2500. Total cost for the entire set of Photoshop, Adobe Camera Raw, Adobe Bridge, and Lightroom? A paltry $9.95 per month. And here you are whining like a baby. For most of us serious amateur or full-time photographers, these software packages are irreplaceable must haves, and yet they cost less than your monthly big date at McDonalds.

Seriously- if you truly understood the size of the team and the energy spent keeping Adobe software mission-critical reliable, you'd slap yourself for being such a pathetic cheapskate. You can't keep youself in wheels on your skateboard or buy clothes for your Barbie doll for what it costs to acess the entire goodness of the Adobe photo suite. Photography is neither an inexpensive hobby nor an easy profession to make a living at, but any way you look at it, Adobe software is a rare bargain.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2017 at 08:45 UTC

Nikon should focus its energies on getting bought out by Sony, who are in a position to maintain the venerable Nikon DSLR business.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2017 at 19:22 UTC as 195th comment | 2 replies
Total: 22, showing: 1 – 20
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