Kawika Nui

Lives in United States United States
Works as a Undeclared/General Ed
Joined on Sep 16, 2010
About me:

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Total: 294, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Idaho in the spring: 9 must-shoot spots (31 comments in total)

He missed a couple of good ones.
--The flume below the dam just outside of Boise.
--The view from a lava field looking down on an incredible, green oasis and blue stream in a deep valley, off the road from Boise to Mountain Home.
--Some great stuff around Cd'A and Sandpoint. Like frozen mini-fiords around Lake Pend Oreille, only accessible via X-C skis, that are so pretty they look fake.
But that's what happens when you start from a guidebook.

Link | Posted on Jul 28, 2017 at 14:21 UTC as 2nd comment
In reply to:

weisman: Cindy Sherman, one of the most famous art photographers of all time, didn’t press the shutter button herself in many cases:

“Initially [Cindy] Sherman photographed the Film Stills in the loft apartment where she and Longo lived. She took many of the pictures herself using an extended shutter release; others, particularly those set in outdoor locations, required a second person to take the photograph, such as her boyfriend, friends or family. Sherman’s father took #48, in which she appears as a vulnerable young woman waiting with a suitcase at the side of a darkening country road.”

tate DOT org.uk/art/artworks/sherman-untitled-film-still-53-p11519

I betcha Ms. Sherman owns the copyright to all her images…

"I betcha Ms. Sherman owns the copyright to all her images…"
Technically, only if she can prove such images were works for hire, with a signed release or verbal contract. If someone takes a photo with your camera, it's their photo.

Link | Posted on Jul 28, 2017 at 14:17 UTC
In reply to:

VadymA: Probably a bit late to ask here, but was there anything that the photographer could have done to protect his rights to this photo before he uploaded it from his camera to social media? I understand that once it is in public domain, there are all sorts of caveats, but I cannot believe there is nothing I can do to claim the ownership on the pictures that come out from my camera. So is this just a case of poor due diligence on the side of the photographer?

Any photo that you take is yours, and you (and your heirs) own the copyright (life of the author + 50 years). It doesn't matter whether or not you register it, put it online, send copies to your friends or turn it into a billboard. Under the current copyright law, you own it. Period. The main advantage of registering is proof of ownership, but if you have the original with EXIF data that is proof enough. In fact, some photographers have successfully claimed ownership of a shot - not the photo, but the subject and angle and distance. There is a case from New Orleans, a shot of a cemetery. The first photographer sued an imitator, who took a very similar shot from the same spot, and won. To me, that's absurd. But it happened.

Link | Posted on Jul 28, 2017 at 14:14 UTC
On article Opinion: DJI has abandoned professionals (417 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sergey Borachev: People die as a result of inadequate control over powerful tools. Let's hope the authorities have learnt from the ongoing and painful experience of allowing guns in the community. Drones are so powerful and difficult to monitor and control, and what we have seen is only the beginning of what certainly will be much more capable and problematic in future as they proliferate.

thanks for the clarification. Here's another thing about drones: privacy. Lately some jerk has the habit of hovering his drone above the alley and taking leisurely video of backyards (including mine) with people in them (including me). I really wish it were legal to just shoot the damn thing down in this type of case. I'm rather old-fashioned when it comes to privacy, and this jerk makes a habit of invading the privacy of people in their own homes. Can't figure out where he's flying it from, so can't ask him to stop.

Link | Posted on Jul 28, 2017 at 14:04 UTC
On article Opinion: DJI has abandoned professionals (417 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sergey Borachev: People die as a result of inadequate control over powerful tools. Let's hope the authorities have learnt from the ongoing and painful experience of allowing guns in the community. Drones are so powerful and difficult to monitor and control, and what we have seen is only the beginning of what certainly will be much more capable and problematic in future as they proliferate.

Sergey, you have aroused the wrath of libertarian NRA fans.
Malcolm, you miss the point. Devices that can cause disaster in the wrong hands (like bringing down an airliner full of people with a drone) need to be regulated and controlled. It's that simple. I love guns but I'm an old-school NRA type - from the era where the NRA didn't want every nitwit to have a firearm - the era before all the mass shootings we now endure.
Terry, the no-gun nation of Japan is one of the safest places on earth. Here's a simple equation: no guns = no gun deaths.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 18:13 UTC
On article Opinion: DJI has abandoned professionals (417 comments in total)
In reply to:

mr.izo: are you naive enough to think, this is really 100% dji decision? same "happend" to google, when nsa wants/demands collaboration.
it's all about data and surveillance..

Not a valid comparison. Google isn't endangering the lives of airplane passengers and pilots. (Although just give them some time with automated vehicles.)

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 18:07 UTC
On article Opinion: DJI has abandoned professionals (417 comments in total)

Don't blame DJI, blame the self-centered idiots who want to to what they want to do. DJI could face liability issues if they enable destructive behavior, so they have taken a prudent course.
Better would have been to provide an encrypted override for qualified pilots.
As for this idea: "Have the mobile device running the DJI GO app send a ping to the FAA if a drone enters restricted airspace and forward the ping to the tower controlling that airspace. " How many more ATC staff are you willing to pay for (training, salary, benefits)? They are overworked already, and this "solution" would add more work and more potential for fatal accidents.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 18:03 UTC as 36th comment
In reply to:

Retzius: If a person is having a negative experience on Instagram or Facebook can't an individual just not log on or create a new account that blocks who is allowed to post? I don't understand why a person would keep using a particular social media app if they felt they were getting bullied...

It would be interesting to see a bit more depth to the "studies" about social media. The family structure and family dynamics need to be included. I've taught kids ages 11-12 to 18 in a pretty primitive and toxic environment, and some of them were totally unaffected by it. Those kids had good family support and structure.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 01:46 UTC
In reply to:

Clyde Thomas: Stir discussion and provoke thought. Well done.

https://g.co/kgs/WxLigt

Dark Mirror Season 3 Episode 1 "Nosedive" is an excellent future projection for this same topic. It takes Instagram to its ultimate evolution, where you must have a certain number of "likes" before you can rise in social status. Some neighborhoods will refuse to allow you to live there unless you have a following.

And no sane person would want to live in one of those neighborhoods.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 01:43 UTC
In reply to:

cosinaphile: Instagram and Facebook are just 2 manifestations of the wrong turn of society when we submit to allowing corporations to form our societies direction

food air water toxins carcinogens entertainment ..and now the mind itself

. i wonder if anything is safe from the damaging effects of corporate control

Good points. It's pretty easy to be safe from a lot of it by not participating in it. Go online? Sure, for facts and information and ideas. Social media? Why bother? Same for bad food and the like. Entertainment? Most of the public entertainment is hardly worth the time. Photography (actually looking things outside the self, and finding creative and challenging ways to capture them in images or video) is a great entertainment. Reading is another - used books are sold for $1 or less in shops or at the local library. Sports. Yoga. Nature. Music - play it yourself is nice; also there's great stuff online. Food? Learn to cook; have some friends over.
The problem is consumerism and no one is forced to play that game.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 01:42 UTC
In reply to:

HarryLally: What has this got to do with photography or photographic kit? What will the next article be on? Cookery?

I understand the responses to your comment. They are of the same mindset that calls graffiti "art" instead of "vandalism." Sorry, it's vandalism. And instagram snapshots are not photography; photography implies much more. Just as poker is not a sport, even though poker tournaments are shown on sports channels on TV.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 01:37 UTC
On article Olympus TG-5 gallery updated (71 comments in total)
In reply to:

pkcpga: I wish Olympus would come out with a m4/3 or 1" sensor rugged camera, something Sony rx100 sized but durable and waterproof.

"Nikon did precisely that with their rugged Nikon 1 AW1 camera. "
No, they did not. They came out with an ILC that lacked image stabilization.

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2017 at 19:37 UTC
On article Olympus TG-5 gallery updated (71 comments in total)
In reply to:

Techo: All this release did is lower the price on the TG-4. The IQ is just as awful as a 3-5 year old tough cam.

You are getting slagged for your comment, which is typical of trolls.
I had the TG-2 and TG-3 and sent them both back due to abysmal IQ. Haven't used the TG-5, but from the many sample photos online it appears only marginally better. Very soft and often things like leaves, grass and the like appear painted on with brushstrokes. If you're only sharing photos on Facebook it's probably OK, but if you need to crop and/or enlarge you may not be happy with many of your shots (depending on the subject and the texture of the scene.
Now, trolls, slag on.

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2017 at 19:33 UTC
On article Olympus TG-5 gallery updated (71 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jefftan: which raw extraction software to use is best?

Try working with FastStone or IrfanView or RawTherapee. All free. No need to do any conversion before editing. You also can open and then Save As...
I used to use Adobe stand-alone DNG converter but it made a mess of curves and contrast.

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2017 at 19:28 UTC
On article Olympus TG-5 gallery updated (71 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mateus1: Supprise, TG-5 renders colours better then very expensive Fuji X-T2 - including skin tones and greens. X-Trans III brings worse colour ballance vs X-Trans II and I.

Troll much?

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2017 at 19:26 UTC
On article Olympus TG-5 gallery updated (71 comments in total)
In reply to:

infrequenttraveller: I - and others maybe too? - have a general problem which is not limited to the TG-5, but applies to all of this waterproof cameras: I mostly need them for kayaking. However, usually I'm wearing varifocals which I swap for sports glasses while on the water - but the sports glasses are not varifocals and for distance only.

So, I just can't see what's on the display when I'm sitting in the kayak. Why can't we get some kind of very simple aid like the sports finder of old, attached to the camera body? something like the Ikodot viewfinder?

http://www.urban75.org/photos/ikodot-finder.html

I would even get an Ikodot for this camera, but, alas, there's no accessory shoe to put it in...

As we all are getting older, could we get some help in this regard please, Olympus, and whoever is making such cameras?

It's not just about getting older. In many bright situations rear screens are useless. P&S becomes "point and pray."
P&S makers went through a phase of eliminating EVFs. Thank goodness they came to their senses for the most part, and reinstated EFVs. Maybe they will get smart with the "tough" cams one of these years...

Link | Posted on Jul 16, 2017 at 19:25 UTC
In reply to:

Toselli: In my opinion he prepared the camera knowing that for how the environment around was configured he had a 99% of possibility that the shutter would have been triggered. He even modified the environment around the camera to have that high possibility. Now in my opinion it's not that different when you take a picture of a landscape on a tripod, and you set an Intervalometer to trigger the shutter after a few seconds after you pull up the mirror. It's the same thing: in both cases you don't personally take the picture, but you configure the environment around the camera to trigger the shutter.

You're right, and we can take this one step further. One can set up motion-activated shutter release to get images of wild animals. It's done all the time. It would be ridiculous to claim that the animals own the images, or that the photographer doesn't.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 02:24 UTC
In reply to:

golfhov: https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/world/2011/jul/04/shutter-happy-monkey-photographer
For those trying to make this into something it isn't.
Here is Mr. Slater in his own words. He had NO creative intent. The monkeys played with the camera and randomness ensued.
So all those turning this into "Mr Slater clearly setup the camera in the best manner and directed the monkeys" need to step off the crazy train.

Much art has no "creative intent." Randomness - and viewer/audience participation, both voluntary and otherwise - is considered to be the essence of much modern art, music and drama.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 02:23 UTC
In reply to:

BBQue: Had the photographer set the camera to "continues shooting mode" before handing it to the monkey and triggered the release, or used a remote release, there would be no legal battle. It's totally silly and irrelevant in my opinion, whether the monkey pressed the button or not. But then I am not a lawyer, thank God!

It is a sad day, when PETA completely goes overboard and destroys a human being, all in the name of "animal's copyrights" (which don't even exist). What's next? Do we have to ask animals for consent to have their pictures taken at the zoo?

Don't give PETA any more ideas!

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 02:21 UTC
In reply to:

cosinaphile: i have more respect for the intellect of this one playful macaque than all the peta lawyers in the universe

i do think PETA did grave damage to their already mixed reputation with this nonsense ....they only served to paint themselves petty misguided fools out to prove a point that never existed

Agreed.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 02:20 UTC
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