falconeyes

falconeyes

Lives in Germany Germany
Has a website at falklumo.blogspot.com
Joined on Apr 28, 2008

Comments

Total: 1096, showing: 21 – 40
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In reply to:

tkbslc: One of the biggest problems is motion sickness. In studies involving college students, up to 80% of Women and 40% men had moderate to severe motion sickness after playing a VR game or watching a VR video for 15-30 minutes. Your body's balance systems go haywire when your body thinks it is moving, but it isn't. It's hard to want to drop a thousand on a sweet VR system if there's a very good chance it will make you sick to play it.

The problem with 3D TVs mostly was bad screen quality and an exaggerated 3D effect.

With a passive and bright 3D OLED screen and a movie with moderate 3D effects, the viewing experience actually is very pleasurable. Ironically, you can't buy such TVs anymore in 2017.

The focusing is a smaller issue as otherwise, it would create headache in 2D movies too (eyes trying to refocus between foreground and background).

But the parallalax adjustment can cause headache indeed. About 25% of viewers report about issues.

OTOH, ships cause motion sickness and there still are ships ;)

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2017 at 17:37 UTC
In reply to:

alaska_tim: Regarding point 6, the differences between a technology that allows you to freely move around a virtual space, and 360 degree photo/video, in which you are stuck in the center of a spherical space (I include Facebook's parallax tech here) may not be limitations, so much as differences between related but separate media analogous to the differences between photography, cinematography and video games. Our expectations of each should be different, be they conventional or 360 degree. Also, as playing multiple photographs in rapid succession is cinematography, 360 cinematography becomes a VR video game when you can walk around a virtual space.

Also do not underestimate points 1 and 3 as they relate to 360 photo/video. Stereoscopic photography has been around since the 1860's. This and other 3D viewing tech have never caught on precisely because they require special equipment (e.g. glasses) to enjoy. So long as this is the case 360 degree photo/video is unlikely to achieve wide adoption.

I have worked on this.

Using 100+ cameras allows to capture enough data to record an animated 3D scene which can be rendered into whatever perspective dynamically.

I used it to create fly-around/-through movies through buildings not accessible otherwise.

The problem is that it is VERY compute intense and the reconstructed 3D scenes have unsufficient quality for cinematographic content. Esp. areas with lack of detail need attention from algorithmic research.

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2017 at 17:27 UTC
In reply to:

autoxnyc: I use Macs for post processing but I don't understand why Apple still have not made changes so people can run Photoshop on the iPad pros. What's the point of having the stylus if you are limited to iOS apps. I just pre-ordered the new Surface Pro for editing on the go with full version of LR and PS.

Did you watch the keynote at all?

The REAL wow effect was the presentation of new Affinity Photo for iPad on stage. What colorblind said above. It was an amazing demo of what can be done on a tablet now.

Point is: the UI of a tablet needs to be much different from a desktop or notebook. Adobe would have to rewrite Photoshop from scratch. What they don't do, they rather ship gimmicky apps instead. OTOH, Affinity Photo is the real deal now on a tablet.

Adding a MacOS emulation box into iOS wouldn't solve the problem. The resulting software would be awkward to use. Very un-apple like.

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2017 at 22:58 UTC

Swiss jokes are best. Slow but best :)

Link | Posted on Jun 1, 2017 at 06:39 UTC as 73rd comment | 1 reply
On article The DJI Spark is a $500 HD mini drone (96 comments in total)
In reply to:

privater: So this 1st generation of Spark is 300g, almost meet the FAA drone registration lower bar: 250g, maybe next generation will bypass the regulation.

The 250g limit aplies to many countries, not only US. E.g., in Germany, it applies to amateurs too. Moreover, the law can easily be changed and override the court ruling.

Seems like DJI actually welcomes the registration requirement and possibly made the Spark cross the 250g limit on purpose.

Link | Posted on May 25, 2017 at 07:34 UTC
On article The DJI Spark is a $500 HD mini drone (96 comments in total)
In reply to:

privater: So this 1st generation of Spark is 300g, almost meet the FAA drone registration lower bar: 250g, maybe next generation will bypass the regulation.

The battery is 92g alone. I am pretty sure there will be tuning kits soon bringing the device to 249g :)

For a start, remove the hood and drill holes ...

Link | Posted on May 24, 2017 at 23:05 UTC
On article What gear do filmmakers rent most often? (15 comments in total)

This is a Sharegrid infomercial. I still liked it, they have a cool idea. I am just wondering though why they aren't adding other locations and other type of gear more agressively. Wish them success.

Link | Posted on May 24, 2017 at 08:40 UTC as 1st comment

The article is based on the current state-of-the-art.

However, speaking as someone who developped a contrast-AF algorithm, it is a bit short-sighted. Contrast AF doesn't need to hunt for optimal focus necessarily and it could easily outperform phase detect at severely defocused scenes. The depth from defocus approach may give you an idea. And then there are the dual-pixel AF sensors which still await their proper algorithmic exploitation.

On the mechanical side, consider piezo-driven sensor-hubs (in body, not unlike in-body stabilization, only z rather than x/y-direction). It would do the final focus fine tune operation which all lens AF motors fail at due to mechanical tolerances in the micron range. Ring-type motors are still required for FAST AF with fast tele lenses, mirrorless or not, at least for 300/2.8 class lenses.

Moreover, a lens made for a mirrorless legacy mount could retract into (or use) the empty space.

But will legacy Canikon ever be this innovative?

Link | Posted on May 24, 2017 at 08:19 UTC as 44th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Dragonrider: Just a taste of things to come for the VR industry. VR is just the next attempt at 3D and the last 4 or 5 attempts have failed as will this one. Disney CircleVision theaters are cool to visit, but strapping a headset on and trying to watch a 360 degree panorama in 3D is going to create one huge headache (literally). Our eyes focus with PDAF just like an SLR and when depth information is presented on the same plane, our eyes try to focus on the virtual position that the depth information is suggesting. The problem is that the focus plane of the screen/viewer doesn't move so our eyes actually go out of focus. The greater the scope and depth of the image, the greater the focus error and hence the greater the headache. 3D works well to present a small amount of depth information (i.e. with the DOF of our eyes at the presented brightness), but when the monster flies out of the screen and up to your seat, it makes your head hurt.

3D attempts have been failing and the last one did too, correct.

However, I see 3D eventually arriving just as color did.
If you ever watched 3D on any recent 65" 4k OLED you know what I mean ... most of the issues are gone, except for the glasses snap-on and maximum brightness achieved (best with a dimmed room). No ghosting, flickering, loss in resolution or headaches. We're really getting there ... over time.

Ironically, 3D OLED TV sets have been discontinued on the market.

Industry has a tendancy to hype things to death.

Link | Posted on May 24, 2017 at 07:35 UTC
On article Nikon reshuffles management structure (248 comments in total)

No one responsible for the camera business - bad structure

Link | Posted on May 20, 2017 at 12:51 UTC as 29th comment
In reply to:

falconeyes: Thanks.
I esp. appreciated the samples which cannot easily be stitched from two vertical slightly narrower frames. Like Aurora or first waterfall.

Many waterfalls, yes. But a few combinations of exp.time and waterfall are harder to stitch. Those who have changing flow patterns.

Link | Posted on May 8, 2017 at 21:41 UTC

Thanks.
I esp. appreciated the samples which cannot easily be stitched from two vertical slightly narrower frames. Like Aurora or first waterfall.

Link | Posted on May 7, 2017 at 16:58 UTC as 36th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

falconeyes: The service by EXIF.co has no real value. I am disappointed by the "smart watermark" feature too.

I thought about a similiar service years ago. And it would have embedded a dynamic, invisible watermark (steganography) into every image served by the image host. It would contain timestamp and download IP and a searchable attribute. Plus a service to scan the net for such images and automatically go after those who download and share. BTW, the same is possible for music and movies. Much better solution than DRM.

I already run a software company for an even greater idea.
The idea above is free for anybody to grab. Esp. California with its simple minded capital infrastructure. Call it social media content next gen ;)

Link | Posted on May 7, 2017 at 16:51 UTC

Some commenters below are unfamiliar with VR. Unlike 360 pano photography, this isn't an art form. It is a TECHNOLOGY meant for VR headsets. It can't be adequately consumed in front of a monitor.

Convincing VR needs 12k indeed as this still is just FHD per 60 degrees FoV.

However, this rig cannot deliver true 12k. With the lenses this wide and more the 180 degrees FoV per 4k capture, you'll end up with something around 6k for the final VR capture. The rig seems ill-specced and the article is short on technical details.

IMHO, the rig is overkill vs., e.g., a 6 GoPro rig which delivers stunning 360 video too.

Moreover, the true hot topic of today is 3D VR rigs, like the Odyssey. They tend to use rings of cameras plus top (plus sometimes bottom). 3D VR rigs need to create left eye plus right eye 360 degree video footage simultaneously. A cheaper alternative to the 17 camera setups would have been worth a news article. Spotted anything of that sort out there?

Link | Posted on May 3, 2017 at 09:38 UTC as 19th comment | 1 reply

Bad press is better than no press.
Well played, whoever you are, Sal ...

Link | Posted on May 3, 2017 at 09:12 UTC as 21st comment
In reply to:

falconeyes: The service by EXIF.co has no real value. I am disappointed by the "smart watermark" feature too.

I thought about a similiar service years ago. And it would have embedded a dynamic, invisible watermark (steganography) into every image served by the image host. It would contain timestamp and download IP and a searchable attribute. Plus a service to scan the net for such images and automatically go after those who download and share. BTW, the same is possible for music and movies. Much better solution than DRM.

The simple fact that proliferated digital files can be traced back to whoever put it into the wild would be tremendous help. For a starter, people would refrain from sharing.
You would tell them and because the watermark is invisble, they never can be sure to remove it. Its like a security cam, it just works when thieves are watched.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2017 at 23:49 UTC
In reply to:

falconeyes: > ASML has come to dominate several aspects of the market [...] previously divided up primarily between Nikon and Canon.

Maybe, this should be food for thought. Engineers, not laywers, decide over your future, Nikon ...

You're not getting what I meant to say. Of course, engineers need guidance, empowering and the brilliant ones need be attracted and hired first ;)

Link | Posted on Apr 30, 2017 at 09:29 UTC
On article Sphere of frustration: Nikon KeyMission 360 review (200 comments in total)
In reply to:

falconeyes: This kind of devices, like Ricoh Theta, belongs to China. Look at the YI VR 360. They can do it better and cheaper. The quality from YI (5.7k) may even be a tad better than toy level.

The future for Nikon (besides the obvious mirrorless pro) if they really want to diversify, is in high quality, yet affordable tools for new application areas. E.g., for stereoscopic (3D) VR in 8k quality w/o the need for a $16000 17 camera setup. But this would require strengths in software Nikon does not have. So, better just confine yourself on your core competence and don't loose the professional event pro market to Sony.

If you don't think that YI and alike eat that market, then ask GoPro shareholders ...
My comment applies to Ricoh as well. The Theta S 4k is dead on arrival.
My actual point was that this isn't a direction to invest into for any Japanese camera company. Nor is action cameras. Nor is drones, drone camera, or gimbal.

Link | Posted on Apr 30, 2017 at 09:15 UTC
In reply to:

falconeyes: The service by EXIF.co has no real value. I am disappointed by the "smart watermark" feature too.

I thought about a similiar service years ago. And it would have embedded a dynamic, invisible watermark (steganography) into every image served by the image host. It would contain timestamp and download IP and a searchable attribute. Plus a service to scan the net for such images and automatically go after those who download and share. BTW, the same is possible for music and movies. Much better solution than DRM.

Did you read my comment?
Digimarc embedds a static watermark identifying the photographer, my proposal embedds a dynamic watermark identifying the downloader or customer. The former, like EXIF.co, has no real value.

Link | Posted on Apr 30, 2017 at 09:12 UTC
On article Sphere of frustration: Nikon KeyMission 360 review (200 comments in total)

This kind of devices, like Ricoh Theta, belongs to China. Look at the YI VR 360. They can do it better and cheaper. The quality from YI (5.7k) may even be a tad better than toy level.

The future for Nikon (besides the obvious mirrorless pro) if they really want to diversify, is in high quality, yet affordable tools for new application areas. E.g., for stereoscopic (3D) VR in 8k quality w/o the need for a $16000 17 camera setup. But this would require strengths in software Nikon does not have. So, better just confine yourself on your core competence and don't loose the professional event pro market to Sony.

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2017 at 11:25 UTC as 24th comment | 2 replies
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