falconeyes

falconeyes

Lives in Germany Germany
Has a website at falklumo.blogspot.com
Joined on Apr 28, 2008

Comments

Total: 1072, showing: 1 – 20
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On article The DJI Spark is a $500 HD mini drone (79 comments in total)
In reply to:

privater: So this 1st generation of Spark is 300g, almost meet the FAA drone registration lower bar: 250g, maybe next generation will bypass the regulation.

The 250g limit aplies to many countries, not only US. E.g., in Germany, it applies to amateurs too. Moreover, the law can easily be changed and override the court ruling.

Seems like DJI actually welcomes the registration requirement and possibly made the Spark cross the 250g limit on purpose.

Link | Posted on May 25, 2017 at 07:34 UTC
On article The DJI Spark is a $500 HD mini drone (79 comments in total)
In reply to:

privater: So this 1st generation of Spark is 300g, almost meet the FAA drone registration lower bar: 250g, maybe next generation will bypass the regulation.

The battery is 92g alone. I am pretty sure there will be tuning kits soon bringing the device to 249g :)

For a start, remove the hood and drill holes ...

Link | Posted on May 24, 2017 at 23:05 UTC
On article What gear do filmmakers rent most often? (15 comments in total)

This is a Sharegrid infomercial. I still liked it, they have a cool idea. I am just wondering though why they aren't adding other locations and other type of gear more agressively. Wish them success.

Link | Posted on May 24, 2017 at 08:40 UTC as 1st comment

The article is based on the current state-of-the-art.

However, speaking as someone who developped a contrast-AF algorithm, it is a bit short-sighted. Contrast AF doesn't need to hunt for optimal focus necessarily and it could easily outperform phase detect at severely defocused scenes. The depth from defocus approach may give you an idea. And then there are the dual-pixel AF sensors which still await their proper algorithmic exploitation.

On the mechanical side, consider piezo-driven sensor-hubs (in body, not unlike in-body stabilization, only z rather than x/y-direction). It would do the final focus fine tune operation which all lens AF motors fail at due to mechanical tolerances in the micron range. Ring-type motors are still required for FAST AF with fast tele lenses, mirrorless or not, at least for 300/2.8 class lenses.

Moreover, a lens made for a mirrorless legacy mount could retract into (or use) the empty space.

But will legacy Canikon ever be this innovative?

Link | Posted on May 24, 2017 at 08:19 UTC as 39th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Dragonrider: Just a taste of things to come for the VR industry. VR is just the next attempt at 3D and the last 4 or 5 attempts have failed as will this one. Disney CircleVision theaters are cool to visit, but strapping a headset on and trying to watch a 360 degree panorama in 3D is going to create one huge headache (literally). Our eyes focus with PDAF just like an SLR and when depth information is presented on the same plane, our eyes try to focus on the virtual position that the depth information is suggesting. The problem is that the focus plane of the screen/viewer doesn't move so our eyes actually go out of focus. The greater the scope and depth of the image, the greater the focus error and hence the greater the headache. 3D works well to present a small amount of depth information (i.e. with the DOF of our eyes at the presented brightness), but when the monster flies out of the screen and up to your seat, it makes your head hurt.

3D attempts have been failing and the last one did too, correct.

However, I see 3D eventually arriving just as color did.
If you ever watched 3D on any recent 65" 4k OLED you know what I mean ... most of the issues are gone, except for the glasses snap-on and maximum brightness achieved (best with a dimmed room). No ghosting, flickering, loss in resolution or headaches. We're really getting there ... over time.

Ironically, 3D OLED TV sets have been discontinued on the market.

Industry has a tendancy to hype things to death.

Link | Posted on May 24, 2017 at 07:35 UTC
On article Nikon reshuffles management structure (244 comments in total)

No one responsible for the camera business - bad structure

Link | Posted on May 20, 2017 at 12:51 UTC as 27th comment
In reply to:

falconeyes: Thanks.
I esp. appreciated the samples which cannot easily be stitched from two vertical slightly narrower frames. Like Aurora or first waterfall.

Many waterfalls, yes. But a few combinations of exp.time and waterfall are harder to stitch. Those who have changing flow patterns.

Link | Posted on May 8, 2017 at 21:41 UTC

Thanks.
I esp. appreciated the samples which cannot easily be stitched from two vertical slightly narrower frames. Like Aurora or first waterfall.

Link | Posted on May 7, 2017 at 16:58 UTC as 34th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

falconeyes: The service by EXIF.co has no real value. I am disappointed by the "smart watermark" feature too.

I thought about a similiar service years ago. And it would have embedded a dynamic, invisible watermark (steganography) into every image served by the image host. It would contain timestamp and download IP and a searchable attribute. Plus a service to scan the net for such images and automatically go after those who download and share. BTW, the same is possible for music and movies. Much better solution than DRM.

I already run a software company for an even greater idea.
The idea above is free for anybody to grab. Esp. California with its simple minded capital infrastructure. Call it social media content next gen ;)

Link | Posted on May 7, 2017 at 16:51 UTC

Some commenters below are unfamiliar with VR. Unlike 360 pano photography, this isn't an art form. It is a TECHNOLOGY meant for VR headsets. It can't be adequately consumed in front of a monitor.

Convincing VR needs 12k indeed as this still is just FHD per 60 degrees FoV.

However, this rig cannot deliver true 12k. With the lenses this wide and more the 180 degrees FoV per 4k capture, you'll end up with something around 6k for the final VR capture. The rig seems ill-specced and the article is short on technical details.

IMHO, the rig is overkill vs., e.g., a 6 GoPro rig which delivers stunning 360 video too.

Moreover, the true hot topic of today is 3D VR rigs, like the Odyssey. They tend to use rings of cameras plus top (plus sometimes bottom). 3D VR rigs need to create left eye plus right eye 360 degree video footage simultaneously. A cheaper alternative to the 17 camera setups would have been worth a news article. Spotted anything of that sort out there?

Link | Posted on May 3, 2017 at 09:38 UTC as 19th comment | 1 reply

Bad press is better than no press.
Well played, whoever you are, Sal ...

Link | Posted on May 3, 2017 at 09:12 UTC as 21st comment
In reply to:

falconeyes: The service by EXIF.co has no real value. I am disappointed by the "smart watermark" feature too.

I thought about a similiar service years ago. And it would have embedded a dynamic, invisible watermark (steganography) into every image served by the image host. It would contain timestamp and download IP and a searchable attribute. Plus a service to scan the net for such images and automatically go after those who download and share. BTW, the same is possible for music and movies. Much better solution than DRM.

The simple fact that proliferated digital files can be traced back to whoever put it into the wild would be tremendous help. For a starter, people would refrain from sharing.
You would tell them and because the watermark is invisble, they never can be sure to remove it. Its like a security cam, it just works when thieves are watched.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2017 at 23:49 UTC
In reply to:

falconeyes: > ASML has come to dominate several aspects of the market [...] previously divided up primarily between Nikon and Canon.

Maybe, this should be food for thought. Engineers, not laywers, decide over your future, Nikon ...

You're not getting what I meant to say. Of course, engineers need guidance, empowering and the brilliant ones need be attracted and hired first ;)

Link | Posted on Apr 30, 2017 at 09:29 UTC
On article Sphere of frustration: Nikon KeyMission 360 review (199 comments in total)
In reply to:

falconeyes: This kind of devices, like Ricoh Theta, belongs to China. Look at the YI VR 360. They can do it better and cheaper. The quality from YI (5.7k) may even be a tad better than toy level.

The future for Nikon (besides the obvious mirrorless pro) if they really want to diversify, is in high quality, yet affordable tools for new application areas. E.g., for stereoscopic (3D) VR in 8k quality w/o the need for a $16000 17 camera setup. But this would require strengths in software Nikon does not have. So, better just confine yourself on your core competence and don't loose the professional event pro market to Sony.

If you don't think that YI and alike eat that market, then ask GoPro shareholders ...
My comment applies to Ricoh as well. The Theta S 4k is dead on arrival.
My actual point was that this isn't a direction to invest into for any Japanese camera company. Nor is action cameras. Nor is drones, drone camera, or gimbal.

Link | Posted on Apr 30, 2017 at 09:15 UTC
In reply to:

falconeyes: The service by EXIF.co has no real value. I am disappointed by the "smart watermark" feature too.

I thought about a similiar service years ago. And it would have embedded a dynamic, invisible watermark (steganography) into every image served by the image host. It would contain timestamp and download IP and a searchable attribute. Plus a service to scan the net for such images and automatically go after those who download and share. BTW, the same is possible for music and movies. Much better solution than DRM.

Did you read my comment?
Digimarc embedds a static watermark identifying the photographer, my proposal embedds a dynamic watermark identifying the downloader or customer. The former, like EXIF.co, has no real value.

Link | Posted on Apr 30, 2017 at 09:12 UTC
On article Sphere of frustration: Nikon KeyMission 360 review (199 comments in total)

This kind of devices, like Ricoh Theta, belongs to China. Look at the YI VR 360. They can do it better and cheaper. The quality from YI (5.7k) may even be a tad better than toy level.

The future for Nikon (besides the obvious mirrorless pro) if they really want to diversify, is in high quality, yet affordable tools for new application areas. E.g., for stereoscopic (3D) VR in 8k quality w/o the need for a $16000 17 camera setup. But this would require strengths in software Nikon does not have. So, better just confine yourself on your core competence and don't loose the professional event pro market to Sony.

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2017 at 11:25 UTC as 23rd comment | 2 replies
On article Sphere of frustration: Nikon KeyMission 360 review (199 comments in total)
In reply to:

Quantum Scientist: Mission Impossible.

Plus, VR headsets will probably go the way of 3D TV, in the recycle trash pit of failed technology.

I agree 3D TV is at an epic low.
But if you ever watched passive 3D on a large 4k OLED screen, you wonder if it won't come back once 4k OLED becomes commonplace. Ironically though, LG dropped 3D from their 2017 models ;)

3D needed 4k OLED to arrive first to be a pleasurable experience.
And VR needs 8k capture devices and lag-free, light-weight 2kx2kx2 headsets to arrive first.

Moreover, the required cameras are inaccessible still. For good quality, you need a 17 lens setup with 3D stitching. However, the Google Jump assembler, although claimed open source, requires prior purchase of a $16000 camera.

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2017 at 11:14 UTC

The service by EXIF.co has no real value. I am disappointed by the "smart watermark" feature too.

I thought about a similiar service years ago. And it would have embedded a dynamic, invisible watermark (steganography) into every image served by the image host. It would contain timestamp and download IP and a searchable attribute. Plus a service to scan the net for such images and automatically go after those who download and share. BTW, the same is possible for music and movies. Much better solution than DRM.

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2017 at 10:54 UTC as 14th comment | 9 replies

> ASML has come to dominate several aspects of the market [...] previously divided up primarily between Nikon and Canon.

Maybe, this should be food for thought. Engineers, not laywers, decide over your future, Nikon ...

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2017 at 10:47 UTC as 24th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

falconeyes: I don't know why this is worth a news article.

Sony features this as the "Smooth Reflections" in-camera app and it beats the google app in every aspect. In particular, it combines up to 256 frames into a single RAW in camera! The result is immediate, like if the camera could be set to ISO 10 or ISO 1 even.

Yet, this gorgeous app never got any praise by DPR.

Stacking as such is a trivial technology for DPR readers.

@Dragonrider
The 14 or 16 bits which eventually make it into the RAW are more than enough.
The App simply takes the sum of all sensels, divided by N, or divided by N/4.
It is true that this way, values below N (or N/4) get truncated to zero. But those have been very noisy to start with, esp. with a 1" sensor (even at N=256, the noise would be sqrt(N)/N or 6%. Brighter tones suffer from photon shot noise which is smoothed out. You basically get full 14 or 16 bit DR with the smooth bright tones of a low iso exposure.
I convert to 32bit to enable Lightroom's HDR mode. But I never saw a limitation with the RAWs out of the smooth reflections app.

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2017 at 01:01 UTC
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