falconeyes

falconeyes

Lives in Germany Germany
Has a website at falklumo.blogspot.com
Joined on Apr 28, 2008

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On article Nikon 105mm F1.4E ED sample images (235 comments in total)

105/1.4E vs. 85/1.4Art. Somebody has to try both lenses side by side ;)

Link | Posted on Sep 29, 2016 at 17:10 UTC as 33rd comment | 2 replies
On article Nikon 105mm F1.4E ED sample images (235 comments in total)
In reply to:

Androole: Jeepers! Even at f2.8 it's clear that there's not quite enough DoF for these head-and-shoulders portraits (the nose is blurring). At f2.2 it's quite a bit more pronounced. It looks like f1.4 is only truly usable when you step back for waist-up portraits (Image 4).

It makes you wonder about the marginal benefits of this lens. It looks very nice, but you really have to wonder if it's worth it compared to the smaller, lighter, cheaper 105/f2 DC, a cheap and cheerful 85/1.8, or even a versatile 100/f2.8 Macro.

I'm sure there are pros and amateurs who will find a way to make it work for them, it just seems like a very extreme lens, and suggests that sometimes more is not always better.

@halfwaythere

200mm/2 ≈ 135mm/1.4 ≈ 100mm

Both lenses feature the same amount of background blur, the 135 even a bit less DoF.

Link | Posted on Sep 29, 2016 at 17:04 UTC
On article Photokina 2016: Hands on with Sigma's latest lenses (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

AbrasiveReducer: Neat, sweet, petite. In all the time I worked in the photo industry, this is the only case I can recall where a company just decided to make much better products and somehow, it just happened--like throwing a switch.

Sigma is a family-owned business and control moved from father to son. What you see is from throwing a switch indeed.

Link | Posted on Sep 24, 2016 at 08:45 UTC

Can anybody here comment how accurate was the first version of their light meter?

Link | Posted on Sep 22, 2016 at 20:40 UTC as 3rd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

noisephotographer: The exif data of the images on http://www.si.com/nfl/photo/2016/09/11/iphone-7-plus-sneak-preview-photos deny that iphone 7 Plus has a larger sensor. Crop factor of the wide angle camera is 7.01 (iphone 6s seems to have the same crop factor) and the 56mm camera has a 8.5 crop factor.

@noisephotographer as a courtesy to other readers: I know a thing or two and definitely more than you about the matter I was writing about.

@cosinaphile please try harder next time to understand what I was saying. Thanks.

I am getting tired by this kind of replies ...

Link | Posted on Sep 13, 2016 at 19:28 UTC
In reply to:

noisephotographer: The exif data of the images on http://www.si.com/nfl/photo/2016/09/11/iphone-7-plus-sneak-preview-photos deny that iphone 7 Plus has a larger sensor. Crop factor of the wide angle camera is 7.01 (iphone 6s seems to have the same crop factor) and the 56mm camera has a 8.5 crop factor.

This means that both cameras have a 2.3mm aperture, same light gathering capability. I.e., the tele advantage is with its resolution only, otherwise, you could just crop the wide angle images.

OTOH, overlaying both camera images would double iso capability of the tele camera. Wonder when an app will offer that feature.

Link | Posted on Sep 12, 2016 at 16:00 UTC

Reading the Apple bokeh patent now, I expect it to amaze the masses in the 7+.

Link | Posted on Sep 12, 2016 at 11:57 UTC as 79th comment

All of a sudden, DNG is the de-facto RAW file standard.

Link | Posted on Sep 12, 2016 at 11:51 UTC as 80th comment | 2 replies
On article Hasselblad True Zoom Moto Mod hands-on preview (151 comments in total)

Somehow, a kind of standard to connect cameras and phones is over-due.

It can't be that joke of NFC, Wifi or whatever. Far to complex. The experience must be truely seamless, kind of what the camera app feels on the applewatch (with better performance, of course).

Combining Blutooth and the Wifi transmitters in a zero-config way should provide just that. Nikon tries with Snapbridge but they fall short. Can it be this difficult? I am sure, with S.Jobs alive we'd long have a camera-kit and a solved problem.

Link | Posted on Sep 5, 2016 at 20:08 UTC as 8th comment
In reply to:

HeyItsJoel: So is there going to be a lawsuit against Nikon or what? I mean, if you can sue McDonald's for your coffee being hot, well...

The McDonald's story is an urban legend. If you research it, you'll find McDonalds deserved being sued, in this particular case. Because they continued to serve coffee boiling hot *AFTER* complaints and official orders to stop that policy. They ignored that to better serve truckers who like to drink their coffee later when on the road again.

Link | Posted on Aug 30, 2016 at 09:21 UTC
In reply to:

WilliamJ: A machine operating machines, how exciting ! Where is the Human skill ? Where is the Human point of view ? That's not "photography", just "automated picture taking" at its finest, as do everyday security cameras.

@WilliamJ
> Photography is about controling at its finest point the image cutting in a whole scene, angle, light, moment, everything must be human controled.

Yes, and in drone photography, just add an extra degree of freedom. I replied to your comment because of its logic contradiction. If you followed your own logic, you would have to cease performing your own art (and writing about it). I just pointed that out, had nothing to do if I liked your comment or not. Or from which country I am.

Maybe you thought drone photography offers less artistic freedom. However, if you ever tried it for yourself or more carefully watched this thread's video, you knew that the opposite holds true. Nothing was left to accident.

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2016 at 21:11 UTC
In reply to:

WilliamJ: A machine operating machines, how exciting ! Where is the Human skill ? Where is the Human point of view ? That's not "photography", just "automated picture taking" at its finest, as do everyday security cameras.

@WilliamJ please stop photographing (which after all is nothing more than pushing a machine's trigger) and leave any photography site, including DPR. Thanks.

Link | Posted on Aug 27, 2016 at 22:51 UTC
In reply to:

babart: Nice video, I must admit, and I can only imagine how nice it must be to afford $8000 worth of camera equipment.

OK, call it envy, but just once I'd very much enjoy seeing photos/videos of some spectacular place or event made with equipment most of us could afford to own.

$8000 is reasonably low-priced gear for any pro in any business.

And in this particular case, even many amateurs could afford it.
I don't see why an amateur must criticize promotion of a pro's work just because he used his gear.

And honestly, compare this to the 100 million $ figures Hollywood spends on a movie production ...

Link | Posted on Aug 27, 2016 at 22:46 UTC
In reply to:

Roland Karlsson: Silly! You can patent anything. In a sane world, the one not having the patent would simply laugh at it. This could not win in any court. But, now we live in this world, unfortunately. Populated with ship B passengers.

The problem is with the US which doesn't seem to have a working system of protection of "Utility Models". Countries like Germany protect Utility Models (Gebrauchsmusterschutz) preventing many trivial patents.

I.e., you wouldn't be able to patent a tiltable tripod column, but still be able to protect your specific tripod design. It is sometimes called "design patent", but there lacks a clear line of separation.

Link | Posted on Aug 21, 2016 at 09:08 UTC
In reply to:

mikegml: My ancient Yashica had this facility. That was old when I got it years ago.

https://youtu.be/95AjAm8OvYY

Your Yashica has a clone of the Velbon VS-3 top, just compare the two videos ;)

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2016 at 07:55 UTC

I wonder how this can be patented at all?
My Velbon VS3 from the 80s had this already, and better actually.
According to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WqY0iOfSkjo it was patented back in 1958!!

Link | Posted on Aug 18, 2016 at 17:40 UTC as 8th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

falconeyes: 17s
It took him (at least) 17s to loosen the seat and regain control. He must have been lucky to be this high in the air ... And lucky the seat didn't lock up.

I always thought there must be two side sticks in case one breaks.

There probably IS a second stick and the other pilot took over. But then 17s to me looks uncomfortably long. Shouldn't a pilot react much quicker in a sudden decent situation like this?

EDIT
Ok, reading the invetigation now reveals:
"Within 27sec the aircraft lost 4,440ft in height, before the self-protection system initiated a recovery back towards controlled flight."
Makes me feel even more uncomfortable. Where have the pilots been? (One was outside the cockpit indeed, then thrown to the ceiling ...)

Link | Posted on Aug 18, 2016 at 17:23 UTC

17s
It took him (at least) 17s to loosen the seat and regain control. He must have been lucky to be this high in the air ... And lucky the seat didn't lock up.

I always thought there must be two side sticks in case one breaks.

There probably IS a second stick and the other pilot took over. But then 17s to me looks uncomfortably long. Shouldn't a pilot react much quicker in a sudden decent situation like this?

Link | Posted on Aug 18, 2016 at 17:07 UTC as 18th comment | 2 replies

I don't understand all that negativity.

EISA is a European press award, and a good one at this. It summarizes many notable products in a year and in a particular market. E.g., look at some other categories (like their HiFi award); it is a nice way to stay up to date with markets which are *NOT* one's profession or hobby. And that's all it means to be.

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2016 at 08:48 UTC as 30th comment
In reply to:

falconeyes: This is a test of feasibility (only).

Server farms will use what is most cost-effective, including power consumption, I concede. Large RAID arrays with 6-10TB HDDs have all the bandwidth. And the storage density is 1/6th.

As of today, server farms need a certain amount of CPU power and IO bandwidth to make use of the data, like searching thru it or serving requests over the network. Therefore, beyond some point, shrinking the storage doesn't make the computing center shrink.

Which means that cost/TB still is the driving force.
Which today is about $30 for HDD vs. about $300 for SSD.

1:6 in volume vs. 10:1 in price.

Still a long way to go for SSD technology to be adopted in server farms.

BTW, at $300/TB, this SSD would be $18,000. I guess it will sell for like $9,900 in 2017.

That's much more interesting for field recording (RAID1) than for server farms!

At 986 MByte/s (uncompressed 60fps 4.5k REDCODE RAW), the 60TB are good for 17h of movie or one working day. Perfect ;)

I agree with the database use case. Actually, the current trend goes beyond that (in-memory databases). However, that's not what I would consider a server farm scenario. That's more the enterprise data center use case with a few mission-critical applications.

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2016 at 23:26 UTC
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