falconeyes

falconeyes

Lives in Germany Germany
Has a website at falklumo.blogspot.com
Joined on Apr 28, 2008

Comments

Total: 987, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

falconeyes: I sympathize with Meredith. However, the returning bullets can kill people, so it isn't safe practice to shoot drones. Maybe, the US needs access to safe drone guns. Could even become a sport ;)

I didn't mean shotgun. Sorry for the confusion. Returning bullets kill. Every July 4th. Read the news.

One of many sources: http://articles.latimes.com/1995-06-30/local/me-18804_1_gunshot-wounds (the article discuses the #kills but doesn't question the fact)

But what do I say, it is your country. I am only wondering ...

Link | Posted on Mar 25, 2017 at 20:47 UTC

I sympathize with Meredith. However, the returning bullets can kill people, so it isn't safe practice to shoot drones. Maybe, the US needs access to safe drone guns. Could even become a sport ;)

Link | Posted on Mar 24, 2017 at 20:46 UTC as 50th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

RMGoodLight: This whole article smells like MF bashing from a FF fanboy. Why does it need this here on DPR? The GFX is very expensive and I'm sure who want to buy it will think carefully about the purchase.

I'm arguing about this article because why yet? The Hasselblad X 1D was released before without such "FF is better than MF" articles. And where were the "Thinking about buying a Sony A7R2 / Canon 5DS / Olympus OMD E-M1 II? Read this first" articles?!

I could write similar articles for APSC. Who needs FF? Or how about mFT? I whish you would have shown a real comparison between MF and FF with emphasis on the strength and weakness of both?

The last thing I want to add is that the whole equivation of systems is moot. DOF depends not only on sensor size. It depends on resolution too. A FF 50MP sensor has thinner DOF as a FF 12MP sensor. And larger sensor pixels gather more light and information than smaller ones. That results in sharper images with better color precision. Want proof? The DP2M!

@RMGoidLight,
not wanting to start another debate, just explain. You fall into a common trap of thinking here. DoF is defined for a standard CoC which is, e.g., 1/1500 the image diagonal normally or 1/1730 for the DoF scale on Zeiss lenses.
What you describe (DoF after cropping, or pixel peeping, or printing large and looking close - another way to pixel peep) is NOT technically called DoF. You'd need another term to describe what you try to say, perceived pixelpeep 1:1 sharpness. And even then, 50MP on FF and MF would still remain the same.

Richi's article as is, is 100% technically correct. And it is obviously required. Because as your post illustrates, not everyone had a clear understanding of what Rishi explains.

Link | Posted on Mar 24, 2017 at 09:28 UTC
In reply to:

RMGoodLight: This whole article smells like MF bashing from a FF fanboy. Why does it need this here on DPR? The GFX is very expensive and I'm sure who want to buy it will think carefully about the purchase.

I'm arguing about this article because why yet? The Hasselblad X 1D was released before without such "FF is better than MF" articles. And where were the "Thinking about buying a Sony A7R2 / Canon 5DS / Olympus OMD E-M1 II? Read this first" articles?!

I could write similar articles for APSC. Who needs FF? Or how about mFT? I whish you would have shown a real comparison between MF and FF with emphasis on the strength and weakness of both?

The last thing I want to add is that the whole equivation of systems is moot. DOF depends not only on sensor size. It depends on resolution too. A FF 50MP sensor has thinner DOF as a FF 12MP sensor. And larger sensor pixels gather more light and information than smaller ones. That results in sharper images with better color precision. Want proof? The DP2M!

I attended a road tour event by Fuji where they presented the GFX (those famous events with the nude models, except our model wasn't nude ;) ).

The entire presentation revolved around statements which simply do not hold true. Like the better DR, the better tonality, the cleaner images etc.

Being aware of the truth, I wanted to shout loudly: lies, lies, lies. But I am not that bad a guy ;) And the GFX is a nice camera for other reasons.

Nevertheless, time was overdue for this article written by Rishi. I thank him.

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2017 at 21:22 UTC

@Rishi
> But, yes, if you’re in a light-limited situation (i.e. you’re not shooting at base ISO) and it’s high enough contrast that you care about dynamic range (have to expose for highlights then push shadows), then the GFX 50S will have the upper hand here. <

Just a word of clarification here. There aren't equivalent lenses, only equivalent cameras. Therefore, the GFX will NOT have the upper hand as it would be shot at a higher ISO for equivalent results (same noise). And at such higher iso it will have identical DR. Of course, in order to be able to do so (use lower iso on FF), you need a wider aperture on the full frame. But that's the point of your article: you have that lens anyway.

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2017 at 21:15 UTC as 277th comment

Thanks for a possibly discussion-provoquing article.
But it tells the truth.

I attended a Fuji presentation and sadly, rather than touting the real qualities of a GFX 50S, it was all about non-existing advantages when expressed in equivalent terms, cf. e.g., a D810.

The true opportunity (for Fuji) would have been to release more cost effective high quality glass (because of a less demanding optical formula). But instead they choose to go the expensive road. MF has't hit the sweet spot yet. It may at some time in the future though.

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2017 at 12:03 UTC as 405th comment | 4 replies

It is a great piece of art.
I would have hoped though that meanwhile we possess better resolution imagery of the red planet.
It looks like there are plenty of great landscape photo opportunities nobody has profited from yet. What we have here is more the drone footage kind of photography ;) And certainly very well made!

A question for the knowledgeables ... would Mars atmosphere be thick enough to support a specially made ultra-lightweight helium balloon (with a camera)?

Ok, update -> https://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/programmissions/missions/missiontypes/balloons/
I then look forward to footage from a forthcoming balloon mission.

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2017 at 21:33 UTC as 16th comment
In reply to:

falconeyes: Guetzli is named according to the #GoogleSwissMade series.
It is from the Lab Google Research Europe, located in Zürich, Switzerland and employs 2000 people, the largest Google lab outside the US. It is planned to be grown to 5000 people.

Just a little background info for the kind readers wondering about the name which is Schwizerdütsch actually.

P.S.
Albeit smaller (350 people), the more famous US research lab in Zürich is IBM set up in 1956. It produced one Nobel price.

P.S.2
I'd really liked DPR staff to provide that kind of complementary info. It is easy enough to find ...

@mick I explained why it is named as it is. That's relevant if the article itself is. The Zürich guys name all their compression stuff according to Swiss bakery products (Zopfli, Brotli). What Guetzli does mean exactly doesn't matter though so I left that out. A single word Google search would turn it up anyway.

Link | Posted on Mar 18, 2017 at 09:54 UTC

Guetzli is named according to the #GoogleSwissMade series.
It is from the Lab Google Research Europe, located in Zürich, Switzerland and employs 2000 people, the largest Google lab outside the US. It is planned to be grown to 5000 people.

Just a little background info for the kind readers wondering about the name which is Schwizerdütsch actually.

P.S.
Albeit smaller (350 people), the more famous US research lab in Zürich is IBM set up in 1956. It produced one Nobel price.

P.S.2
I'd really liked DPR staff to provide that kind of complementary info. It is easy enough to find ...

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2017 at 23:57 UTC as 39th comment | 9 replies
In reply to:

Ebrahim Saadawi: That's a whole full fledged shipment for Veydra. They're quite a small business. Low sales. They put very high precision in their mechanics and lens alignment, both of which they do very very well. Cine standards actually. They also cover s35 cinema standard so they're quite perfectly capable photographic APS-C lenses.

I can't believe that once they started importing the parts, manufacturing, they didn't take any care for security. They put their place on kickstarter for christ sake and that's how it looks? Open shelves and an offfice door?

Anyone in the area or knows about Veydra locally or online would easily find them to be perfect targets. They're still 2 hundred thousands of dollars worth of merchandise. a good ''catch'' for any crook.

I remember when Lensrentals was stolen off more than 1 million USD worth of equipment but that was a professionally conducted, planned and excuted heist. This, just sad.

Losing an entire shipments, 200 lenses, may very well financially end the company and lens brand

Not to turn this into a political debate, just some answers.
It was CA I was visiting then. It is correct, Germany had issues with terrorism in late 70/early 80s. But what you saw was police, not private security personnel. And the issue was resolved eventually, not likely to happen with the current problem btw.
I was talking about unfair social conditions in a society and NO, the US has not helped Germany to be a secure country. The opposite is true, with the US way of capitalism (banking reform etc.) swapping over and causing more security concerns more recently.

I don't deny the US way of life is great. It really is. But it doesn't make life and property of people a safe thing.

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2017 at 00:40 UTC
In reply to:

Ebrahim Saadawi: That's a whole full fledged shipment for Veydra. They're quite a small business. Low sales. They put very high precision in their mechanics and lens alignment, both of which they do very very well. Cine standards actually. They also cover s35 cinema standard so they're quite perfectly capable photographic APS-C lenses.

I can't believe that once they started importing the parts, manufacturing, they didn't take any care for security. They put their place on kickstarter for christ sake and that's how it looks? Open shelves and an offfice door?

Anyone in the area or knows about Veydra locally or online would easily find them to be perfect targets. They're still 2 hundred thousands of dollars worth of merchandise. a good ''catch'' for any crook.

I remember when Lensrentals was stolen off more than 1 million USD worth of equipment but that was a professionally conducted, planned and excuted heist. This, just sad.

Losing an entire shipments, 200 lenses, may very well financially end the company and lens brand

The thing which I found most striking when first visiting the US was security personel. You see them everywhere, in supermarkets, office buildings, appartment buildings, schools, ... All places which have no security in, e.g., my country Germany.

So, it may sound natural for an American to ask for special protection service once they stock more than three cans of soda. Just maybe not for the rest of the world. The US may not be aware of what kind of place it has become. It is the price to be paid for extreme inequalities in available income.

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2017 at 13:27 UTC

That's certainly a great app.
But still not as good as my preferred Sony camera App, the Smooth Reflection App.
Both apps output RAW but the Smooth Reflection App can do it from hundred exposures rather than just three. Which gives much more post processing latitude.

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2017 at 22:25 UTC as 33rd comment
In reply to:

JonBush: Although I like the idea of adding apps to my A7II, in actual practice, the Play Memories experience (https://www.playmemoriescameraapps.com/portal/) when adding an app to the camera is a nightmare. I have added a few apps by connecting my camera to my iMac, but each time it is extremely painful. I'm not sure, but I think it might play better on a PC than a Mac, though maybe someone else can confirm this. If you get caught in the "PMCADownloader" death spiral, just walk away or you will soon find yourself throwing things. Please Sony, fix this and make it straightforward and consistent across platforms, i.e. browsers, Mac and Windows, etc. and provide clear directions that you have tested thoroughly.

I am finding the Playmemories experience very seamless and without issues.
I use it from the camera alone though. I would never even consider to install Sony software on my Mac or PC. I am using a RX100m3.

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2017 at 22:20 UTC
In reply to:

Tommi K1: There are only three things to learn from light to really master it.

1) There is a hard light
2) There is a soft light
3) Inverse Square Law

And everything else is nothing else then art, seeing and experimenting to get the wanted results by understanding the object shapes and materials with angles of the light coming.

To credit this bronco site ... in at least one setup, they used an UV light to illuminate white underwear without illuminating shadows too much.
I'd say your three topics don't cover that ;)
And I'd at least add a fourth topic, reflected ambient light.
Moreover, your inverse square law reads -2 log(d) in stops and means, light falls off much less steeply in photographer's terms.
Short, what I wanted to say is interaction of light sources is fairly tricky to understand and not just a matter of experimentation.

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2017 at 10:21 UTC
In reply to:

falconeyes: I like the How To site and examples.
However, they don't follow a minimalistic approach. I know for at least a few examples that a very similiar lightning effect can be achieved with considerably less effort (read number of light sources).

When learning, I always find it helpful to keep examples to the bare minimum in order not to obfuscate the principle. Still, this is a great resource to see how masters have achieved their photo.

I know, but I wanted to make this statement in a more subtle and precise way ;)

Link | Posted on Mar 14, 2017 at 10:18 UTC

I like the How To site and examples.
However, they don't follow a minimalistic approach. I know for at least a few examples that a very similiar lightning effect can be achieved with considerably less effort (read number of light sources).

When learning, I always find it helpful to keep examples to the bare minimum in order not to obfuscate the principle. Still, this is a great resource to see how masters have achieved their photo.

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2017 at 22:38 UTC as 11th comment | 3 replies
On article Olympus working on 8K video for Micro Four Thirds (219 comments in total)
In reply to:

Josh Leavitt: Software can only improve noise by a finite amount. The new sensor in the E-M1 II and PEN-F is great, don't get me wrong, but I really worry about MFT going beyond 20MP in resolution. If I were one of the Olympus execs, I'd propose to follow Fuji's business model in massive sensor differentiation; supporting a solid line up of Micro Four Thirds cameras, and also jumping into the 44x33 sensor market as well. A medium format sensor would be much better equipped to mitigate noise with 8K video recording. And offering high quality cameras on polar opposite ends of the sensor size spectrum would give Oly an intriguing market position.

More seriously though ...
The 44x33 market starts to get crowded, Pentax, Fuji, Hassy, Leica. Where the market is and remains full frame. For as long as the fastest equivalent lenses remain full frame. There is a reason the Leica SL isn't MF, despite their own S2 ...

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2017 at 09:24 UTC
On article Olympus working on 8K video for Micro Four Thirds (219 comments in total)
In reply to:

Josh Leavitt: Software can only improve noise by a finite amount. The new sensor in the E-M1 II and PEN-F is great, don't get me wrong, but I really worry about MFT going beyond 20MP in resolution. If I were one of the Olympus execs, I'd propose to follow Fuji's business model in massive sensor differentiation; supporting a solid line up of Micro Four Thirds cameras, and also jumping into the 44x33 sensor market as well. A medium format sensor would be much better equipped to mitigate noise with 8K video recording. And offering high quality cameras on polar opposite ends of the sensor size spectrum would give Oly an intriguing market position.

You're right.
A statement like "43 always meant to mean 4x3cm sensors" is much more credible than "44MP is easy for us".

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2017 at 09:21 UTC
On article Olympus working on 8K video for Micro Four Thirds (219 comments in total)
In reply to:

falconeyes: An 8k sensor in 4:3 aspect ratio has 44.2+ MP. µFT won't be the most economical form factor for such resolutions, taking lens cost into account (because of the excessive resolution requirement).

Hi everybody. My point actually wasn't that mFT cannot resolve 44MP. But that it isn't economical at that. The total cost (with the ever decreasing sensor cost) of body plus lens will be higher than, e.g., full frame. You see that already today with the best FT lenses.

Also, there is a difference if a lens resolves 44MP in the center at an ideal aperture, or in the typical case. Moreover, superresolution IS a lens stress test, yes, but I know of no correct comparison (MTF) with single frame tests. One caveat is sharpening which always happens as part of processing superresolution but not normally in a standard MTF test. Another caveat are non equivalent lens settings. A correct test would have to be against like an Otus or Art lens on a 42 or 50 MP body.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2017 at 09:11 UTC
On article Olympus working on 8K video for Micro Four Thirds (219 comments in total)

An 8k sensor in 4:3 aspect ratio has 44.2+ MP. µFT won't be the most economical form factor for such resolutions, taking lens cost into account (because of the excessive resolution requirement).

Link | Posted on Mar 10, 2017 at 21:20 UTC as 39th comment | 38 replies
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