Ademeion

Joined on Aug 24, 2011

Comments

Total: 59, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous123Next ›Last »

"Resolution, aliasing and light loss - why we love Bryce Bayer's baby anyway"

Who exactly loves a filter array? It sounds like you are selling them...

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2017 at 15:45 UTC as 36th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Contra Mundum: "This got us thinking: without any understanding of what strawberries look like, how well would a camera's auto white balance cope with the significant color cast in this image?"

Wrong thinking. It really has nothing to do with strawberries. Any abstract shapes would look the same way. You can cut and enlarge any portion which appears red, and it will still appear red as long as there is a teal surrounding, though no strawberries can be recognized. It's the color subtraction that the brain does to 'normalize' the white balance of the whole picture. If you cut a smaller portion with a uniform color and it will no longer appear red.

Are you sure the fact that we know them to be red berries isn't having a part on the effect?

Link | Posted on Mar 3, 2017 at 16:39 UTC
In reply to:

tko: No drone under the FAA weight limit needs to be registered. There is nothing special about a short range or limited flying time. Even if they don't have to be registered, they still have to met the drone laws. Meaning, you could get arrested for flying one of these things at a National Park, a National Monument, too close to a building, in New York, within 5 miles of an airport, at a parade, etc.

Personally, I'd rather have a 2 pound drone flying by at 200 feet above me, that a swarm of these things circling as flown by idiots trying to take their photos at famous locations.

Be prepared to bring a flyswatter.

"Personally, I'd rather have a 2 pound drone flying by at 200 feet above me, that a swarm of these things circling as flown by idiots trying to take their photos at famous locations. "

What about a couple of them flown by non-idiot people in a place where it's permitted? (just trying to make your comparison less apples-to-oranges).

Link | Posted on Mar 3, 2017 at 16:18 UTC
In reply to:

trungtran: People lost their loved ones, homes and jobs. Who gives a rat ass about you waiting for your unicorn camera. Use what you have now, if it doesn't meet your needs, find a new hobby.

"Who gives a rat ass about you waiting for your unicorn camera."

Those who work in the damaged factories and their families?

Link | Posted on Jan 29, 2017 at 14:40 UTC
On article Hasselblad CEO Oosting to leave next week (164 comments in total)
In reply to:

MrBrightSide: If this were an American company buying Hasselblad we know that the executives of the acquiring company would loot the pension fund, lay off the most talented members of the staff, load up the company with an unpayable amount of debt, cheat the sales force out of their commissions, and then award themselves obscenely high bonuses before shutting the company down.
Maybe the purchase by DJI is a good thing?

"How do you think it was created in the first place?"

By hard work, innovation and the will to build something. Robbery wasn't a contributing factor; those who built the country fought against it.

"Companies die, as people do."

There are good and bad ways to die.

Link | Posted on Jan 28, 2017 at 19:40 UTC
On article Hasselblad CEO Oosting to leave next week (164 comments in total)
In reply to:

MrBrightSide: If this were an American company buying Hasselblad we know that the executives of the acquiring company would loot the pension fund, lay off the most talented members of the staff, load up the company with an unpayable amount of debt, cheat the sales force out of their commissions, and then award themselves obscenely high bonuses before shutting the company down.
Maybe the purchase by DJI is a good thing?

"And yet, the GDP per capita in China is about 1/7 of that in the US, behind even Mexico."

Do you think the type of ownership MrBrightSide talks about is helping to keep the situation that way?

Link | Posted on Jan 28, 2017 at 06:07 UTC

"Along with vinyl records, slide film, and 1980s video game consoles, instant prints are doing their part to drive the retro revolution."

Revolution? In what sense? "Warming the past" would be a more fitting description (not that there's anything wrong with that). I'd like DPReview to take the stance of not hyping things.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2017 at 12:47 UTC as 3rd comment
On article HMD Global releases Nokia 6 Android smartphone (42 comments in total)
In reply to:

halfwaythere: Actually it's a low mid ranger priced like a mid ranger. My bet is this will flop because they're betting too much on the Nokia brand.

"...that said, it's kind of weird to put that processor in an otherwise much better specced phone."

Lett's wait and see. Perhaps they have optimized the software well, and the phone is fast enough. If that's how it is, it's better to use that money for something else, for example better build quality and quality ontrol.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2017 at 12:31 UTC
On article HMD Global releases Nokia 6 Android smartphone (42 comments in total)
In reply to:

nicolaiecostel: Looks like a Samsung S6 edge. I really hope Nokia's new phones will not just be copies of established models, made by foxconn.

I bought an A6 2016 and I want a good reason to drop it and buy Nokia again.

At least the following executives of HMD Global are former Nokia people (and Finns, as you can tell from their names):

Arto Nummela, CEO
Anssi Rönnemaa, Chief Finance and Commercial Officer
Jari Koljonen, General Counsel
Juho Sarvikas, Chief Product Officer
Pekka Rantala, Chief Marketing Officer
Pia Maria Kantola, Chief Operating Officer
Tiina Topal, VP Human Resources

This information comes from the HMD Global web site

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2017 at 12:17 UTC
In reply to:

User7722680286: It is clearly stated as one man's opinion and everyone is entitled to that! What's the problem. He is entitled to give his opinion, just as some commenters are now doing. A lot of hubbub over nothing! What's the big deal?

"It is clearly stated as one man's opinion and everyone is entitled to that! What's the problem. He is entitled to give his opinion, just as some commenters are now doing."

You don't seem to be able to make up your mind. Are the commenters allowed to present their opinion or not?

"A lot of hubbub over nothing! What's the big deal?"

"A very misleading opinion (that people expect to be based on facts) that can hurt the businesses of many professional photograpers and misguide their future clients presented on an influencial magazine. That's the big deal."

Link | Posted on Dec 30, 2016 at 05:44 UTC
In reply to:

Damo83: I'm curious to know where these counterfeits are sold. Perhaps Canon can advise so that consumers may steer clear.

"The most worrying and dangerous is -- fake medicine--."

Another worrying thing is that even if your medicine was manufactured by the company that's name is on the label, the research data that was used to get the medicine approved is more and more often faked or distorted. There are many legal ways to make the research data say what you want–any data will surrender when tortured enough–, and if that doesn't give satisfying results, you don't easily get caught of outright falsifying the data – especially if you outsource the dirty work (and medical research is commonly outsourced nowadays). The result of this are medicines which don't work as advertised and/or which hurt you more than it says on the label.

Link | Posted on Dec 17, 2016 at 18:03 UTC
On article 'Ethereal' takes you to Iceland in 4K (81 comments in total)
In reply to:

David Bourke: Is it just me, but something seems very synthetic about the footage. Everything is too sharp and contrasty, like the TV's when you walk into Costco. The classic "shot on video camera look" from the days of TV soap operas.

This is perhaps the best video of this sort that I have seen, and still I think you are right. At the edit phase a little too much contrast was added and colour too, I think (although I haven't seen the colours with my own eyes as they were). Not much, but anyway. Perhaps this is partly because of the current limitations in presenting the real dynamic range and colours cameras can capture. People are trying to get more out of the limited range that is available.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2016 at 20:08 UTC
In reply to:

Johannes Zander: "...two-dimensional metal materials."
Is that even possible in reality or only mathematicaly possible?

The error (or bad writing) seems to be in the original article. The original research linked there seems to be about putting several layers of 2D materials (not many atoms thick) on 1D wires. The source article twists that into this:

- "The team at UCF has experimented with applying newly discovered two-dimensional materials only a few atoms thick to supercapacitors"

That's of course wrong, and that's what you have been defending. The 2D materials used are not "only a few atoms thick", they are one atom thick.

Link | Posted on Nov 25, 2016 at 11:57 UTC
In reply to:

Johannes Zander: "...two-dimensional metal materials."
Is that even possible in reality or only mathematicaly possible?

@ Badi

"The analogy might be bad, if you don't like it, that's ok :)"

It's not about me liking it or not; it just isn't a good analogy (and I don't mean to be unfriendly when I say that).

According to the article the material isn't a single layer one, so from which point of view you do you think the term 2D material is correct?

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2016 at 15:07 UTC
In reply to:

Johannes Zander: "...two-dimensional metal materials."
Is that even possible in reality or only mathematicaly possible?

"it's a technical term... you know as the "computer mouse" is a device you click on with a wire tail (probably future generations will not understand why it was called a mouse in the first place) and not a real rodent :)"

Sorry, but that's a very bad analogy.

"Two-dimensional" in this context must come from a marketing person. No self respecting scientist or researcher would use that. Researchers behind this technology probably did a face palm when they heard it.

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2016 at 09:04 UTC
In reply to:

mike emerson: Tunnel after tunnel of equipment and loads of wires...probably one of the most boring videos of the ISS ever made. Plus a terrible choice of music compounds the problem.

I liked the video, so I guess boringness is in the eye of the beholder. I also find the music suitably otherwordly.

Out of interest, what's the most interesting video you have seen of the ISS.? I'd like to see a good and different one.

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2016 at 10:31 UTC
On article BenQ announces 32" 4K high dynamic range monitor (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

digidog: The last attribute photographers need in a display is HDR! Not if they want to soft proof output to a print. The contrast ratio's are far too high as they are. Few displays provide internal calibration over the contrast ratio too. Stick with Eizo, NEC SpectraView.

I always look for better image quality, and never print my photos anymore. Regardless of the photo, I prefer to look at it on a high quality screen than as a print. So all my photos stay in digital form nowadays. Actually I don't personally know anyone who thinks that printed photos look better.

I'm convinced that in the future we'll have cameras and displays that can reproduce the whole dynamic range of our eyes, and I'm exited about every step that takes us closer to that future.

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2016 at 20:33 UTC
In reply to:

rfsIII: Excuse my ignorance, but what did sensor makers use for conductors before they used copper wire? And have they switched to copper all of a sudden? And shouldn't they be using silver or graphene if they want max conductivity?

Silver isn't that expensive in tiny amounts that would be used on a sensor (I have no idea, if using silver actually would make sense). Currently one gram costs 55 cents. Making silver very pure raises the price somewhat, but the same applies to copper. On cheap chips that are produced in massive quantities material costs matter more, of course.

I don't know about camera sensors, but computer CPU's used to use aluminum for wiring not so long ago. Changing to copper was a big jump, and perhaps copper works so good that there's no need to change it now. Developing the manufacturing process for a new material also costs huge amounts of money, so it will be done only when it has to be done.

Link | Posted on Oct 6, 2016 at 22:57 UTC
In reply to:

A Owens: Wow, a mirrorless camera with a fast intuitive UI, a lens option for any application, great AF and no frippery. Who the heck is going to buy that?

"Wow, a mirrorless camera with a fast intuitive UI, a lens option for any application, great AF and no frippery. Who the heck is going to buy that?"

I wonder why a strawmannish comment like this gets so many likes. Nobody said that this camera won't sell. Also the native lens selection is just adequate, and "no frippery" seems to tell that you are a little short of selling points.

Time will tell how well EOS M5 sells, but potential buyers are going to compare the camera to others in the same class, and while that comparison does not look actually bad to EOS M5, it realistically doesn't look very good either. The name Canon will help, but how much?

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 02:46 UTC
On article Modern Mirrorless: Canon EOS M5 Review (1630 comments in total)
In reply to:

caravan: Will they ever have the courage to remove the fake prisum hump?

No, that's not "the EVF". Only a small part of it is.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2016 at 22:18 UTC
Total: 59, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous123Next ›Last »