Ultimax

Lives in Australia Sydney, Australia
Works as a Medical Imaging Manager
Joined on Apr 5, 2009

Comments

Total: 36, showing: 1 – 20
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Nice image. I hope most of the negative comments from people weren't made too hastily. Have a look at Michael's webpage and take some time to look at "Breath of the Dolomites". A lot of effort went into this and thank you for giving us a peak at Micheal's work DPR.

Link | Posted on Dec 3, 2017 at 13:52 UTC as 30th comment
In reply to:

sirhawkeye64: Nikon has been doing this for a bit now with the D500 (and possibly others). This isn't new, and to be honest, if you have learned your camera's buttons after a few months of use, this doesn't matter much to many people I'm sure. This is a "feature" that's more geared towards newbies so they can find the buttons in the dark, but I would think most enthusiasts (and pros) would have memorized their buttons on their cameras to a point where they don't even have to look at the camera to make changes (other than to navigate through menus).

I guess in a way (and this is not meant as a jab directly at Canon users) this shows that Canon can't think of anything new for the moment so they issue a press release about illuminated buttons just to stay in the news I guess.

And to their comment about light leakage, at least internally, I would think as long as the mirror box and sensor compartment are completely sealed from light leaks, this isn't a big deal regarding the new lighted buttons.

Thanks, light leakage was temporary issue with the first batch of 5Dmk3. I had one and caused many issues with astro and long low light exposures. Sent it into Canon and they put the high tech tape over the offending leakage area under the top cover which fixed the issue. Adding illumination to cameras is nice but not necessary with these buttons. Let's face it this is the 4th generation of the 5D not to have this illuminated 5 buttons and we've servived (opinion only :)). I hang around a few night photographers and we like the idea of less light coming off our camera bodies to the extent we tape the red LED and switch off or cover our screens. I bit extreme but we may do exposures over 3-4 hours and it's just basically being aware of those around us. Thanks for your comment re potential light leakage.

Link | Posted on Nov 27, 2017 at 22:54 UTC
In reply to:

sirhawkeye64: Nikon has been doing this for a bit now with the D500 (and possibly others). This isn't new, and to be honest, if you have learned your camera's buttons after a few months of use, this doesn't matter much to many people I'm sure. This is a "feature" that's more geared towards newbies so they can find the buttons in the dark, but I would think most enthusiasts (and pros) would have memorized their buttons on their cameras to a point where they don't even have to look at the camera to make changes (other than to navigate through menus).

I guess in a way (and this is not meant as a jab directly at Canon users) this shows that Canon can't think of anything new for the moment so they issue a press release about illuminated buttons just to stay in the news I guess.

And to their comment about light leakage, at least internally, I would think as long as the mirror box and sensor compartment are completely sealed from light leaks, this isn't a big deal regarding the new lighted buttons.

Good comment, but be aware you might get told off by landscaper1 below. I shared the same opinion of knowing where the buttons are and illuminating them wasn't as important as possibly a tilt screen. He took it really personally. Not a bad piece from a non-Canon user :)

Link | Posted on Nov 27, 2017 at 06:29 UTC
In reply to:

Ultimax: Don't need illuminated buttons, should know where 5 buttons are located on this level of camera and low and behold when you press it the correct screen menu appears. Get a decent head torch and put the R&D into a tilt screen.

Hey chill out there @ landscaper1 your comment really didn't add any value unless it was just to attack me. If so you achieved just that, kudos to you. Yes I made a personal comment and forgive me for having an opinion which wasn't meant to be directed at you or any other Canon user that uses the similar 5 buttons found at the rear fo the camera. Though I see from your gear list that you own a 5DMk4, I am sorry you haven't learnt where the 5 buttons reside and what they are used for in the dark, it must be really upsetting you by your directed comment at me. But there are some great online forums and tutorials that may illuminate you.
"Believe me, there most likely are plenty of people you know who are grateful that they aren't just like you." Believe me you must be proud of that comment. You don't know me or the people I know in the photography world. If you did you might find some of my friends and I are quite friendly and pleasant unlike your comment.

Link | Posted on Nov 26, 2017 at 09:30 UTC

Don't need illuminated buttons, should know where 5 buttons are located on this level of camera and low and behold when you press it the correct screen menu appears. Get a decent head torch and put the R&D into a tilt screen.

Link | Posted on Nov 25, 2017 at 04:08 UTC as 11th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

privater: Thinkpad used to do that. red dot on every bag

Red dot = payday for potential thieves

Link | Posted on Nov 23, 2017 at 03:02 UTC
In reply to:

LightCatcherLT: what amazes me is that everyone thinks it's Panasonic innovation, while it was Olympus that introduced this feature almost 3 years ago in Olympus E-M5 mk2.

I don't think everyone does think it's a Panasonic innovation, "As with similar technologies from Ricoh and Olympus..." is mentioned at the start of the article.

Link | Posted on Nov 15, 2017 at 09:38 UTC
In reply to:

Reilly Diefenbach: Gentlemen, it may seem as though I care what software you use or how you feel about the discontinuation of LR standalone. I really don't. The only trolling going on around here is the torrent of foulmouthed adolescent fury aimed at Adobe. You're all going to use your existing versions until they rot or get with the Adobe program or use some other software, all of which will fall short of CC in one aspect or another. Your loss entirely. Adobe's decision has been made and their stock is up $25 since the announcement. Does that fact increase your ire? Do I make you angry? Can't afford ten bucks a month for a hobby or profession you claim to enjoy/rely on?
Sorry, not sorry! (T Blair)

Sorry couldn't fit in attachment. http://www.capturemag.com.au/latest/adobe-backflips-on-lightroom?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Newsletter+Wed+25+October+2017&utm_content=Newsletter+Wed+25+October+2017+CID_9f1f912d5802bc9f5cbf8facf8796e36&utm_source=Email+marketing+software&utm_term=Read+more

Link | Posted on Oct 25, 2017 at 12:23 UTC
In reply to:

Reilly Diefenbach: Gentlemen, it may seem as though I care what software you use or how you feel about the discontinuation of LR standalone. I really don't. The only trolling going on around here is the torrent of foulmouthed adolescent fury aimed at Adobe. You're all going to use your existing versions until they rot or get with the Adobe program or use some other software, all of which will fall short of CC in one aspect or another. Your loss entirely. Adobe's decision has been made and their stock is up $25 since the announcement. Does that fact increase your ire? Do I make you angry? Can't afford ten bucks a month for a hobby or profession you claim to enjoy/rely on?
Sorry, not sorry! (T Blair)

It all comes back down to we were deceived as the attached article from 2013 shows. We were lead to believe by Adobe that a stand alone version would be on offer indefinitely. We the owners of LR and it's derivatives/upgrades kept investing and believing in Adobe. We are allowed to be angry and go through the different stages of KR.. as you eluded to in a previous post, anger being a stage and possibly acceptance. If not those who can't accept will vote with their feet. We may or may not stay with Adobe but I personally am angry at being deceived, good product or not, 10/mth or not (In Australia we pay more for some reason to download from the same server, but that's another gripe..). BTW you don't make me angry as some of your comments are valid and it's refreshing to read from someone so passionate about the Adobe offering. I respect your views, I don't expect you to accept some other posts here, but maybe respect some here are coming to terms with being duped or deceived by Adobe.

Link | Posted on Oct 25, 2017 at 12:22 UTC
On article RIP Lightroom 6: Death by subscription model (1633 comments in total)

Agree totally, Mr Richard Butler can you and your DPR team do a comparison of alternative software to LR in a matrix form as you do for new equipment and I am sure the people will vote with their feet. To see a comparison for a great stand alone alternative would most beneficial.

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2017 at 22:53 UTC as 525th comment | 1 reply
On article RIP Lightroom 6: Death by subscription model (1633 comments in total)

Well said. Have been a fan of Adobe LR since its conception. Would be interesting to see if Adobe actually read this well written piece and responded to those out here in the real world (their customers) and addressed what we really want, we want a choice. LR6 may be the end of the line and my relationship with Abobe. By the way am also happy to pay more for the stand alone LR than my counterparts in the US... :)

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2017 at 22:44 UTC as 532nd comment
In reply to:

steve ohlhaber: No aircraft in that area?

Good point. It sounded like 1 x prop and 2 x jets from the sound track. I guess if the balloon and gear got sucked into an engine I'm sure flight crew and passengers would get a unique experience viewing the eclipse. Hopefully this was well planned and FAA knew about this. If not imagine many more of us launching our gear to high altitude, the numbers of something going wrong could start to increase!

Link | Posted on Aug 26, 2017 at 05:16 UTC
On article Photo story of the week: Torment (74 comments in total)
In reply to:

matthew saville: This is one of the many recent instances in which I believe a 4:5 crop would have significantly enhanced a vertical landscape image. I've lost count of how many landscape shooters, even talented pros, never think to use this crop, probably simply because they can't bring themselves to throw away image data, or depart from what they originally saw through their viewfinder.

75-90% of the time, though, vertical landscape shots just don't work well at 2:3.

In this case, I'd crop the bottom just above the weird hole that looks distracting, and then whatever strip of sky also has to go in order to achieve 4:5, then so be it.

Maybe it's just a pet peeve and personal taste of mine...

Thank you Matthew for the explanation. Appreciate you making the time to reply. Might read up on Galen Rowell!

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2017 at 07:19 UTC
On article Photo story of the week: Torment (74 comments in total)
In reply to:

Trundling: The name "Torment" doesn't do it justice. He should've called it "Overphotoshopped Nature Photograph that I Want to Win Some Award, Anything Really Please".

Please post an official apology to Erez citing my images as a benchmark. Though please let us know how his image is "Overphotoshopped" or I may start believing that the mythical troll might actually exist.

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2017 at 12:41 UTC
On article Photo story of the week: Torment (74 comments in total)
In reply to:

Trundling: The name "Torment" doesn't do it justice. He should've called it "Overphotoshopped Nature Photograph that I Want to Win Some Award, Anything Really Please".

How do you know the image is "Overphotshopped"? The photographer has stacked the images for better DOF and probably pimped the image as we all do in a post processing software package. The photographer has used in the field ND filter and gone the trouble of doing the leg work to get multi exposures to stack them. Also what award is the photographer trying to win? If it's an award on DPR than it's to share our work and see what others are trying to achieve out there for inspiration, ideas.... Please post some images in your gallery to give us some idea of your raw and not "Overphotoshopped" images.

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2017 at 11:38 UTC
On article Photo story of the week: Torment (74 comments in total)
In reply to:

matthew saville: This is one of the many recent instances in which I believe a 4:5 crop would have significantly enhanced a vertical landscape image. I've lost count of how many landscape shooters, even talented pros, never think to use this crop, probably simply because they can't bring themselves to throw away image data, or depart from what they originally saw through their viewfinder.

75-90% of the time, though, vertical landscape shots just don't work well at 2:3.

In this case, I'd crop the bottom just above the weird hole that looks distracting, and then whatever strip of sky also has to go in order to achieve 4:5, then so be it.

Maybe it's just a pet peeve and personal taste of mine...

My "personal taste" it's a great image. The photographer has presented an image in their artistic way worts and all. I'm very interested in "75-90% of the time, though, vertical landscape shots just don't work well at 2:3." Please forward where I can find and read more about this data.

Link | Posted on Jul 23, 2017 at 09:54 UTC
On article Astrophotography with the Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art lens (77 comments in total)

Very good review. I was thinking about either the Sigma Art 14mm or the Samyang Premium MF 14mm F2.4 as a wide astro photography lens. Is the any chance of there being a review of the Samyang Premium MF 14mm F2.4 with similar content to this great review?

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 14:40 UTC as 24th comment

Very good review. I was thinking about either the Sigma Art 14mm or the Samyang Premium MF 14mm F2.4 as a wide astro photography lens. Is the any chance of there being a review of the Samyang Premium MF 14mm F2.4 with similar content to this great review?

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2017 at 14:37 UTC as 9th comment

Some of us may remember Robert Landsburg who died close to the blast of Mount St Helens. What he did was to keep photographing the blast as it approached enveloping him, ultimately taking his life. Robert by reports managed to rewind his film, place the lens cap back onto his lens and than protect his camera with his body. National Geographic ran the story and his processed film leading to a very memorable and graphic article. If it's good enough for National Geographic to process Robert's images and publish, it's good enough for Kati Dimoff. Well done Kati!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Landsburg

Link | Posted on Jun 28, 2017 at 09:45 UTC as 7th comment

@ Erez Marom. Thank you for sharing your experience on this unique bit of glass. You did make it clear that your article wasn't going to be about the technical and more about your experience and how it may challenge our thinking on very wide FOV. For that, an excellent article and images.

Link | Posted on May 7, 2017 at 12:25 UTC as 38th comment
Total: 36, showing: 1 – 20
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