G Davidson

Lives in Japan Kashiwa, Japan
Works as a Teacher
Joined on Jan 14, 2007
About me:

Future plan- to make books with my photos fused with poetry. At the moment, they are in online galleries and photo-blogs, like-

http://daylifepics.blogspot.com/
http://momentsofinfinity.blogspot.com/

Equipment-

Nikon D300,
Nikon D5100
Nikon D3100
Panasonic LX5
Canon G9

SB-800 Flash
Velbon QHD-41 Monopod

Lenses-

Note- I try to stick to 'bright' lenses, so as to control the depth of field and to have a brighter image in the viewfinder, though for traveling and ultra-wide angles I compromise on this.

Nikon 24mm f/2.8D.......................(street photography, walk-around)
Nikon 28mm f/2.8D.......................(events, walk-around)
Nikon 35mm f/1.8 D.....................(my other walk-around)
Nikon 50mm f/1.4D.......................(low light and portraits)
Nikon 17-55mm f/2.8 DX................(events, weddings)
Nikon 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 VR..........(for traveling light)
Nikon 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6 VR........(travel)
Nikon 35-70mm f/2.8D...................(my DX portrait zoom)
Nikon 70-300mm f/4-5.6 VRII.........(nature, travel, candids)
Nikon 80-200mm f/2.8 ED AF..........(candids, nature)

Tokina 12-24mm f/4 ATX Pro-DX.......(wide landscapes, events)
Sigma 50mm f/1.4 HSM....................(portraits, details, bokeh, low-light)
Tamron 90mm SP AF f/2.8 Di...........(macro with amazing, beautiful bokeh)

I recently sold on my Nikon 24-50mm AF, Nikon 70-300mm ED AF and Tokina 28-70mm AT-X AF SV, as they are not so useful on DX and their ranges are covered better by the lenses above.

Most Wanted Lenses-

70-200mm VR
85mm f/1.4D
17-55mm f/2.8 AF-S DX Nikon/ another equivalent zoom for DX, like the Tamron 17-50mm version

Comments

Total: 258, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Apple unveils iPhone 7 and dual-cam iPhone 7 Plus (946 comments in total)
In reply to:

Morpho Hunter: Oh . wow .. those earphones are a muggers' delight! Why? . you may say ..... they are sooo expensive. The mugger dudes will grab your drop earing looking earphones (at £159.00 per pair .. I cannot believe that) and sell them to their local pub/ drug dealer for £20.00 or less). However, I have to ask .. who the hell will be brave enough to wear those earphones in public? (Does anyone agree with me?)

(iPhone itself)

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2016 at 11:27 UTC
On article Apple unveils iPhone 7 and dual-cam iPhone 7 Plus (946 comments in total)
In reply to:

Morpho Hunter: Oh . wow .. those earphones are a muggers' delight! Why? . you may say ..... they are sooo expensive. The mugger dudes will grab your drop earing looking earphones (at £159.00 per pair .. I cannot believe that) and sell them to their local pub/ drug dealer for £20.00 or less). However, I have to ask .. who the hell will be brave enough to wear those earphones in public? (Does anyone agree with me?)

Hate to say it... But wouldn't the iPhobe itself be a lot more valuable?

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2016 at 11:26 UTC
In reply to:

MeganV: It looks tantalizingly close, to me.

Unfortunately, Apple's persistent need to stupefy and sandbox everything throws a few critical, structural roadblocks in the way.

(1) Screen color / brightness calibration still isn't possible, unless you duck back-and-forth into apps like Spyder gallery. How can you edit (or create), seriously, if you can't trust your screen? It's crazy that they'd put all that work into the feel and precision of the "pencil" and then *not* offer a way to calibrate color. Is it a real artist's tool or not?

(2) We need access to the file system. I've never understood why siloing files away in individual app repositories is "easier" than allowing *me* to organize them in folders of *my* choosing. "Real artists ship"--i.e., they create *a lot* of files that they need to organize.

(3) Until the iCloud (or Dropbox or Google Drive) is as fast as a connected SSD, we need a way to mount a real drive. Disallowing it seems so arbitrary!

Well said, it sounds like the power and screen quality are there, but such essentials are for some reason 'locked up'. I can't really understand why they'd market this as for professionals but still treat it as a consumption-oriented device this way.

Perhaps they're worried about cannibalizing their Mac sales? It seems a little silly to hold it back this way even so.

Link | Posted on Oct 3, 2015 at 07:33 UTC
On article Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G7 (497 comments in total)
In reply to:

onlooker: So does anyone know for sure which generation sensor this is? Is it the same as GX7?

The only real lack in the G6 for me is it's older sensor, with a lot of noise/noise reduction needed at higher ISOs. With the 4k, this looks like a winner, a 'mini GH4' for the rest of us.

Link | Posted on May 20, 2015 at 04:54 UTC
On article Opinion: Bring on the 70-200mm equivalents (347 comments in total)

One little detail to add is the extra width that starting at 50mm (being 75mm equivalent) gives on APS-C. I often find 70mm (105mm equivalent) too long as a starting point and too far from 'normal'.

I do agree that those shorter zooms, or their f/4 cousins, look a lot more manageable. I often find myself using my 70-300mm VR instead, which really doesn't compare optically.

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2014 at 13:18 UTC as 109th comment
On article Photokina 2014 Video: The Samsung NX1 (96 comments in total)
In reply to:

WACONimages: Samsung is on the roll! Probably pro Canon & Nikon shooters will laugh at first, but if this company will keep invest and innovate as they do now. They will have a bright future.

Love that different brands take different approaches. I use to be a Canon(pro) shooter for a long time. Two years ago I moved radical to m4/3. Not perfect, but it does the job way beter as expected. Although some subject like fast sports are a real challenge. Samsung, Sony, Olympus, Panasonic etc all seem to be more innovative als Nikon/Canon lately. N/C both have still great gear, but every time I moved up to the 'new' camera, it was better, but I wasn't trilled.

I'd have to agree. The sheer level of new features in this camera, or in other mirrorless designs isn't something Nikon orCanon can match with their updated models. Their autofocus seems to be improving a lot, but it's basically a better version of the same camera each time.

I think mirrorless gives so much freedom in terms of design. It's just a question of whether they can have a total product that stands up and here, especially if you want a larger sensor, they often fail to check all the boxes. This Samsung could really shake up the market- if the AF, IQ and general usability are up there.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2014 at 22:46 UTC
In reply to:

Poweruser: "VC" is a built in breaking point. The more stuff in a lens, the more likely something will fail and turn the whole thing into a paper weight.

Completely! Sometimes I want to use a low shutter speed, to make a waterfall look smoother or to convey movement. Sometimes it just gets dark. Even more so, it's invaluable for tripod-less video, which I suspect is the main reason for it's inclusion here.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2014 at 09:25 UTC
In reply to:

Poweruser: "VC" is a built in breaking point. The more stuff in a lens, the more likely something will fail and turn the whole thing into a paper weight.

It can be repaired, like the AF mechanisms. Nothing but broken glass need end a lens' life.

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2014 at 22:56 UTC
On article Nikon D750: What you need to know (114 comments in total)
In reply to:

G Davidson: Full frame cameras are basically expensive, but this ticks a lot of relevant boxes for Nikon users, without breaking the bank too much. I expect a lot of pros will use this who don't need to step up to the D810/D4S models, mainly because of the AF capabilities, but also the advantage of being pretty light. I love the low-light AF capabilities and tilting screen, so flexible for many situations.

It's still a conservative camera though- no touch-screen, no IBIS, slow autofocus in video or live-view and of course (like most cameras), lacking 4k video. I sometimes wonder how long Nikon's approach can compete with their more technology-driven rivals.

Thank you for your informative reply. The only touchscreen camera I've personally used is the Panasonic G6, which I do find effective (especially the use of the screen to change focus point), but like you say, most manufacturers are keeping their 'serious' cameras free from them. I think this is partly a traditional thing, though, as it is something that could always be turned off and is very good for nested menu settings.

Regarding IBIS is interesting, I didn't realize it worked poorly in the A99. Much as I admire what Olympus has done here in their cameras, I have to admit its unlikely in a Nikon DSLR.

All that's left is their lack of on-sensor PDAF for use in video, which I do find frustrating, as the Contrast Detect is so slow and it's an area where the others are improving. Since I mostly do stills, it's not a deal breaker for me, but like a lot of people, I'm using video more and more. I am pleased to see the 1080p at 60fps though, the video quality is probably very good.

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2014 at 13:26 UTC
On article Nikon D750: What you need to know (114 comments in total)

Full frame cameras are basically expensive, but this ticks a lot of relevant boxes for Nikon users, without breaking the bank too much. I expect a lot of pros will use this who don't need to step up to the D810/D4S models, mainly because of the AF capabilities, but also the advantage of being pretty light. I love the low-light AF capabilities and tilting screen, so flexible for many situations.

It's still a conservative camera though- no touch-screen, no IBIS, slow autofocus in video or live-view and of course (like most cameras), lacking 4k video. I sometimes wonder how long Nikon's approach can compete with their more technology-driven rivals.

Link | Posted on Sep 17, 2014 at 01:24 UTC as 33rd comment | 3 replies
On article Fast and full-frame: Nikon announces 24MP Nikon D750 (406 comments in total)
In reply to:

Suhas Sudhakar Kulkarni: Looking at the specs, I wonder why would I buy this over D610 (Unless of course I have extra cash just to burn)..

The main thing is the AF speed and accuracy. I find myself using the slow live-view contrast-detect AF on the D610, just to be sure of getting the shot. Then you have some improvements for video, probably better quality with Expeed 4 processing and 60fps, plus the tilt-able screen.

All in all the best bet for FX for now unless you need the pro camera's abilities, though I'd agree the price jump is steep for similar build quality and overall features.

Link | Posted on Sep 12, 2014 at 05:18 UTC
In reply to:

G Davidson: I've been thinking of this, too, combined with HDR bracketing for dynamic range and (why not) focus bracketing, too- all in a split second. I expect faster processing is a bottleneck for now. We've barely scratched the surface of what electronics can bring to cameras.

Thank you for getting back with that information. Currently the HDR in the iPhone is pretty poor for sure, I didn't realise it was quite that limited, though. Some apps, like TrueHDR (my favourite of the various ones I've tried), can produce excellent results, even if taking their time in doing so. Much better than my Nikon camera can do in it's HDR mode.

It would be nice if some app could output a 16-bit TIFF, or even native HDR file for use later.

Link | Posted on Jun 1, 2014 at 05:05 UTC
On article Little beauty: Nordin Seruyan's macro images (352 comments in total)

These really are beautiful. I only wish I had such talent and vision.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2014 at 23:23 UTC as 67th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Henrik Herranen: Again, please, c'mon guys:
Why isn't the sensor size in the list of "Key features"? Without sensor size the f-number doesn't tell, well, much anything. As camera enthusiasts you surely know this, so why isn't sensor size anywhere in this photography oriented site's article?

Example: a 1/2.3" sensor with an f/2.2 lens still collects slightly more light over the sensor area than a 1/3" sensor with an f/1.8 lens, and has a potential for slightly better low-light performance. Leaving sensor size out of the equation is quite misleading.

I'd have to agree here. Listing the aperture relative to 35mm would be helpful, to know how much DOF control you'd have. Plus f/1.8 isn't exactly 'ultra-bright', that would be something like f/1.2, that's like calling 28mm 'ultra-wide'.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2014 at 00:42 UTC

I've been thinking of this, too, combined with HDR bracketing for dynamic range and (why not) focus bracketing, too- all in a split second. I expect faster processing is a bottleneck for now. We've barely scratched the surface of what electronics can bring to cameras.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2014 at 00:35 UTC as 4th comment | 2 replies
On article 1939: England in Color (part 2) (177 comments in total)
In reply to:

InTheMist: Fantastic collection!

I hope that someone finds my image collection in 70 or 80 years.

Another problem is the sheer size of digital collections. Who will bother to look through them, especially when everyone with even a smart phone is snapping away. What makes these special is the fact photos of the time are so rare.

Link | Posted on May 5, 2014 at 06:00 UTC
Total: 258, showing: 1 – 20
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