AndyJH

Lives in Canada Canada
Joined on May 15, 2017

Comments

Total: 35, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Jean Daniel Villiers: I don't understand, I see a Davinci resolve icon, but don't see it in the list of application above.

This is a great question. I work with Monogram and can shed some light on the answer.

In short, there are two levels of compatibility with Creative Console: first is a native software integration, and this is what we advertise for apps like Lightroom Classic, Premiere Pro, Capture One (on MacOS), and the others Chris listed in the review above. The second level is compatibility via universal standards like MIDI and HID (keyboard shortcuts and joystick actions)—this is likely what's being used with Resolve.

Even though there's not a native software integration with Resolve, you can create a profile that controls Resolve by executing keyboard shortcuts for functions like scrub, cut, insert, nudge, etc. From our experience, this works really well with the cut page in Resolve, and also with countless other apps that aren't yet integrated with Creative Console.

Link | Posted on Dec 7, 2020 at 15:26 UTC
In reply to:

mastix: ShuttlePro V2 costs only 98$ and works amazingly well......only saying.......

Honestly, we've seen our product (I work with Monogram) and a ShuttlePro side-by-side on a few workstations; the two products are kind of apples and oranges to compare, but both do great things for creative workflow.

One of the huge strengths and unique advantages of the Monogram system is the ability to have direct control of all your software sliders and parameters via dedicated hands-on dials, sliders, and/or Orbiters. ShuttlePro doesn't do that, but of course it has its own unique strengths :)

Link | Posted on Dec 4, 2020 at 17:43 UTC
In reply to:

Knock Knock Who is There: EDIT: Now i see: Monogram is formerly known as Palette Gear,
--
L̶o̶o̶k̶s̶ ̶a̶s̶ ̶i̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶i̶s̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶a̶ ̶k̶n̶o̶c̶k̶o̶f̶f̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶'̶P̶a̶l̶e̶t̶t̶e̶ ̶M̶o̶d̶u̶l̶a̶r̶'̶,̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶t̶h̶i̶s̶ ̶j̶u̶s̶t̶ ̶a̶ ̶r̶e̶b̶r̶a̶n̶d̶e̶d̶ ̶c̶h̶e̶a̶p̶e̶r̶ ̶c̶l̶o̶n̶e̶?̶
1̶0̶0̶%̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶s̶a̶m̶e̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶c̶e̶p̶t̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶e̶v̶e̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶o̶o̶k̶s̶ ̶a̶r̶e̶ ̶m̶u̶c̶h̶ ̶a̶l̶i̶k̶e̶.̶

Also I don't think 'modularity' is actually an advantage as you state in the article. Moreover I would say it is more a disadvantage as all these 'magenetic modules' fall apart easily. It is not something you take easily with you when on the road.

Another disadvantage I see is that you can't see what you programmed the buttons for. It makes its use complicated compared to the Loupedeck CT. because once you programmed the buttons for more than two applications you really don't know any longer what each of the buttons do for which app without having a hint to what it was programmed for.

@Mr Bolton — Great question RE: Linux. How our product works is that Creative Console requires the included Monogram Creator software to enable its integrations with creative software. We develop this for macOS and Windows as it's not feasible to support Linux due to the small user community (esp in Photo/Video) and the nearly endless permutations of hardware + software.

Creative Console is a USB device so it's possible to address the USB connection directly from a Linux machine if you have the right experience. I have seen some murmurs of folks doing this with Palette Gear, but nothing has been released to the wider Linux community in an app or library IIRC. And keeping in mind that a huge part of the value of what we provide is the combined hardware + software combination, it means that we recommend Creative Console to Windows and macOS users.

Link | Posted on Dec 3, 2020 at 22:05 UTC
In reply to:

Knock Knock Who is There: EDIT: Now i see: Monogram is formerly known as Palette Gear,
--
L̶o̶o̶k̶s̶ ̶a̶s̶ ̶i̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶i̶s̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶a̶ ̶k̶n̶o̶c̶k̶o̶f̶f̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶'̶P̶a̶l̶e̶t̶t̶e̶ ̶M̶o̶d̶u̶l̶a̶r̶'̶,̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶i̶s̶ ̶t̶h̶i̶s̶ ̶j̶u̶s̶t̶ ̶a̶ ̶r̶e̶b̶r̶a̶n̶d̶e̶d̶ ̶c̶h̶e̶a̶p̶e̶r̶ ̶c̶l̶o̶n̶e̶?̶
1̶0̶0̶%̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶s̶a̶m̶e̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶c̶e̶p̶t̶ ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶e̶v̶e̶n̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶l̶o̶o̶k̶s̶ ̶a̶r̶e̶ ̶m̶u̶c̶h̶ ̶a̶l̶i̶k̶e̶.̶

Also I don't think 'modularity' is actually an advantage as you state in the article. Moreover I would say it is more a disadvantage as all these 'magenetic modules' fall apart easily. It is not something you take easily with you when on the road.

Another disadvantage I see is that you can't see what you programmed the buttons for. It makes its use complicated compared to the Loupedeck CT. because once you programmed the buttons for more than two applications you really don't know any longer what each of the buttons do for which app without having a hint to what it was programmed for.

Hey, I work with Monogram. I'm glad you brought up the issue of labeling or remembering assignments—it's a really important thing to consider until you build muscle memory. We did consider this and built a feature specifically to accommodate it.

In all of the default profiles, you can press and hold either key on the core module and it pops up a virtual layout of your console and what everything is assigned to; pressing the same key quickly switches profiles.

We felt that this was superior to labeling the modules themselves, since it keeps your eyes on your screen rather than forcing you to look down at the controller.

Demo here if you're curious: https://youtu.be/hZYOY5-Bezs?t=212

Link | Posted on Dec 3, 2020 at 18:57 UTC
In reply to:

Christo256: I would keep well clear of this product due to the fact that I bought the original product only to find it was very laggy and basically they just stopped supporting it as the software developed rendering it a completely useless item!

Hi Chris, I work with Monogram and have been part of the team since Palette Gear was in its earlier days.

The fact is that we just released a free software update for all Palette owners that gives them the same software support as new Monogram customers can expect. I'm sorry you missed the news, but the fact remains that Palette Gear is still receiving software updates a full 5 years past its launch.

Furthermore, Monogram Creative Console is backwards-compatible with the Palette modules, another way we're supporting longtime customers.

If you need help getting the update or working through any issues, we're at support@monogramcc.com

Link | Posted on Dec 3, 2020 at 18:05 UTC

Olympus and Sony: "You want crazy features? Here we've got art filters, live compositing, hi-res mode, you name it we've got it"

Lomography: "Hold my syringe..."

Link | Posted on Oct 22, 2020 at 17:10 UTC as 61st comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Hachu21: Reliable, Low latency display control over wifi? Touch control and pencil included? Wow... I'm not really up-to-date on this topic, but it's a first in my book.
Do you know any other comparable options?

The closest thing on a Windows system would be a Wacom Cintiq or Wacom One, which is of course wired.

In the Mac realm, there's Sidecar (built into Catalina) and Duet display. The former is far more limited in functionality but works really reliably. The latter works incredibly poorly from my personal experience -- lots of scaling issues and lots of performance problems.

Link | Posted on Oct 1, 2020 at 13:41 UTC
In reply to:

24images: This video is an amazing piece of unbearable bullsh.t . Pathetic or funny, hard to say. A pure product of advertising word, so full of it's own importance when it's just about selling socks or people, either way.

"24images has not uploaded any photos to their gallery yet."

Hmmmm.....when are you going to share your greatness with the world, buddy?

Link | Posted on Jun 9, 2020 at 13:47 UTC
In reply to:

Robert1975: Is that the guy who persistently fakes updated date on his review pages, literally every month?
Almost all the camera & lens reviews were supposedly updated in April 2020 - there must have been an important, historical discovery concerning every single piece of photographic equipment...
You better read on!

Before today, I had never read or heard an intelligent and well-considered thought that contained the words "get a real job".

After today, I still haven't.

I hope whatever you're going through gets easier, Robert.

Link | Posted on May 11, 2020 at 18:27 UTC

In the comments: Bitter middle-aged men complaining about getting something valuable for free.

PS: Shoutout to Photography Life for putting out consistently high quality stuff, and now making it free. Worth a look, don't let the whiners dissuade you.

Link | Posted on May 11, 2020 at 14:02 UTC as 10th comment
In reply to:

WJMWJM: Having done some recent research into the field of warm LED's for normal (household) lighting, including the dim-to-warm variety (the only one that behaves truely identical to incandescent/tungsten!), I wonder why Aputure stopped at 2700K, instead of 1800K, especially if they indeed use 2 types of LED already.
(note that 1800K is also still rare/expensive for LED household lights, most end at 2200-2300, if at all (dimming from 6500 to 2700K seems more common))
.
Yes, I know 1800K is candle-light (and less than that is too warm/red, all color distinction gone below that), but if we deleted all past images taken by candle-light, quite a lot would be lost....;))
.
Now I think about this: even my F.Lux monitor 'dim-to--warm' has its minimum set at 1900K.

That said:
The only spec's mentioned in this article are color temperature and Lux....
While even the most ordinary LED household lights are *also* specified by CRI, Colour Rendering Index, cq how pure the light is, no bandwidth gaps....

Not sure you'd want anything warmer than 2700k for use other than an effect/practical. These are obviously not intended for that purpose.

2700-6500 is a nice, useful range for balancing these lights with practicals and ambient light. Might pick up a set.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2020 at 15:43 UTC
In reply to:

supersargas: "GNU Image Manipulation Program made the decision to remove its built-in mechanism to support third-party plug-ins"
source? my distro currently has more than a hundred user maintained plugins available for gimp

also, what kind of fruitcake cares about the name?

Yes, genius, you're 100% correct about the name.

Why don't you go ahead and pitch to a special education facility that they can save thousands of dollars by changing from Photoshop to..... GIMP.

Jeez, I bet that conversation will go well.

Link | Posted on Apr 1, 2020 at 19:47 UTC
In reply to:

LoneTree1: The concept is a good one. Better than a tablet and a pen or on-screen controls to some extent. I wonder if these things are actually just switches and potentiometers running software, or if they are something else? The number of connections to each panel seem to indicate they are more complex than I can see.

For reference, the hardware can send up to 150 updates/second so it'll respond as fast or faster than your monitor can display the changes.

Without seeing these reviews, my first guess is that they're from about 5 years ago before there was a lot of firmware and software optimization. Anyone who purchased back then has had a number of free performance upgrades to make everything very responsive.

The most common feedback, especially with LR Classic and C1, is that it's lag-free.

Disclaimer: I work for Monogram

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2019 at 14:33 UTC
In reply to:

Bobthearch: So I could have 47 unlabeled knobs, buttons, and sliders on my desk?
That's nuts.

Unlabeled with no reference would be nuts, absolutely. Luckily it works a bit differently in practice.

If you long-press either of the 2 keys on the core (the module with the screen), you get a screen overlay that reminds you what input is assigned to what function.

You can also colour-code the LEDs if that helps you remember.

Disclaimer: I work for Monogram

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2019 at 14:29 UTC
In reply to:

Unsubscribe me please: Kickstarter, .... aerospace grade aluminium! CNC!

They don't state the alloy number : 601 etc and ... What isn't CNC machined today that isn't cast, laminated or molded!

..Kickstarter gets the money no mater what!
YOU get to take all the risk for very little gain as you have already paid full asking price!
If it went to market, You would dictate price and viability!

Snake Oil scammers more like it!

Good folks that get caught by these lowlife scammers need to wise up on basic business stratagem. (Risk avoidance)

Barry, take a look at Palette Gear (Monogram's previous brand name), Peak Design, WANDRD, and Laowa (Venus Optics)—all well-reviewed here on DPReview.

All 4 have crowdfunded their launches through Kickstarter and all 4 have reputations for making great and unique gear. Not scamming anybody.

The fact is that while a few unscrupulous companies use Kickstarter to deliver shoddy goods, countless others are simply smaller companies that take advantage of raising funds and evaluating demand in advance so they can make more ambitious choices in product development.

All 4 that I've mentioned fit into this latter category.

Disclaimer: I work for Monogram. Shoot us an email or a message on Kickstarter if you're curious.

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2019 at 13:59 UTC
In reply to:

AndyJH: It's a shame to see Aperture support discontinued, but us photographers really are spoiled for choice. In case you're looking for an Aperture replacement, here's what I've used and enjoyed:

Apple Photos + Serif Affinity Photo is a great combo for DAM + RAW developing + Image compositing.

Adobe has their CC Photographer's plan at $10/mo—subscriptions are a touchy subject but the price is right, and LR Classic performance has gotten a lot better as of 8.x.

And finally, switching to Fuji got me using Capture One more regularly. Pro 12 is jaw-droppingly good.

On1 had some performance concerns for me too. Affinity is—IMO—the most stable and performant of the crop of low price/permanent license options.

The obstacles I found with Affinity Photo's Develop persona are these:

1. There appears to be no way to copy/paste/sync RAW adjustments between multiple open images.

2. There appears to be no way to write development metadata to a RAW file or sidecar file. If this was possible, you could retain your Develop adjustments across multiple sessions.

3. The only support for developing multiple images appears to be the Batch Process command, using a pre-defined development preset. This works to sync multiple images, but then you have to make all your iterative adjustments in the Photo persona, by adjusting the .afphoto file—not on the RAW file itself.

Don't get me wrong, Affinity is a phenomenal tool. But I approach it closer to a Photoshop equivalent, and it sounds like you're more after a Lightroom equivalent.

Link | Posted on May 2, 2019 at 17:07 UTC
In reply to:

AndyJH: It's a shame to see Aperture support discontinued, but us photographers really are spoiled for choice. In case you're looking for an Aperture replacement, here's what I've used and enjoyed:

Apple Photos + Serif Affinity Photo is a great combo for DAM + RAW developing + Image compositing.

Adobe has their CC Photographer's plan at $10/mo—subscriptions are a touchy subject but the price is right, and LR Classic performance has gotten a lot better as of 8.x.

And finally, switching to Fuji got me using Capture One more regularly. Pro 12 is jaw-droppingly good.

@piccolbo: That's exactly what you'd want Capture One or Lightroom for. Both excel at that workflow.

Based on my experience, I don't believe that's possible using Apple Photos + Affinity. The main limitation there is the Develop persona of Affinity Photo and the inability to make iterative edits across a group of photos.

Link | Posted on May 2, 2019 at 14:17 UTC

It's a shame to see Aperture support discontinued, but us photographers really are spoiled for choice. In case you're looking for an Aperture replacement, here's what I've used and enjoyed:

Apple Photos + Serif Affinity Photo is a great combo for DAM + RAW developing + Image compositing.

Adobe has their CC Photographer's plan at $10/mo—subscriptions are a touchy subject but the price is right, and LR Classic performance has gotten a lot better as of 8.x.

And finally, switching to Fuji got me using Capture One more regularly. Pro 12 is jaw-droppingly good.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2019 at 15:17 UTC as 34th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

DuxX: Yeah... show us the future with small APS-C sensor. You guys don't have future in professional photography with small sensor. For housewives to shoot recipes, cookies, kids and cats it's fine. And for travelers and bloggers it's fine too. But for professionals... seriously???

For video... I must admit X-T3 is great and capable camera. I am thinking of buying one just for that purpose. 4K with 60fps sounds tempting ;)

Credit where it's due, that's awesome work actually.

Link | Posted on Mar 29, 2019 at 16:34 UTC
In reply to:

DuxX: Yeah... show us the future with small APS-C sensor. You guys don't have future in professional photography with small sensor. For housewives to shoot recipes, cookies, kids and cats it's fine. And for travelers and bloggers it's fine too. But for professionals... seriously???

For video... I must admit X-T3 is great and capable camera. I am thinking of buying one just for that purpose. 4K with 60fps sounds tempting ;)

@DuxX no, but somehow it's funnier that you think I'm calling out your camera choice instead of your outdated and weirdly sexist comment.

In case you missed it: I'm referring to your embarrassingly archaic idea of "...housewives [who] shoot recipes, cookies, kids and cats..."

As I said before, hope to have you join us in 2019 soon!

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2019 at 23:39 UTC
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