fad

fad

Lives in United States NYC, NY, United States
Works as a Investor/Scholar-poet
Joined on Oct 2, 2005
About me:

Equipment:
Nikon D750, D810, D4s, D800, Fuji X100
14-24, 24-70, 70-200/2.8 zooms
35/1.8, 50/1.8G, 85/1.4G, 85/1.8G, 135/2D,
24-120/4 VR, 24-85G, 28-300G

Caonon 5d, 1ds mk3
70-200 2.8 IS
70-200/4 IS
70-300 DO IS
24-105/4
16-35/2.8 II

35/2
50/1.4
85/1.2 II
200/2.8

Comments

Total: 84, showing: 21 – 40
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I don't think it matters much whether this photo was faked.

Why? What makes this photo memorable is not its documentary quality, but that it captures the idea of war in general, and of this war in this place and time in particular. No one cares, outside of the photo, who the subject was. And no one is using it for forensic purposes.

The Iliad is still the supreme poem of war, even if there never were an Achilles, or a Hector, or a Priam or a Helen. Why? It captures the idea of war in all its complexity, its glory and its horror. An inferior poem that was historically accurate would not be as great.

Many of the great street photos we admire were faked. But they have artistic truth.

Now if Muybridge faked his horses or George Roger has created a fake death camp, that would be a different matter. But here the reality of what happened does not matter.

Link | Posted on Nov 3, 2013 at 13:54 UTC as 21st comment | 5 replies
On article Retro Nikon 'DF' emerges from the shadows (1392 comments in total)
In reply to:

jacketpotato: Monochrome sensor ?

Would perhaps be what Nikon sees as "Pure Photography"

Sets Df apart from D6xx D8xx not just cosmetically but also internally.

Canon does not have autofocus with face detection. It focuses on whatever is closest to the camera. That, IMHO, is not state of the art today.
That is why I have not bought one despite having a full stable of Canon lenses.

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2013 at 21:42 UTC
On article Retro Nikon 'DF' emerges from the shadows (1392 comments in total)
In reply to:

fad: Most people do not understand the benefits of pro focus/metering with 51 points on the D4/D800 --which this camera does not have.

DF has
Only 2k pixel imagining sensor, instead of 62k.
Only narrow DX style 39point AF instead of pro 51 point with wider area.

This is a down-spec'd system that will no doubt be fine for MF, and for center focus/recompose. It will be inferior for selecting focus points. And it will be much inferior for Auto-Area focus with face detection. The latter is truly excellent for action photography. I use it for street most of the time.

If Nikon had not crippled the metering/focus system from that in the D800/D4, this would be the street camera I am looking for.

Likewise, despite sharing the D4's sensor, don't expect the Df to be anywhere's as capable for low light shooting.

I guess one could say about it, faster AF than the A7, but deliberately crippled by Nikon to not compete with other models.

Jogger,
Because it is smaller, lighter, more discrete.

Henry,
The camera does not have video. All the specs, except for the how it is a 'hybrid', which is a big surprise that will be revealed at the end, and confirmation of the price, are on nikonrumors dot com website.

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2013 at 21:36 UTC
On article Retro Nikon 'DF' emerges from the shadows (1392 comments in total)

Most people do not understand the benefits of pro focus/metering with 51 points on the D4/D800 --which this camera does not have.

DF has
Only 2k pixel imagining sensor, instead of 62k.
Only narrow DX style 39point AF instead of pro 51 point with wider area.

This is a down-spec'd system that will no doubt be fine for MF, and for center focus/recompose. It will be inferior for selecting focus points. And it will be much inferior for Auto-Area focus with face detection. The latter is truly excellent for action photography. I use it for street most of the time.

If Nikon had not crippled the metering/focus system from that in the D800/D4, this would be the street camera I am looking for.

Likewise, despite sharing the D4's sensor, don't expect the Df to be anywhere's as capable for low light shooting.

I guess one could say about it, faster AF than the A7, but deliberately crippled by Nikon to not compete with other models.

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2013 at 19:03 UTC as 376th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

fad: I photograph in the streets of downtown Manhattan, around SOHO. A camera this stylish would be very practical for blending in and being accepted.

The camera we will use today is an ugly piece of retro mechanical equipment with a user interface only it's mother can love and software that is careless and no joy to use.

Let us hope that camera designers learn from this effort.

Yes, I would most definitely blend in. Because down here people value originality, uniqueness, high style and self-expression. Not looking like every other tourist, pro, student, artist. paparazzo and wannabe, not to mention gear dork, there is.

People of a creative and fashionable bent would smile to be photoed by such a camera.

Link | Posted on Oct 9, 2013 at 21:27 UTC

I photograph in the streets of downtown Manhattan, around SOHO. A camera this stylish would be very practical for blending in and being accepted.

The camera we will use today is an ugly piece of retro mechanical equipment with a user interface only it's mother can love and software that is careless and no joy to use.

Let us hope that camera designers learn from this effort.

Link | Posted on Oct 9, 2013 at 12:54 UTC as 111th comment | 4 replies

As an old fashioned guy, I don't get all the criticism. She's worked very hard, and some of the images are very good.

Now, I do think she just doesn't have quite enough artistic imagination to realize the full potential of her conceit. But how many people do? I would have liked to see more meditation on how a dress is not just an object, but something that echoes and once joined with a human body. I would like to see a meditation on how time affects both the landscape and the body, decays both, and endues both with a terrifying beauty.

But artists of that caliber are not on dpr's radar, and would not communicate to us gearheads.

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2013 at 14:11 UTC as 21st comment | 2 replies
On article Panasonic GX7 First Impressions Review (1200 comments in total)

Thanks for the effort and thought put into upgrading what dpr does so well.

No comparison can ever be perfect, I'm sure. But this is better than perfect, it is useful.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2013 at 13:59 UTC as 121st comment
On article Walker Evans' iconic 'American Photographs' turns 75 (39 comments in total)
In reply to:

AndersonPhotog: Was wondering what a modern version of his vision would look like. In my mind, the today version would seem too mundane, but in 75 years, they would probably prove to be powerful. Though I digress, because part of what makes those 75 year old prints so iconic, is the way they are produced in black and white. I cant imagine that photos 75years from now will look a lot different, in that accurate color and non degradation of digital vs film and prints will not "date" today's images in the same way film photography in the past has.

I don't think he was documenting poverty, but rather the tragic nature of the American dream. It is impossible to know how a person of his depth and seriousness would shoot today unless one shared that attribute with him, and not even then, I guess.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2013 at 19:26 UTC
On article Walker Evans' iconic 'American Photographs' turns 75 (39 comments in total)
In reply to:

reginalddwight: Evans' work for the Resettlement Administration in the 1930s represent the pinnacle of his career as a documentary photographer.

There are several historical photographs that best represent the Great Depression.

In addition to arguably the most iconic of the era, "Migrant Mother" by Dorothea Lange, the portrait of Allie Mae Burroughs by Evans superbly captures the raw anguish and uncertainty of the times.

.

Forms and shadows, especially shadows.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2013 at 19:23 UTC
On article Walker Evans' iconic 'American Photographs' turns 75 (39 comments in total)
In reply to:

reginalddwight: Evans' work for the Resettlement Administration in the 1930s represent the pinnacle of his career as a documentary photographer.

There are several historical photographs that best represent the Great Depression.

In addition to arguably the most iconic of the era, "Migrant Mother" by Dorothea Lange, the portrait of Allie Mae Burroughs by Evans superbly captures the raw anguish and uncertainty of the times.

.

These things happen. Berenice Abbott stood across the street from my townhouse in Manhattan, and carefully framed a shot that excluded it. When I saw the image, I realized that I had looked on that scene every day for years and not realized its potential, I eventually took a better shot than she did, with modern equipment and processing:

http://collections-static-2.mcny.org/Doc/MNY/Media/TR3/2/3/8/4/MNY76129.jpg

Evans was teaching at the college I went to, but I was too ignorant to care about who he was, a mere photographer. His first published images were in an early edition of Hart Crane's poem, The Bridge. Crane started writing the poem, and being friends with Evans, while living on my block, which was a notable slum south of Greenwich Village.

Evans was important also for his support of other photographers, getting people like Robert Frank a Guggenheim so he could produce his lamentable "The Americans."

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2013 at 08:30 UTC
On article Walker Evans' iconic 'American Photographs' turns 75 (39 comments in total)
In reply to:

bigdaddave: The picture of the woman is a strong picture, the others are really just 'documentary' shots of the era in which they lived and nothing special at all

It helps to buy the book. Evans' is a serious man, with a tragic vision of great depth.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2013 at 08:24 UTC
In reply to:

fad: Virginia Postrel put it well:

Ultimately, the debate about choice is not about markets but about character. Liberty and responsibility really do go together; it’s not just a platitude. The more freedom we have to control our lives, the more responsibility we have for how they turn out. In a world of constraints, learning to be happy with what you’re given is a virtue. In a world of choices, virtue comes from learning to make commitments without regrets. And commitment, in turn, requires self-confidence and self-knowledge.

“We are free to be the authors of our lives,” says Schwartz, “but we don’t know exactly what kind of lives we want to ‘write.’” Maturity lies in deciding just that.

Well, the behavior you're describing (of which many of us are guilty) is a betrayal of our commitment to photographic excellence.

But although Postrel expresses herself in existential terms, the kinds of commitment we make are both big and small. A camera is an extension of your eye, which is part of your brain, and also of your body. You should pay attention to it, as well as to your product. That is what freedom allows, and requires. In a few years, as the digital revolution matures, people will be paying less attention to equipment.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 21:50 UTC
In reply to:

deleted-13120401: Pretty sure all you need to be a 'street photographer' is to call yourself a street photographer. Better yet, International Street Photographer.

His point is that International Street Photographer is silly and pretentious.

It's like Austin Powers calling himself "International Man of Mystery."

When I was in finance, International Finance was about doing finance in different currencies, customs, languages and legal systems. It made sense to make it a specialty. What's different about International Street Photography?

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 03:46 UTC

Virginia Postrel put it well:

Ultimately, the debate about choice is not about markets but about character. Liberty and responsibility really do go together; it’s not just a platitude. The more freedom we have to control our lives, the more responsibility we have for how they turn out. In a world of constraints, learning to be happy with what you’re given is a virtue. In a world of choices, virtue comes from learning to make commitments without regrets. And commitment, in turn, requires self-confidence and self-knowledge.

“We are free to be the authors of our lives,” says Schwartz, “but we don’t know exactly what kind of lives we want to ‘write.’” Maturity lies in deciding just that.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 00:29 UTC as 78th comment | 3 replies

Choice theory does not meet the test of reasonableness. People are not clamoring for dpr to do fewer reviews, nor for Canon to make fewer cameras, nor for there to be fewer manufacturers or formats. I could probably take similar street shots with any camera every made (up to a point), but like many others I await the ILC FF mirrorless camera with interest.

My son took me to a store on a block I grew up on that had hundreds of craft beers. We had a very pleasant time, and the people who spent 20 minutes deciding what to buy did not look unhappy, but fulfilled. Our whole economy is based on the individual being free to choose, and to choose responsibly based on self-knowledge.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 00:28 UTC as 79th comment | 1 reply

35mm is not for everyone. Cartier-Bresson, who used it when needed, pointed out that there is the temptation to have elements that are out of focus and distorted and, most damningly, it is very difficult to exclude extraneous elements. I think beginners should not be directed toward that focal length. It will only frustrate them.

It's easy to take a decent 35mm that's just a tele or normal shot, in effect, with the main elements parallel to the sensor. It is very hard to take a good picture that is true wide angel, with perspective effects and effective use of 3D space and no extraneous elements.

Mr Kim's work is a good example of wide angle abuse for cheap effects. It's mostly street portraiture, which is perhaps the easiest form of SP. Doing non-environmental portraits with a 35mm or wider lens has a little too much of gimmickry and a little too little of true photographic artistry.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 00:07 UTC as 82nd comment

There is no perfect buying decision. I am a maximizer, and I know this and take it into account. That's the problem with social science, it treats people as interchangeable objects, not beings with free will and souls. So it will always be superficial.

There is no perfect street photography camera. However, when Kim says that high iso is not important, he should speak for himself. I often shoot in the evening and at night. Even in a bright sunny day you might want to shoot in a dark space you come across. That is one of the main reasons I shoot with large professional FF cameras. Another is cropping. Another is that since the environment is not controlled, a great deal of PP manipulation can be required. Also most cities are less challening that NYC, so sleepier cameras can be less of a handicap.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 00:00 UTC as 83rd comment
On article DPReview launches GearShop (316 comments in total)

GearShop may be a symptom of how hard it is for many to profit from the internet.

Dpr attracts millions of visitors, who pay nothing for the privilege.

Amazon knows how much traffic comes from dpr, and it may not be enough to justify what the dpreview staff wishes to do.

This is a problem that commercial internet sites have to deal with -how to monetize their success.

Since Gearshop provides no real benefit for the customer, I don't see how it can succeed.

Perhaps dpreview should communicate this to its members in an honest and straightforward fashion, simply say: buying from us is like buying from Amazon, but it supports the site you enjoy and rely on.

Even better, if it benefits them, and doesn't hurt us users, they could ask that we purchase gear from Amazon using a link from dpreview.

Ultimately, the Internet needs a way to charge people insignificant amounts for each access to commercial sites. What I pay for cable is ridiculous, and I use the Internet more..

Link | Posted on Jul 19, 2013 at 17:37 UTC as 28th comment | 2 replies
On article DPReview launches GearShop (316 comments in total)
In reply to:

fad: Where are the shipping, return policies and so forth?

What is the value to the consumer of Gear Shop over having a list of recommended products with links to purchasing them on Amazon? Why should we buy from you?

What states do you collect sales tax for?

So there is no benefit to us customers from using Gear Shop over Amazon?

One has to guess it was just set up to increase the paper profitability of the dpreview tentacle within the Amazon octopus, since it does nothing that a list of recommended products would not do as well.

Am I missing any benefit for customers?

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2013 at 14:40 UTC
Total: 84, showing: 21 – 40
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