fad

fad

Lives in United States NYC, NY, United States
Works as a Investor/Scholar-poet
Joined on Oct 2, 2005
About me:

Equipment:
Nikon D750, D810, D4s, D800, Fuji X100
14-24, 24-70, 70-200/2.8 zooms
35/1.8, 50/1.8G, 85/1.4G, 85/1.8G, 135/2D,
24-120/4 VR, 24-85G, 28-300G

Caonon 5d, 1ds mk3
70-200 2.8 IS
70-200/4 IS
70-300 DO IS
24-105/4
16-35/2.8 II

35/2
50/1.4
85/1.2 II
200/2.8

Comments

Total: 91, showing: 21 – 40
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On article Behind the scenes: Garry Winogrand at work (52 comments in total)
In reply to:

webrunner5: I would think about anyone of us would take a few good pictures if we had the nerve he did and took 100 thousand shots.

Yes, he is actually a very disappointing photographer, lacking insight and poetry, but leveraging a fanatical love of the craft into a number of strong images.

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2014 at 20:02 UTC
On article Behind the scenes: Garry Winogrand at work (52 comments in total)
In reply to:

RobertSigmund: I knew this movie. A pity he died so early. Maybe because of his big fat belly! :-(

There is very little relationship between obesity and mortality. What little there is is very likely the result that obesity is correlated with low socio-economic status, which has a powerful effect on mortality. The link to the NIC cites only one study (which would be worthliess without strong corroboration) that 'suggests' such small increases in risk that they are barely statistical noise.

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2014 at 20:00 UTC
On article Nikon D4s: CP+ Hands-on and interview (54 comments in total)

As a night street photographer, I have pre-ordered it. Better AF responsiveness and slightly lower noise levels will mean more keepers.

Not too many other amateurs who have a D4 will probably find it as useful.

Link | Posted on Feb 25, 2014 at 16:27 UTC as 11th comment
On article Nikon AF-S Nikkor 58mm f/1.4G review (416 comments in total)

This is a wonderful character lens, and we should be glad it exists. It specializes in smoothness/bokeh and capturing light sources at night.

Personally, I'm using the 50/1.8 as a walkaround lens and a pretty good night lens.

When my Otus finally comes, it should be a superior night/portrait/still life lens to the 58/1.4. But if AF or budget are considerations, the 58/1.4 looks pretty cool.

Link | Posted on Dec 31, 2013 at 08:32 UTC as 104th comment | 1 reply
On article DPReview Gear of the Year Part 3: Olympus OM-D E-M1 (394 comments in total)
In reply to:

Chris2210: I too owned [and loved!] the GF1 and 20 f1.7 - an ideal [for its time] large-pocket camera marrying portability with IQ that gave very little up for its convenience. But I am a relatively recent convert to the idea that a m4/3 camera might be my principal shooter and the EM1/12-40 has helped me along to that conclusion.

I've still got my 5DII and 50mm/24-105mm/ 70-200mm f2.8L. Is there a difference in image quality - yes, if you look very closely at pixel level or want wafer-thin DoF.

But there's no doubt in my mind the Olympus zoom is better than the 24-105L [which I don't think is all that fantastic]. Only the Oly software seems to be able to open the RAW files at the moment, but this is possibly the first camera I've ever had where I'm happy enough to mostly use the JPEGs.

I'm now very rarely taking out the 5DII - because as you succinctly express it it, most of the time the IQ of the EM1 is more than good enough.

I was recently at a multi-day family gathering and mostly shot with my X100 and Iphone 5s. I was really pleased to be able to get shots with my cameras that are not FF. But when I got home, and looked at the shots on my calibrated 30" Nec Multisync monitor, the richness of the LR *thumbnails* from the few D4 shots I took just blew me away. The differences were not small, and the PP possibilities were greater. These were mostly indoor available light, but not extreme.

Don't get me wrong. My favorite shot was taken with the Iphone in daylight. But if you're into art photography, FF has many more layers of richness than smaller formats. ASC and m43 and cell may indeed be suitable for most purposes, but the advantages of FF are many and subtle and instantly visible, at least to me, on a good monitor at very small sizes.

BTW, if I were buying a small system today, it would be the EM1, because it is a complete and balanced system.

Link | Posted on Dec 1, 2013 at 17:45 UTC
On article Celebrated photographer Saul Leiter dies, aged 89 (11 comments in total)

Sometimes the good die old.

Link | Posted on Nov 28, 2013 at 13:56 UTC as 11th comment
In reply to:

fad: I don't think it matters much whether this photo was faked.

Why? What makes this photo memorable is not its documentary quality, but that it captures the idea of war in general, and of this war in this place and time in particular. No one cares, outside of the photo, who the subject was. And no one is using it for forensic purposes.

The Iliad is still the supreme poem of war, even if there never were an Achilles, or a Hector, or a Priam or a Helen. Why? It captures the idea of war in all its complexity, its glory and its horror. An inferior poem that was historically accurate would not be as great.

Many of the great street photos we admire were faked. But they have artistic truth.

Now if Muybridge faked his horses or George Roger has created a fake death camp, that would be a different matter. But here the reality of what happened does not matter.

mcshan

You are easily impressed. ;~)

Link | Posted on Nov 4, 2013 at 18:37 UTC

I don't think it matters much whether this photo was faked.

Why? What makes this photo memorable is not its documentary quality, but that it captures the idea of war in general, and of this war in this place and time in particular. No one cares, outside of the photo, who the subject was. And no one is using it for forensic purposes.

The Iliad is still the supreme poem of war, even if there never were an Achilles, or a Hector, or a Priam or a Helen. Why? It captures the idea of war in all its complexity, its glory and its horror. An inferior poem that was historically accurate would not be as great.

Many of the great street photos we admire were faked. But they have artistic truth.

Now if Muybridge faked his horses or George Roger has created a fake death camp, that would be a different matter. But here the reality of what happened does not matter.

Link | Posted on Nov 3, 2013 at 13:54 UTC as 21st comment | 5 replies
On article Retro Nikon 'DF' emerges from the shadows (1391 comments in total)
In reply to:

jacketpotato: Monochrome sensor ?

Would perhaps be what Nikon sees as "Pure Photography"

Sets Df apart from D6xx D8xx not just cosmetically but also internally.

Canon does not have autofocus with face detection. It focuses on whatever is closest to the camera. That, IMHO, is not state of the art today.
That is why I have not bought one despite having a full stable of Canon lenses.

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2013 at 21:42 UTC
On article Retro Nikon 'DF' emerges from the shadows (1391 comments in total)
In reply to:

fad: Most people do not understand the benefits of pro focus/metering with 51 points on the D4/D800 --which this camera does not have.

DF has
Only 2k pixel imagining sensor, instead of 62k.
Only narrow DX style 39point AF instead of pro 51 point with wider area.

This is a down-spec'd system that will no doubt be fine for MF, and for center focus/recompose. It will be inferior for selecting focus points. And it will be much inferior for Auto-Area focus with face detection. The latter is truly excellent for action photography. I use it for street most of the time.

If Nikon had not crippled the metering/focus system from that in the D800/D4, this would be the street camera I am looking for.

Likewise, despite sharing the D4's sensor, don't expect the Df to be anywhere's as capable for low light shooting.

I guess one could say about it, faster AF than the A7, but deliberately crippled by Nikon to not compete with other models.

Jogger,
Because it is smaller, lighter, more discrete.

Henry,
The camera does not have video. All the specs, except for the how it is a 'hybrid', which is a big surprise that will be revealed at the end, and confirmation of the price, are on nikonrumors dot com website.

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2013 at 21:36 UTC
On article Retro Nikon 'DF' emerges from the shadows (1391 comments in total)

Most people do not understand the benefits of pro focus/metering with 51 points on the D4/D800 --which this camera does not have.

DF has
Only 2k pixel imagining sensor, instead of 62k.
Only narrow DX style 39point AF instead of pro 51 point with wider area.

This is a down-spec'd system that will no doubt be fine for MF, and for center focus/recompose. It will be inferior for selecting focus points. And it will be much inferior for Auto-Area focus with face detection. The latter is truly excellent for action photography. I use it for street most of the time.

If Nikon had not crippled the metering/focus system from that in the D800/D4, this would be the street camera I am looking for.

Likewise, despite sharing the D4's sensor, don't expect the Df to be anywhere's as capable for low light shooting.

I guess one could say about it, faster AF than the A7, but deliberately crippled by Nikon to not compete with other models.

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2013 at 19:03 UTC as 376th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

fad: I photograph in the streets of downtown Manhattan, around SOHO. A camera this stylish would be very practical for blending in and being accepted.

The camera we will use today is an ugly piece of retro mechanical equipment with a user interface only it's mother can love and software that is careless and no joy to use.

Let us hope that camera designers learn from this effort.

Yes, I would most definitely blend in. Because down here people value originality, uniqueness, high style and self-expression. Not looking like every other tourist, pro, student, artist. paparazzo and wannabe, not to mention gear dork, there is.

People of a creative and fashionable bent would smile to be photoed by such a camera.

Link | Posted on Oct 9, 2013 at 21:27 UTC

I photograph in the streets of downtown Manhattan, around SOHO. A camera this stylish would be very practical for blending in and being accepted.

The camera we will use today is an ugly piece of retro mechanical equipment with a user interface only it's mother can love and software that is careless and no joy to use.

Let us hope that camera designers learn from this effort.

Link | Posted on Oct 9, 2013 at 12:54 UTC as 111th comment | 4 replies

As an old fashioned guy, I don't get all the criticism. She's worked very hard, and some of the images are very good.

Now, I do think she just doesn't have quite enough artistic imagination to realize the full potential of her conceit. But how many people do? I would have liked to see more meditation on how a dress is not just an object, but something that echoes and once joined with a human body. I would like to see a meditation on how time affects both the landscape and the body, decays both, and endues both with a terrifying beauty.

But artists of that caliber are not on dpr's radar, and would not communicate to us gearheads.

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2013 at 14:11 UTC as 21st comment | 2 replies
On article Panasonic GX7 First Impressions Review (1200 comments in total)

Thanks for the effort and thought put into upgrading what dpr does so well.

No comparison can ever be perfect, I'm sure. But this is better than perfect, it is useful.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2013 at 13:59 UTC as 121st comment
On article Walker Evans' iconic 'American Photographs' turns 75 (39 comments in total)
In reply to:

AndersonPhotog: Was wondering what a modern version of his vision would look like. In my mind, the today version would seem too mundane, but in 75 years, they would probably prove to be powerful. Though I digress, because part of what makes those 75 year old prints so iconic, is the way they are produced in black and white. I cant imagine that photos 75years from now will look a lot different, in that accurate color and non degradation of digital vs film and prints will not "date" today's images in the same way film photography in the past has.

I don't think he was documenting poverty, but rather the tragic nature of the American dream. It is impossible to know how a person of his depth and seriousness would shoot today unless one shared that attribute with him, and not even then, I guess.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2013 at 19:26 UTC
On article Walker Evans' iconic 'American Photographs' turns 75 (39 comments in total)
In reply to:

reginalddwight: Evans' work for the Resettlement Administration in the 1930s represent the pinnacle of his career as a documentary photographer.

There are several historical photographs that best represent the Great Depression.

In addition to arguably the most iconic of the era, "Migrant Mother" by Dorothea Lange, the portrait of Allie Mae Burroughs by Evans superbly captures the raw anguish and uncertainty of the times.

.

Forms and shadows, especially shadows.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2013 at 19:23 UTC
On article Walker Evans' iconic 'American Photographs' turns 75 (39 comments in total)
In reply to:

reginalddwight: Evans' work for the Resettlement Administration in the 1930s represent the pinnacle of his career as a documentary photographer.

There are several historical photographs that best represent the Great Depression.

In addition to arguably the most iconic of the era, "Migrant Mother" by Dorothea Lange, the portrait of Allie Mae Burroughs by Evans superbly captures the raw anguish and uncertainty of the times.

.

These things happen. Berenice Abbott stood across the street from my townhouse in Manhattan, and carefully framed a shot that excluded it. When I saw the image, I realized that I had looked on that scene every day for years and not realized its potential, I eventually took a better shot than she did, with modern equipment and processing:

http://collections-static-2.mcny.org/Doc/MNY/Media/TR3/2/3/8/4/MNY76129.jpg

Evans was teaching at the college I went to, but I was too ignorant to care about who he was, a mere photographer. His first published images were in an early edition of Hart Crane's poem, The Bridge. Crane started writing the poem, and being friends with Evans, while living on my block, which was a notable slum south of Greenwich Village.

Evans was important also for his support of other photographers, getting people like Robert Frank a Guggenheim so he could produce his lamentable "The Americans."

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2013 at 08:30 UTC
On article Walker Evans' iconic 'American Photographs' turns 75 (39 comments in total)
In reply to:

bigdaddave: The picture of the woman is a strong picture, the others are really just 'documentary' shots of the era in which they lived and nothing special at all

It helps to buy the book. Evans' is a serious man, with a tragic vision of great depth.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2013 at 08:24 UTC
In reply to:

fad: Virginia Postrel put it well:

Ultimately, the debate about choice is not about markets but about character. Liberty and responsibility really do go together; it’s not just a platitude. The more freedom we have to control our lives, the more responsibility we have for how they turn out. In a world of constraints, learning to be happy with what you’re given is a virtue. In a world of choices, virtue comes from learning to make commitments without regrets. And commitment, in turn, requires self-confidence and self-knowledge.

“We are free to be the authors of our lives,” says Schwartz, “but we don’t know exactly what kind of lives we want to ‘write.’” Maturity lies in deciding just that.

Well, the behavior you're describing (of which many of us are guilty) is a betrayal of our commitment to photographic excellence.

But although Postrel expresses herself in existential terms, the kinds of commitment we make are both big and small. A camera is an extension of your eye, which is part of your brain, and also of your body. You should pay attention to it, as well as to your product. That is what freedom allows, and requires. In a few years, as the digital revolution matures, people will be paying less attention to equipment.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2013 at 21:50 UTC
Total: 91, showing: 21 – 40
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