Brian Slater

Lives in United States United States
Joined on May 14, 2002

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From http://www.imore.com/apple-usb-c-thunderbolt-3-price-cut

"Apple is cutting the price of their USB-C adapters by up to half, third party USB-C and Thunderbolt 3 peripherals they sell by 25%, and SanDisk's USB-C SD card reader by 40%. All in an effort to ease the pain of pro customers with legacy peripherals upset by Apple's rapid move to USB-C / Thunderbolt 3 exclusivity on the 2016 MacBook Pro."

Link | Posted on Nov 4, 2016 at 20:56 UTC as 129th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Ian: By all means, let's replace a crappy SD slot (that sticks way out) with a bag full of overpriced accessories. That's way more convenient and compact. Not.

Thankfully we have other choices.

What kind of bag is filled by an SD card reader?

Link | Posted on Nov 4, 2016 at 14:39 UTC

I would have thought that after decades of second guessing Apple's moves and motives people would be prepared to give them some recognition for bold decisions that jolt industry standards foward. Peripheral connections have been shambolic for far too long. A laptop that has sufficient dedicated i/o for every kind of peripheral and connector would certainly not be totable. At long last we see real convergence. Sure, lots of folks have SD cards. But many potential users of Apple pro laptops have other card needs that never have had a dedicated slot. Memory manufacturers continue to proliferate different storage media, and camera makers enable them by choosing different types. Then there are all the disparate serial, display and networking types. At last with Thunderbot 3 / USBC-C there is a single standard that can be used to connect just about anything including power. No need to choose which slot or connector orientation. Wireless and TB3: a much simpler and more elegant future.

Link | Posted on Nov 4, 2016 at 14:21 UTC as 177th comment | 7 replies
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (871 comments in total)
In reply to:

wayne ker: Just to clear things up, it's USB-C connector but the underlying technology is Thunderbolt 3! That's 4x times faster than USB 3.1! It also offers bi-directional power up to 100w and can connect up to 6 devices!

My arguments did not go away. Please don't misrepresent me. You actually have no idea what I use in addition to a MacBook. For what I use it for, the MacBook is an excellent computer. For one thing, its screen is the best I have ever used for working with and showing photos. The new MBP will replace my previous MBP and work with my peripherals, and if its screen is anywhere near as good as the one on the Retina MB, it will be a spectacular computer for photographic use.

There are many people who are very excited about the new design, and I predict that these machines will sell well. But obviously not to you since you seem to need to justify having made a different choice, nor to the professional whiners. My argument has simply been about the advantages of having 4 TB3 ports that are versatile, powerful, backwards compatible and forward looking (the same argument made in Barney's article above).

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2016 at 19:33 UTC
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (871 comments in total)
In reply to:

wayne ker: Just to clear things up, it's USB-C connector but the underlying technology is Thunderbolt 3! That's 4x times faster than USB 3.1! It also offers bi-directional power up to 100w and can connect up to 6 devices!

I don't need any adaptors. For my 12" Macbook I already have USB-C external SSD drive (Samsung T3, a superb, tiny, fast drive), USB-C card reader, flash drive, and USB-C to Lightning cable to connect to my phone. They will all work on a new MBP, at the same time.

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2016 at 16:59 UTC
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (871 comments in total)
In reply to:

wayne ker: Just to clear things up, it's USB-C connector but the underlying technology is Thunderbolt 3! That's 4x times faster than USB 3.1! It also offers bi-directional power up to 100w and can connect up to 6 devices!

My point was: it's not better for everyone. Versatility is reduced with dedicated, single-type ports rather than universal TB 3 ports that can be used for any kind of connection. You are only considering what you need, and the peripherals you already have. What about the future? Can you connect two 5K monitors to your xps-15? And what might be "the most common" port now, may not be during the life of a high-end laptop. TB/USB-C will rule. Everything you have can still be connected plus whatever you might want in the future, and everything works at optimal speed (at least in the 15 inch MBP). There are other advantages too: for example, standardization on TB3/USB-C connectors means that fewer chargers need be carried for powered perpherals.

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2016 at 14:10 UTC
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (871 comments in total)
In reply to:

wayne ker: Just to clear things up, it's USB-C connector but the underlying technology is Thunderbolt 3! That's 4x times faster than USB 3.1! It also offers bi-directional power up to 100w and can connect up to 6 devices!

How would it be better? Each of the new ports can be connected with almost every kind of peripheral including power sources, various flavors of USB, Thunderbolt, FireWire, displays, networks, phones, tablets, cameras ... Think about it. Everyone has different needs. This solution allows for everyone to address their own backward and future compatibility. If all you need is USB then get an adaptor; compared to the cost of a new laptop, they are inexpensive.

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2016 at 12:45 UTC
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (871 comments in total)
In reply to:

Angrymagpie: Are they going to make an external keyboard with the touchbar? Without such a thing, I wouldn't be able to take advantage of the function when I have an external monitor, keyboard and trackpad attached to the laptop at a work station.

Yes, it seems logical that the Touchbar would be incorporated in future keyboards for desktop use. Maybe when Apple releases new iMacs?

Link | Posted on Oct 30, 2016 at 15:46 UTC
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (871 comments in total)
In reply to:

zeinali: My camera has SD card and normal USB cable. How can I upload my photos to new Macs?

Or, use your cable plus a USB-C to USB adaptor to connect your camera to the Mac. eBay has these adaptors for as little as $0.99.

Link | Posted on Oct 30, 2016 at 15:43 UTC
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (871 comments in total)
In reply to:

Biowizard: Oh Well Done Apple! (NOT)

Now you have a top-flight phone (iPhone 7) and a top-flight laptop (New MacBook Pro) that cannot connect to each other out of their respective boxes, until you pony up for some bodge-adapters.

And no ESC key, to get out of unwanted web pages and dialog boxes?

And ditching of the brilliant, saved my Mac more than once, MagSafe charging port?

Never has my current, 2012 model MacBook Pro felt MORE important. And that's before the 20% price hike you've just added across the board for us poor UK residents.

Brian

No "bodge-adaptor" is needed. To connect a Lightning iPhone to a Mac you have always needed a cable. Why is this any different for the new MBPs? Or the recent Macbooks? Okay, its a different cable (USB-C to Lightning) and its not included in your iPhone box. On the the other hand, you can use the new cable with the MBP charger to charge your phone, so when traveling you actually have to carry less.

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2016 at 20:27 UTC
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (871 comments in total)
In reply to:

EDWARD ARTISTE: whomever makes a usb c- card reader first- likely lexar- will be looking at $$$$

USB-C card readers have been available for some time (e.g. Kanex, Satechi).

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2016 at 00:32 UTC
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (871 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: I wonder if the batteries are still glued in, making it next to impossible to replace the touchpad?

This will change, but USB-C doesn't have real low profile external "drives", while normal USB has had such for some years now.

The Patriot USB-C flash drive projects about 20 mm when attached to USB-C, but has a normal USB connector as well. Definitely larger than the tiniest drives that fit in SD card slots, but much more versatile. The Samsung T3 I refered to is a much larger external SSD, but it is very small compared with most external drives and is available up to 2 TB; not really comparable to a flash drive, but much faster and more reliable.

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2016 at 21:15 UTC
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (871 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: I wonder if the batteries are still glued in, making it next to impossible to replace the touchpad?

This will change, but USB-C doesn't have real low profile external "drives", while normal USB has had such for some years now.

What do you mean by a "real low profile external drive"? With my Macbook, I use a 1TB Samsung T3 SSD and a Patriot 64 GB flash drive - these are USB-C and very compact.

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2016 at 20:43 UTC
In reply to:

Brian Slater: The consensus here seems to be that Canon is a company totally out of touch with the market. Some even suggest that Canon will be the next Kodak or Polaroid. Really? In fact, Canon remains a highly successful (profitable) business with clear goals and strategy. To answer the question as to whether they are serious about Mirrorless, just consider what their executives have communicated: they want to dominate. I would not bet against them.

The M3 will not be Canon's last word. They just had a massive release of new products: 4 DSLRS, the M3, and an advanced new lens, following up from other recent high-impact lens releases such as the 100-400 L. There will be other major product releases in 2015. Judging by the prices in Japan and camera features, the M3 is their Rebel-equivalent. I think they have constrained this release by applying higher prices in Europe and keeping the camera out of the North American market. This allows a full-on assault in the Asian market and a gradual ramp up of production lines. They have some space to release a new lens or two, and a carefully-timed new M release - a camera that fulfills the wish lists of enthusiasts (dual-pixel AF on the sensor, built-in VF etc.)

Link | Posted on Feb 12, 2015 at 19:06 UTC
In reply to:

Brian Slater: The consensus here seems to be that Canon is a company totally out of touch with the market. Some even suggest that Canon will be the next Kodak or Polaroid. Really? In fact, Canon remains a highly successful (profitable) business with clear goals and strategy. To answer the question as to whether they are serious about Mirrorless, just consider what their executives have communicated: they want to dominate. I would not bet against them.

Please read what I wrote. If you read through the hundreds of posts in this thread, there is no doubt that it is dominated by critics of Canon. I do NOT agree with most of the posters here. The point of my post was that in reality Canon knows what they are doing. I think they WILL dominate the Mirrorless market. And it's Brian, not Brain. You have no idea how old I am (though I did buy my first Canon in 1972).

Link | Posted on Feb 12, 2015 at 18:54 UTC

The consensus here seems to be that Canon is a company totally out of touch with the market. Some even suggest that Canon will be the next Kodak or Polaroid. Really? In fact, Canon remains a highly successful (profitable) business with clear goals and strategy. To answer the question as to whether they are serious about Mirrorless, just consider what their executives have communicated: they want to dominate. I would not bet against them.

Link | Posted on Feb 12, 2015 at 17:48 UTC as 44th comment | 8 replies
On article Updated: our Canon EOS M hands-on preview (161 comments in total)
In reply to:

facedodge: So many here make the mistake of associating the typical camera buyer with the typical DPR reader. These cameras will fly off the shelves of Best Buys and Camera stores everywhere.

Remember that guy/gal asking all those amateur questions at the camera store the last time you were there? The one that was hogging all the employee's attention when you were just trying to buy a new memory card? Yes, that is the person this camera is aimed for.

Also, remember when you tried to get your significant other interested in photography? Remember when you failed because they could never see themselves carrying around a brick to take photos with? Yes, this camera is aimed at that person too.

Remember when you wanted to take shots at your buddy's party, but you didn't want to be a dork lugging around an expensive DLSR? Yes, this camera is aimed at you too.

Writing off the "Canon" factor as ignorance or a desire to be cool misses the point. Canon is considered the most successful and respected camera maker. They didn't get there purely by ignorance, coolness, or just marketing. They had to back that up with products that people were happy to buy, use, and later replace or upgrade. Canon is likely to be there for them.

In addition, it is an EOS and part of that ecosystem. People upgrading from P&S and cell phones, and even some beginners often want to buy into a system they know is deep and growing, even if they never buy more than a kit zoom. And if you have some EF or EF-S lenses, Canon flashes etc., then they will work. No colored wires hanging out.

Finally, image quality. OK, Sony may have the edge, but the EOS-M gives you EOS 7D quality for $800. And Canon lenses - the broadest range, specialist optics if ever needed etc. The first two and other recent small EF lenses appear to be excellent, inexpensive.

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2012 at 18:59 UTC
In reply to:

Chaitanya S: I don't mind those cables as long as they don't come in the way of lens and sensor. this great news for many macro shooter as they can use their canon macro lenses to achieve higher magnification ratios with their canon macro lenses.

It's odd unless you want urgently to make a splash the day after the official release of a competitive product.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2012 at 18:38 UTC
In reply to:

justmeMN: As expected, it's an entry-level mirrorless camera, so it's no surprise that it doesn't have an EVF, and it's no surprise that it doesn't have enthusiast external controls.

In the future, Canon will release an enthusiast-level mirrorless camera.

When Samsung introduces a camera without EVF, NEX and m43 owners cry FAIL. When Panasonic introduces a camera without EVF, NEX, Samsung, Pentax, and Nikon V1 owners cry FAIL, and now there are plenty of Fuji, m43, NEX and various other camera owners crying FAIL among the thousands of EOS-M posts. And millions and millions of photos are framed on LCD screens every day with all kinds of cameras from cell phones to DSLRs with live view. It's not even the future. It's now.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2012 at 14:19 UTC
In reply to:

rocklobster: Sensor sizes aside you cannot get past the fact that this camera has no EVF or accesory port for an external EVF.
Even as an upgrade from a compact which Canon sees as a potential market the camera fails as it has no built-in flash and the kit lens kills the compact feel. Yes, you can say that there is a pancake lens that makes it somewhat 'pocketable' but the compact user market is not used to a zoom-less camera. In short, what does this camera offer that an NEX-5 does not have apart from compatibility (with adaptor) with Canon EF lenses?

Cheers

Does the Metabones adapter permit autofocus with EF lenses? Is it readily available? Does it adapt Canon EOS flashes to NEX cameras? The EOS-M offers a pathway into the Canon EOS ecosystem. People who want to travel in that direction are the target market.

Link | Posted on Jul 24, 2012 at 13:50 UTC
Total: 25, showing: 1 – 20
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