instamatic

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Nov 8, 2004

Comments

Total: 62, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

KW Phua: Why need to use 1/400s speed for the non-moving subject and used such hi ISO 1250. Not using the Hi DR at the low iso of this camera at all. The photographer do not have confident on holding the camera.

1/400s speed is actually a good speed to guarantee a sharp picture at this focal length, even without the best hand-holding technique, which you sometimes don't have time for, while quickly capturing expressions photo-journalistically.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2015 at 23:12 UTC

Exposure is an awesome product, one that I keep using.

Link | Posted on Dec 1, 2015 at 17:47 UTC as 3rd comment

You really don't need RAW most of the time - if speed of delivery is important - like stated here. Proper photography discipline and understanding of lighting will produce excellent JPGs out of camera probably like 95% of the time.

What struck me here, is that the size needs to be limited at 3500 px longest edge, which is about 8 megapixels. This goes contrary to some of the stuff one could read in the past, which stated, that stuff under 11 megapixels is not accepted, etc., etc. But then that probably applied to stock images.

All-in-all I think it's a wise decision, and allows the use of a smartphone alone to download and transfer images to the news agency.

Link | Posted on Nov 19, 2015 at 05:36 UTC as 42nd comment | 2 replies

My iPhone 6 really takes nice pictures. They are automatically well exposed and sharp like 99% of the time with pleasing color and contrast. This continues to hold in low light as well, though grain appears. Still, on-screen even this grain is a non-issue.

The camera is quick and responsive, and the built in HDR actually looks natural.

Additionally the photos are instantly available to share, or to be viewed on a flat screen TV via the inexpensive Apple TV.

What else can I care about for quick take and go snapshots that record life moments worth recording, seriously what else?

Link | Posted on Aug 28, 2015 at 20:38 UTC as 138th comment | 4 replies
On article Nikon D7200 Review (642 comments in total)

@ZJ24

Not the right comparison to TV and movies. All I'm saying is that at my recent vacation in the mountains of Tennessee, most people were using their smartphones, only a few had DSLRs (myself including). I could not spot any compact cameras, and maybe a couple of mirrorless cameras. Such a breakdown was not the case even 3-4 years ago.

You can share instantly from a smartphone, while you can't typically do that from a DSLR unless it's one of the latest models with WI-FI - and even with that you first transfer to smartphone. I used an Eye-Fi card in my camera, and copied JPGs mid-day to my smartphone and sent them to friends and family. My wife did the same, but she just used her smartphone to take photos. A camera connected to cellular data network gives you instant "bragging" ability, that anything else pretty much lacks.

Link | Posted on Jun 4, 2015 at 21:56 UTC as 87th comment | 1 reply
On article Nikon D7200 Review (642 comments in total)
In reply to:

(unknown member): Nice review but DLSR is a dying breed. Mirrorless is the way to go nowadays. Just look at the DP homepage, mirrorless sales are way up while DSLR sales are down!

Not even mirrorless, but a smartphone, seriously.

Link | Posted on Jun 4, 2015 at 21:45 UTC
On article Nikon 1 J5: What you need to know (505 comments in total)
In reply to:

instamatic: I generally agree with Richard. I also think, than unless we have a camera that is Android (or iOS) based, fully connected via a cellular network (yes cellular, not only WI-FI) I don't see this market going anywhere but into further erosion.

The smartphone has pretty much significantly subdued, or even killed this market, and smartphone photos look excellent nowadays (I only have iPhone experience). The typical image-maker these days does not care about interchangeable lenses, and rarely knows (or cares for that matter) what depth-of-field, or lens wide-angle distortion is, so it does not matter to them, as long as they are happy with what their smartphone gives them.

I understand what you're saying, though iPhone does have a tactile control: the side Volume +/- buttons function as a shutter release for the camera. Exposure-wise iPhone pretty much nails it every time for snapshots, so I don't see a need for more controls. However for something like you mention: 20fps with autofocus, is a different need than mine, and the J series makes sense. How often do you use the feature?

I have a Nikon J1 originally bought to complement my DSLRs. But I have to admit, the primary reasons that turn me away from the J1 are 1) lack of AE-Lock Hold feature, 2) even with face detection, the AF does not get eyes perfectly sharp in portraits. I expect a true, accurate and brisk point-and-snap performance, with subjectively good auto-exposure, from a camera with face detection.

I'm not mentioning the lack of connectivity because it is somewhat solved on newer models.

Maybe the J5 addresses my concerns though?

Link | Posted on Apr 2, 2015 at 19:08 UTC
On article Nikon 1 J5: What you need to know (505 comments in total)

I generally agree with Richard. I also think, than unless we have a camera that is Android (or iOS) based, fully connected via a cellular network (yes cellular, not only WI-FI) I don't see this market going anywhere but into further erosion.

The smartphone has pretty much significantly subdued, or even killed this market, and smartphone photos look excellent nowadays (I only have iPhone experience). The typical image-maker these days does not care about interchangeable lenses, and rarely knows (or cares for that matter) what depth-of-field, or lens wide-angle distortion is, so it does not matter to them, as long as they are happy with what their smartphone gives them.

Link | Posted on Apr 2, 2015 at 15:38 UTC as 62nd comment | 5 replies
On article Apple reveals Photos beta for developers (125 comments in total)
In reply to:

maljo@inreach.com: I also loved Aperture, but am learning to like Lightroom. It's raw conversion is quite good. I'm manually converting 800,000 images from A to LR and enjoying the process of revisiting older images.

I license CaptureOne and can attest that it produces an outstanding image quality and detail. I prefer the output to that from Lightroom 5 and Aperture. The drawback is a slightly slower performance and a user interface that is less intuitive than that of Lightroom or Aperture requiring more clicks to get things done. To balance, however, CaptureOne can be operated very well with a keyboard, and new keystrokes can be easily defined for common tasks that are applicable to my workflow. I also license PhotoNinja which I think has better image quality still and one-of-a-kind noise reduction over CaptureOne, but it's slow on my aging computer. In my opinion though Aperture and Lightroom have the most efficient user interfaces. Out of all those tools, I currently opt to do RAW conversions using CaptureOne, as I think it provides the best quality with optimal, though not best, efficiency.

Link | Posted on Feb 8, 2015 at 21:31 UTC
On article Apple reveals Photos beta for developers (125 comments in total)
In reply to:

MikeFairbanks: Oh, brother! Here we go again.

I've never liked Apple's iOS versions of photo management. They make you have certain folders (favorites is one) and your camera roll (or whatever it's called right now) stays at the top and all photos have to remain in that folder.

Just let me organize my folders and photos how I wish, please.

I'm still an Apple user (my phone) and am going to purchase an iPad soon (but nothing with a mere 1 gb of RAM), but all this changing of the native photo app is annoying.

Just ask your customers what they want.

And while you're at it, please make Safari on iOS a better browser. It has very few custom features.

A lot of the time Apple wants you to do things one way, and of course their way.

It can be argued that from user interface usability standpoint this can be beneficial, but in the case of photos in iOS, this seems to get in the way and creates more problems than it solves unfortunately, especially when you're using other apps that edit photos in the Photostream.

Link | Posted on Feb 8, 2015 at 21:16 UTC
On article Apple reveals Photos beta for developers (125 comments in total)

That's just sad. Nobody to my knowledge currently has the very useful Auto Curve function of Aperture. More specifically nobody has one that works as 'smartly' and adaptively as the one in Aperture. No Lightroom, no Capture One, no PhotoNinja.

But then again the bulk of Apple's profit is not from Aperture, nor even from selling Macs for that matter.

In this day and age we are mostly at the mercy of Apple, Adobe, and other companies when it comes to efficient workflow or high quality processed output done efficiently. There is much room still to streamline and improve workflow, and some of it seems like low hanging fruit, but alas that innovation is not being made even when new versions of software are released. This is probably because lucrative profit is already being made from what's currently offered and it may seem like it's not viable to innovate beyond recycling the old tried and true formula from several years back and calling it new versions.

Link | Posted on Feb 8, 2015 at 21:14 UTC as 19th comment | 2 replies
On article Apple to cease development of Aperture (425 comments in total)

Aperture's very powerful auto curves feature, as well as the mid-tone contrast slider of the shadows and highlights brick is what I'll be missing. These two things are essential to my workflow. After using Aperture for about 2 years now, I distinctly prefer it to LR. It works differently and I needed some time to adjust, but after I did, I observed how smart it's auto features are, and the adjustments felt more subtle and precise.

I hope Apple delivers a good replacement. I would be disappointed with an application that's only useful for minor edits of photos taken with an "iDevice".

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2014 at 01:49 UTC as 21st comment

Nikon sales must really be hurting so they launched this campaign. Good, but too little and too late.

I hope Nikon is not oblivious to the notion that DSLRs are slowly progressing on a way to extinction. In my opinion it's not only about rebuilding user confidence in the brand, but also about deciding where to take the company next.

Hint: The Nikon 1 system is great in hands-on practice, but poorly marketed, and unappealing to the Western consumer. Why? The Western consumer wants large numbers, i.e. large sensors, large ISO values, large etc., and at the same time he wants full manual control. Actually none of those things are needed in practice because Nikon 1 is so surprisingly smart in taking photos in auto mode, but the consumer won't know this until they use the camera, and to use it they need to buy it - because now cameras are mostly bought online not in a brick and mortar store when they can be tried first. Nikon 1 is expensive - the consumer concludes to skip it.

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2014 at 15:37 UTC as 42nd comment | 2 replies
On article Samsung announces NX3000 mirrorless camera (193 comments in total)
In reply to:

instamatic: This is impressive. A small, APS-C camera with broad wireless transfer options. Take pictures and selfies, and post almost instantly to social network sites and more importantly: to cloud galleries. This time the image quality will beat that of smartphones too. Smartphones killed the compact cameras, and actually paper prints as well for the most part. Samsung appears to embrace this inevitable trend very well - much better than the competition in my opinion.

Looking at the lens selection, it appears that all the prime lenses are there, including ultra wides (sorely missing today from the major camera brands).

A revolutionary, and much needed, mold-breaking product, and at a decent price too.

@Impulses:

All I'm saying is that the industry has moved, it's just that very few people noticed that. Indeed we currently have many WI-FI enabled cameras but they cost a lot of money, if you want APS-C sensors or better, with all the connectivity, in a small form factor at this price, where do you go?. I don't currently own any Samsung cameras or phones, or tablets. I'm basing my observations on what I see, and the potential of this particular product.

Regarding the transition of the industry. My eye opening moment was when I moved some of my photos to Apple's iCloud photo stream. I can view them on my iPhone, my iPad, and on my flat screen TV via Apple TV, with very little effort. They will always be there unless iCloud goes away. To me that signalizes the end of most paper prints, except for the few that are enlarged and hanged on walls.

Link | Posted on May 8, 2014 at 19:21 UTC
On article Samsung announces NX3000 mirrorless camera (193 comments in total)

This is impressive. A small, APS-C camera with broad wireless transfer options. Take pictures and selfies, and post almost instantly to social network sites and more importantly: to cloud galleries. This time the image quality will beat that of smartphones too. Smartphones killed the compact cameras, and actually paper prints as well for the most part. Samsung appears to embrace this inevitable trend very well - much better than the competition in my opinion.

Looking at the lens selection, it appears that all the prime lenses are there, including ultra wides (sorely missing today from the major camera brands).

A revolutionary, and much needed, mold-breaking product, and at a decent price too.

Link | Posted on May 8, 2014 at 16:48 UTC as 34th comment | 6 replies
On article Alien Skin Software announces Exposure 6 plugin (11 comments in total)

Having used Exposure 3 through 5 now as well as other plugins, I am compelled to say that Exposure is one of the best plugins out there. It actually can run standalone as well. It is very fast compared to some other similar software packages that do similar things. I'm not comparing it to actual film colors as there are variation in scanning methods, etc. But overall it produces excellent results and gives images a certain taste - speeding up workflow as it's very good with batch processing. Additionally it's sharpening algorithm is very very good. I'm glad that bokeh will now be included, as I have that as well and use it more often than not.

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2014 at 15:44 UTC as 3rd comment
In reply to:

Danlo: I sooo wish Nikon would read these comments, bur looking at their linup, you know they never do. Like where is the FF-sensor in a d3300 body? I wouldnt even care about other companies mirrorless-offerings it they just released that.

I would be interested in a full-frame sensor in a Nikon N65 style body. Just the basics, no gimmicks. It would not have to even have a pentaprism, a pentamirror would do. They could resurrect the CAM900 AF module for it, or perhaps the CAM1300 from the F100. Give it a nice flash sync of 1/250 sec, plus FP and it's a great camera. I don't care for video personally for this kind of body, but to be "competitive" I guess the camera would have to have it.

Also it may be difficult to fit a 3 inch screen on such a small body, but I wouldn't care. The screen could be smaller for my needs, however I could appreciate live histogram in live view, plus exposure compensation preview in live view.

Link | Posted on Apr 11, 2014 at 14:35 UTC
Total: 62, showing: 1 – 20
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