Enders Shadow

Enders Shadow

Lives in United States AZ, United States
Works as a Retired engineer
Joined on Jun 12, 2015

Comments

Total: 11, showing: 1 – 11
In reply to:

toughluck: Meanwhile, A99ii doesn't get firmware upgrades that other alpha cameras got, and now is trickling down to RX line.

Image processing is largely handled by hardware based arrays. The amount of image data handled per sec isn't by itself a good metric of processing power. And, that difference between the A99ii and A9 is pretty small.

Pattern recognition and image tracking are far more processing intensive tasks. The A9's AF capabilities totally smokes the A99ii. AF processing enhancements introduced by the A9 were shared with the RX10 IV. But the A9 continued to evolve with numerous firmware updates. This will be the first update for the RX10IV.

Link | Posted on Oct 29, 2019 at 14:05 UTC
In reply to:

toughluck: Meanwhile, A99ii doesn't get firmware upgrades that other alpha cameras got, and now is trickling down to RX line.

Not so. The A99ii introduced their new custom front-end LSI AF chip. The A9 picked up a new generation of their processor. From the A9's press release:

"This unique sensor is paired with a brand new, upgraded BIONZ X processing engine and front end LSI that maximizes overall performance"

Cameras using this processor are capable of handling the AF update, including the RX10 IV. However, it's a new twist for Sony to add new features to a RX series camera via a firmware update.

Link | Posted on Oct 29, 2019 at 12:03 UTC
In reply to:

toughluck: Meanwhile, A99ii doesn't get firmware upgrades that other alpha cameras got, and now is trickling down to RX line.

The update requires the processor introduced with the A9. Cameras in production before that apparently don't have sufficient horsepower.

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2019 at 23:29 UTC
In reply to:

Pooya Rastin: How is it possible that the speed of these cards are 3 times the speed of my Samsung 960 pro SSDs ?!

@BJL The sustained sequential write speed of the Delkin CFX card is reported to be in the range of 900-975MB/s. For a 42MP camera producing 82MB RAW files, that potentially could translate into something around 10fps with little to no buffer delay. The typical APS-C camera using RAW could shoot at 30fps and not max out the card. The PCIe x2 interface combined with the NVMe protocol currently seems more than adequate for us stills shooters.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2018 at 04:35 UTC
In reply to:

Pooya Rastin: How is it possible that the speed of these cards are 3 times the speed of my Samsung 960 pro SSDs ?!

CFexpress uses NVMe but as mentioned, is limited by 2 lanes of PCIe 3.0.

Link | Posted on Apr 9, 2018 at 19:36 UTC
On article Olympus TG-5 gallery updated (74 comments in total)
In reply to:

Ben Herrmann: On the surface, these images look great - with a nice color tonality and clarity typically missing from cameras of this genre. But regardless of MP count, you can't escape the limitations of these small sensors.

Enlarge each image to 100% and you'll see the typical compression artifacts, noise, or what have you that has plagued most of these much smaller sensors, regardless of brand. But Olympus did a great job on this one. I can definitely see bringing this camera along when a heavy duty pocket camera will do.

And wallaaaaa...it has RAW capabilities which will help quite a bit in order to achieve the best IQ possible for the genre.

You should take a look at the White Balance menu on your 860. Underwater is one of the options.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2017 at 19:25 UTC
On article Have Your Say: Best Gear of 2016 (99 comments in total)

So the G85 gets 7.2% of the vote and the a6300 6.4%. Yet the Sony is rated as the best mid-range ILC. Some sort of new math?

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2017 at 18:57 UTC as 4th comment
In reply to:

futile32: "Dual UHS-II SD slots"

Nice!

I can live with one SD slot being UHS-1 as long as it uses SDR104 bus speed. The majority of cameras are limited to SDR50.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 18:56 UTC
In reply to:

(unknown member): "The ISO LOW setting will be equivalent to ISO 64, providing greater flexibility to shoot at wider apertures even in brightly-lit situations, making it possible to achieve beautiful shallow depths-of-field."

So base ISO is now 100?
As ISO-LOW was on E-M1 truly ISO 160 and software to ISO 100. So now having one extra ISO at low and ISO 5000 increased to ISO 6400 makes it 1 stop.

Their current detailed spec don't indicate a base ISO, but I agree with your logic.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2016 at 18:46 UTC
In reply to:

tinternaut: Time we had a 1" format Tough.

The new (and delayed) Nikon DL line.

Link | Posted on May 30, 2016 at 17:24 UTC
On article Gone fishing: Olympus TG-4 gallery updated (18 comments in total)
In reply to:

papa natas: Seems like sales are not as they were expected, uh?
That's what comes to mind when a new camera goes through a "expanded review" But why aren't the Olympus's thinking bubbles, UPGRADING instead of reselling a stalled cup of coffee?
I'm a happy owner of the Olympus TG-2. Yes: HAPPY. This little devil delivers, it brings the bacon home. The most inventive little camera in its class. Now we are up to the TG-4.
-Same sensor size, but this time with RAW option..WOO HAA!! who needs it with this sensor size? Why not upgrade it to 1/1.7", uh? That's a change.
-Filters, nothing new to write home about.
-But wait..! Look at the screen pixel count: TG-2: 610 000 vs TG-4: 460 000.
You went cheapo, Olympus.. Except for the pricing. The TG-2 price tag, new, was 50$ than the TG-4.
We really miss you Mr. Maitani.

The change in display addressed daylight viability complaints of the TG-2. I've had the TG-2 & TG-3 side by side in bright sunlight. The new display, also used in the TG-4, is a noticeable improvement.

Get used to small incremental updates. The TG series is probably one of the few compact lines Oly will keep alive.

Link | Posted on Sep 19, 2015 at 19:20 UTC
Total: 11, showing: 1 – 11