TFD

Lives in Canada Canada
Joined on Jul 27, 2009

Comments

Total: 58, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Google will no longer develop Nik Collection (389 comments in total)

I have used the Nik plugins for years, I find the control point function extremely useful in doing selective area editing; brightness, contrast, saturation, etc. I do not know of any other plugins that have this functionality,

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2017 at 08:45 UTC as 1st comment
On article Alpha-better: Sony a9 versus a7R II (503 comments in total)

The A9 body is what the A7 always should have been, more controls, bigger battery. The A7 evolved out of the NEX which probably explains why they valued size over usability.

The A7 series one performance miss is their speed, while not everyone needs the A9 speed the A7 series are slow my A77 is twice as fast as any A7.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2017 at 09:06 UTC as 30th comment
On article The Leica Summaron 28mm F5.6 is old-fashioned fun (189 comments in total)

it would be a good choice at $50 on ebay.

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2017 at 08:58 UTC as 11th comment
On article Oberwerth launches Donau line of leather lens pouches (56 comments in total)

Nylon has replaced leather for many applications and I think here as well, While it may not smell or feel as nice nylon works better for this application, stronger, more durable, etc. and cheaper.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 14:07 UTC as 5th comment

4/3 was born when DLSR's had 6M APS-C sensors and the pixel wars had not started and at a time when sensors were more costly and difficult to make. 4/3 was perhaps a reasonable size to squeeze 5-6M pixels into.
With the advent of APS-C and FF sensors in the 24-50M range the 4/3 is now penalized in its ability to complete (this applies to the M4/3 as well). What make the current M4/3 cameras doubly disadvantaged is they are not cheaper than their APC-C competition either from a camera or system perspective.

The one advantage 4/3 had was to offer smaller lenses and larger zoom ranges. Given that you can find multiple APS-C zoom lenses in the 18-250 and 16-300 range it should have been possible to make a 4/3 lens in the 12- >250mm (eq. 24-500++) range. As a travel camera a 4/3 camera with a long range zoom lens could have been an appealing product, sadly no one ever built one...

Link | Posted on Mar 12, 2017 at 09:53 UTC as 32nd comment | 3 replies

Time to market and having a competitive offering is a make or break. The 24-500 was designed to out reach the Panasonic FZ1000 however once Sony released their 600mm RX10 that market position was lost. As for the other two Nikons they needed to be better and/or cheaper than Sony to enter a market 3 years late.

It goes without saying that in the non-DSLR space that smartphones are seriously eating into the market causing the shrinkage.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2017 at 11:10 UTC as 83rd comment
On article Throwback Thursday: Minolta's prosumer DiMAGE 7 (207 comments in total)

I still have my A2 tucked way, after having sold my A1 . In some respects it was a very sophisticated camera looking externally like the 7 series. with a 8 M sensor and high resolution EVF. The versatility of the controls was beyond most of today's cameras. Its shot to shot times were a problem I think the electronics had not been scaled up to handle the 3M extra pixels. Image quality was ok, never quite got it perfect not withstanding all of the available settings.

Link | Posted on Feb 9, 2017 at 14:25 UTC as 99th comment | 1 reply

We this is one useless idea. I am not sure why anyone would want to pay $400 for a housing to take bad pictures underwater. Might just buy an underwater point a shoot good to 50 feet and save $150. At 100 Meters got to think there would be serious lack of light making this concept pointless.

Link | Posted on Jan 28, 2017 at 16:54 UTC as 3rd comment

While I have several pieces of software that can recreate film looks I have not used them. All films had some shortfalls that I created their looks but recreating that look in fau-digital does not excite me.

Slide film is not for the inexperienced, exposure latitude is about zero and with only 36 images to the role you need to be frugal about what you shoot. If it is ASA 100 better get out your fast lens.

Likely as not most people shooting film will sooner or latter scan them into a digital format. The Film eco-system (Film, Film Cameras, Printing chemistry, paper, etc) is what would be required. Cibachrome printing was the best silver printing technology but it too has been discontinued. So not sure it makes sense to shoot in film only to scan it into digital to use it.

Link | Posted on Jan 5, 2017 at 21:46 UTC as 113th comment
On article Google Pixel XL camera review (200 comments in total)

I am confused, I was labouring under the assumption that all smart phones had microscopic sensors. This article reference a 1/2.3 sensor (6.17 x 4.55 mm) making it the same size as a point and shoot camera.

If this is true then there would appear to be some optical magic to get such a small lens to sensor distance and small lens diameters. If they are same size sensor I would like to see a direct comparison between cell phones and point and shoot camera images.

And just as a point of curiosity what is the mechanical mechanism that allows movement between the sensor and lens to set focus.

Link | Posted on Dec 22, 2016 at 10:32 UTC as 34th comment | 3 replies
On article New 20mm F2 4.5x macro lens released by Mitakon (122 comments in total)

what would have been more useful would be a 100mm lens with the same mag. ratio. longer macro lens have a flatter field and a larger subject to camera distance allowing for such niceties like lighting.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2016 at 10:07 UTC as 7th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

TFD: While picking up a $100 used MF Russian lens is interesting as a cheap and cheerful toy. The idea of modern and expensive manual focus lenses is just dumb. Regardless if it is an $800 Tokina or a $3000 Zeiss. Tokina knows how to make autofocus lenses selling a MF lens is just a marketing gimmick.

Maybe the next step will be uncoated lens, might as well just go further back in time.

The point here is that auto-focus lens are also manual focus. It would be smarter for lens manufacturers to design autofocus lens with well designed manual focus function and have the best of both worlds. Alternatively don't pay a premium price to get less functionality.

The comments about hyper-focal setting are valid and a better than nothing approach and for wide angle lens only, at 135mm it would be useless and it would be equally useless for zoom lens, or more correctly variable focal length lens.

The one group has not got on the manual focus bandwagon the DSLR manufacturers (Canon and Nikon) else we would see thier cameras being shipped with manual focusing aids - Remember Split screen and Microprism screens.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2016 at 10:27 UTC

While picking up a $100 used MF Russian lens is interesting as a cheap and cheerful toy. The idea of modern and expensive manual focus lenses is just dumb. Regardless if it is an $800 Tokina or a $3000 Zeiss. Tokina knows how to make autofocus lenses selling a MF lens is just a marketing gimmick.

Maybe the next step will be uncoated lens, might as well just go further back in time.

Link | Posted on Dec 13, 2016 at 11:15 UTC as 3rd comment | 22 replies

What is old become new, there is a fascination with manual focus lenses and manually focusing a 10mm F5.6 lens might be a snap. manually focusing a 50mm F0.95 with an electronic viewfinder might be harder and don't forget the manual exposure, take a big memory card and expect 1 in 4 to be in focus and properly exposed.

I agree with the comments on price a cheap $300 lens great. $3000 for a lens possibly made in German or China. I think I will keep my Sony/Zeiss 85mm F1.4.

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2016 at 10:31 UTC as 17th comment | 4 replies
On article Mobile Speed: Portable SSDs for photographers (205 comments in total)
In reply to:

TFD: In the days when flash was insanely expensive and 512M was a big flash card I would copy from flash cards to a laptop or an external drive, erase the flash cards to reuse them the next day.

Now that flash is dirt cheap I have ~500G of various 32/64G flash cards, enough for any trip. Do not see the point of transferring multiple flash cards into a single SSD device. both have the same reliability and better to have photos spread across 20 flash cards than a single SSD. The last thing I really want to do when travelling is coping from one flash storage device to another.

Well in my case I am happy with temporary storage on memory cards after acquiring more SD cards during sales than I could possibly ever fill. I eventually do just a single step of coping to my home computer which is mirrored to another drive using Second Copy.

In any case they are just photos and not the collected cultural history of the Western world or the Genomics database for the world's seed diversity....

Link | Posted on Dec 4, 2016 at 15:23 UTC
On article Mobile Speed: Portable SSDs for photographers (205 comments in total)

In the days when flash was insanely expensive and 512M was a big flash card I would copy from flash cards to a laptop or an external drive, erase the flash cards to reuse them the next day.

Now that flash is dirt cheap I have ~500G of various 32/64G flash cards, enough for any trip. Do not see the point of transferring multiple flash cards into a single SSD device. both have the same reliability and better to have photos spread across 20 flash cards than a single SSD. The last thing I really want to do when travelling is coping from one flash storage device to another.

Link | Posted on Dec 2, 2016 at 21:23 UTC as 26th comment | 3 replies
On article The whole nine yards: Canon 35mm F1.4L II USM review (338 comments in total)

somehow we have gotten the cart in front of the horse. Remember the film world shooting Kodachrome ASA 25 or maybe ASA 64, or you could go out on a limb and shoot Ektachrome 400 with a less than ideal output, and of course there was no optical stabilization. Fast lenses were important.

Fast forward to the digital domain, ISO 100-1000-10,000 -100,000 and optical stabilization. Fast forward again to the on-line domain, Facebook, Twitter, Smartphones, image and screen sizes - <1M pixels.

So here we are now 50M pixels, F1.4, 90% of images on-line. The Dinosaur is going extinct it just cannot see the comet heading its way.

Of course purely expensive and cool looking technology to hang around ones neck will always be desired and never goes out of style, think Cartier, Bulgari, Piaget.

Personally I am going to find a Pentacon lens made in the country previously known as the DDR, because nothing looks or feels better then precision machined metal...

Link | Posted on Dec 2, 2016 at 11:26 UTC as 38th comment | 4 replies

Remember when Flash was expensive and camera manuals included a table of how many photos of each size and quality you could store in 16M card.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2016 at 09:01 UTC as 16th comment

Really is there no current news. I have a box full of old camera available for review.

If you are going to review old cameras lets dig up the worst of the bunch - there would be a lot to chose from and lets remind ourselves how much we paid in 1990 dollars for them,

Link | Posted on Oct 20, 2016 at 16:52 UTC as 37th comment | 8 replies

I keep wanting to like Adobe products but their user interface is ugly & complicated and feels like it was lifted from Adobe Illustrator of the 90's which was truly offal.

I have tried a few version of Elements, each with some minor features that were for me not especially valuable, each retaining the ugly UI.

The only value of Elements is it has greater plug-in support than Corel Paintshop pro does.

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2016 at 09:52 UTC as 4th comment
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