M0RJC

Joined on May 2, 2015

Comments

Total: 48, showing: 1 – 20
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On a photo in the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III Sample Gallery sample gallery (1 comment in total)

It seems to under-expose in bright scenes. I guess the common problem with metering, but solved with easy compensation.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2020 at 10:43 UTC as 1st comment
On a photo in the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III Sample Gallery sample gallery (5 comments in total)

Nice capture

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2020 at 10:42 UTC as 3rd comment
On a photo in the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III Sample Gallery sample gallery (5 comments in total)
In reply to:

Michael: Not bad for ISO2000 on microlooser sensor)

I'm still torn - second hand Mk2 or new Mk3? The Mk2 in my local shop is about £700, looks a little worn but should be good enough. My Mk1 (also second hand) is finally starting to fail.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2020 at 10:40 UTC
On a photo in the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III Sample Gallery sample gallery (5 comments in total)
In reply to:

Michael: Not bad for ISO2000 on microlooser sensor)

I guess I've frequented things like Sony newsgroups too much :-)

My question is always what aperture do you need to shoot at. We see a few people in these places who don't understand that question.

Link | Posted on Feb 13, 2020 at 10:39 UTC
On a photo in the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark III Sample Gallery sample gallery (5 comments in total)
In reply to:

Michael: Not bad for ISO2000 on microlooser sensor)

I assume you have full frame.
Does f/2.2 give you enough depth of field for this shot? The photographer has stopped down, so maybe you would too. Only you stop down to f/4.5 for the same shot. 1/80s is slow enough. Can your subject sit still for 1/20s, or will you increase ISO to 8000 to maintain shutter speed?

How's your sensor noise at ISO 8000?

What pixel pitch do you have with your higher megapixel count? Do you need all those megapixels? How big do you print? How far away do you stand when you view them?

Link | Posted on Feb 12, 2020 at 14:52 UTC

"Based on your Instagram following"

Mine is set to private, has about 5 photos in it, and hasn't been used for some time. So I guess that will be 0.

Link | Posted on Apr 27, 2018 at 15:34 UTC as 19th comment
On article Throwback Thursday: Our first cameras (401 comments in total)

My first was my Mum's Olympus Trip 35, a 35mm film camera. It worked well, although metering was a bit basic. I moved on from that to a Nikon F601.

- Richard

Link | Posted on Mar 31, 2017 at 21:41 UTC as 24th comment

Flash exposure lock like on the Nikon D90. (Though I admit flash auto exposure has been fine on my EM5)

Link | Posted on Mar 18, 2017 at 20:48 UTC as 13th comment

I'm impressed with mine. Not as good as an SLR but really very very usable for many photos. No need to take the SLR for things like family outings. It has worked quite well in low light, and also surprisingly well for a phone in strong backlight. I wonder if it's combining frames at different exposures to do it?

It would be nice to see some of this technology in future SLRs, especially the dual pixel focusing. It is amazing what you can get now from a tiny sensor.

Link | Posted on May 25, 2016 at 11:01 UTC as 3rd comment
In reply to:

Catalin Stavaru: I am surprised that people do not realize why the 4:3 aspect ratio was chosen.

It is because in the same lens circle you can fit a larger area rectangle with 4:3 ratio than a rectangle with 3:2 or (even worse) 16:9 ratio.

For a circle of radius R, the area of a rectangle with 4:3 ratio is 1.92 * R^2. The area of a rectangle with 3:2 ratio is 1.84 * R^2. The area of a rectangle with 16:9 ratio is 1.709 * R^2. The area of a square is 2 * R^2, the maximum attainable.

So a rectangle with 4:3 ratio has 5% larger area than one with 3:2 ratio and 12% larger area than a rectangle with 16:9 ratio for the same lens circle.

So the 4:3 ratio maximizes the area occupied by the sensor in the lens circle.

Of course, Apple probably realized this first, then Samsung followed, but who cares :)

I thought 4:3 was historic - from old TV standards. Though the old TV standards may have been formed for similar reasons?

Link | Posted on May 25, 2016 at 10:57 UTC
On article Countdown to PIX 2015: Aaron Huey and his son Hawkeye (19 comments in total)
In reply to:

Under The Sun: I follow them on Instagram. Love their adorable photos! :)

Until recently I thought that of Instagram, as all I ever saw of it was people on Facebook taking snapshots with their mobile phones and heavily processing them.

Link | Posted on Sep 28, 2015 at 11:24 UTC
On article Countdown to PIX 2015: Aaron Huey and his son Hawkeye (19 comments in total)
In reply to:

CopCarSS: The kid has a better eye than most of the pixel peepers on DPR.

My little one can miss at times - maybe takes some practice, but also size and weight of the camera may be a concern. It's hard to stop a heavy camera drooping and chopping off the head if you're small.

One of the concerns is getting a camera that you'd allow a 5 year old to play with. The Nikon Robust Kids Camera got broken somehow, so what? Something very cheap I suppose?

Link | Posted on Sep 28, 2015 at 11:07 UTC
On article Heavy lifting: Leica S (Type 007) sample gallery (189 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jefftan: I know I will get attack but I still have to said this
got a MFT camera and put on a good lens like Leica 15mm F1.7 at base ISO are you not getting the same or even better IQ?

High ISO is another story

£12,800 + another £4,000 for the lens is a fair amount extra above the cost of the Olympus :-)

Thanks for the tip. I'll have a look.

....

Wow! That £16,800 gets you an awful lot of detail. I don't think I've been able to zoom into the patterns in the iris on a portrait in which the subject is not much larger in the frame. Finding the first shot of one of my kids I can get hold of, the sensor noise at ISO 200 is overriding detail at that magnification level.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2015 at 17:16 UTC
On article Get more accurate color with camera calibration (245 comments in total)
In reply to:

Class A: In my experience, the automatic generation of a camera profile from a shot of a Colorchecker does not work optimally.

Perhaps Adobe have optimised this process for the CFA characteristics of Canon cameras, but when using this approach with my Pentax, I got different colours but not all of them were correct.

For anyone needing 100% accurate colours, it would be worth their effort to take a picture of a Colorchecker in every condition and then tweak the image later (through a camera profile or in post) so that the colours are reproduced faithfully.

For everyone else, I'd say it is much more fruitful to tweak the colours in post to your liking and where you start from isn't terribly important.

I thought it had to be done for every situation, so have only used it twice. (I got DataColor's as a freebie with their monitor calibrator). Maybe I should try again, but I thought it was at least per light source.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2015 at 11:43 UTC
On article Heavy lifting: Leica S (Type 007) sample gallery (189 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jefftan: I know I will get attack but I still have to said this
got a MFT camera and put on a good lens like Leica 15mm F1.7 at base ISO are you not getting the same or even better IQ?

High ISO is another story

The tones seem a lot softer in the image above than I find in processing my images from MFT. I don't know how much of that is the processing and original lighting conditions, and how much is down to the larger sensor. Medium Format takes the "You'd be better on full frame" argument a lot further, and was always a lot nicer in the world of film where I last encountered (and had a hope of affording) it.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2015 at 11:34 UTC
On article Polaroid Snap instant digital camera prints 2x3" photos (103 comments in total)
In reply to:

RichRMA: A smart product. Offers a quick, likely inexpensive (unless you are so strapped for cash $0.50-$1.00 each will brake you, in which case stick to your phone) and fulfills a need not met by phones or other digitals. This will also be good to the people who the takers want to show images. They won't be taking hundreds so you won't be subjected to them frantically searching their phone for 20 minutes looking through hundreds of shots to find the one they want to show you.

I took my son climbing on Friday and wanted photos for him to show friends, so for the first time in some time asked the camera to convert RAW to JPEG and took them into a high street shop to print.

Not as nice as I can get in Lightroom, as conditions indoors were not good. What lighting there was incredibly uneven. But the prints were very passable and did the job. We went to one of the better shops so had to get a drink and sandwich while we waited, but we could have gone to a local chemist for instant prints.

Maybe not as instant as this product, but a way of getting prints to share in a hurry if you're in town and the shops are open.

Link | Posted on Sep 5, 2015 at 20:55 UTC
On article MIT proposes new approach to HDR with 'Modulo' camera (115 comments in total)
In reply to:

ThePhilips: The "modulo" idea is so obvious, that I think that most makers have already thought about it but put it in the back due to some technical complication.

Otherwise, I prefer the other idea, where pixel's charge data are being read continuously. IOW, sensor sends the data continuously, and the "shutter speed" is just how long the firmware keeps accumulating the data before saying "enough". That removes the overflow completely. And also allows to selectively read more/less from shadows/highlights.

Would an op-amp or schmitt trigger type circuit do it? You'd just need a stupidly high impedance to not cause it to interfere with the result?

This innovation is per-pixel, which would mean a hardware not a firmware solution. (In reply to posts below about firmware).

Link | Posted on Aug 20, 2015 at 16:52 UTC
On article MIT proposes new approach to HDR with 'Modulo' camera (115 comments in total)
In reply to:

ThePhilips: The "modulo" idea is so obvious, that I think that most makers have already thought about it but put it in the back due to some technical complication.

Otherwise, I prefer the other idea, where pixel's charge data are being read continuously. IOW, sensor sends the data continuously, and the "shutter speed" is just how long the firmware keeps accumulating the data before saying "enough". That removes the overflow completely. And also allows to selectively read more/less from shadows/highlights.

My guess would be that it's unable to collect light while it's resetting. You could perhaps try to guess the result. "I collected 10,000 units of light, but I spent 10% of my time not collecting, so 10,000/0.9 units of light hit the pixel". I could imagine it gets messy if the shutter ends during a reset, which is more and more likely if the reset time is long.

Link | Posted on Aug 20, 2015 at 13:17 UTC
On article MIT proposes new approach to HDR with 'Modulo' camera (115 comments in total)

"presuming you can actually give the camera the extra light."

given I had to stop down to f11 in daytime if I want to fire fill in flash, there's plenty of space in those conditions to give the sensor more light.

Link | Posted on Aug 20, 2015 at 13:08 UTC as 37th comment
On article Light Field Cameras - Focusing on the Future (142 comments in total)

"'With a light field sensor, we can re-sort the light rays from where they went to where they should have gone' using only software"

That combined with the possibility of the 500MPixel raw sensor resolution could be interesting in the future. Micro-4/3 already uses software to correct distortion quite well, but quality lenses are still quite large. Could this technology in a m43 size camera body and sensor give a very good compromise? Smaller fast lenses giving the final quality of the currently bulkier top end lenses for the system?

Link | Posted on Aug 17, 2015 at 10:35 UTC as 3rd comment
Total: 48, showing: 1 – 20
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