PowerG9atBlackForest

PowerG9atBlackForest

Lives in Germany Germany
Works as a Pensioner
Joined on Apr 10, 2008
About me:

Canon G9
Olympus E-PM2, E-PL7, E-M10II, P & O Lenses, Samyang, M42 4x Pentax Asahi Takumars 50/135/200/300mm

Comments

Total: 339, showing: 1 – 20
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After all, this video is very educational and didactically well made.

Link | Posted on May 24, 2018 at 09:15 UTC as 37th comment
On article How the 50mm lens became 'Normal' (63 comments in total)
In reply to:

PowerG9atBlackForest: Contains a nonsense statement in one paragraph: "...For 35-mm motion-picture production, the 50-mm lens ... A 50-mm lens was an effective approximation of the focal length necessary to fill the diagonal dimensions of the 35-mm celluloid frame (43 mm) fully and consistently..."
The author is unaware of the fact that the format for "35-mm motion-picture production" is 18 x 24 mm with the diagonal dimension of 30 mm.
The author only put it right a few paragraphs later: "Just as it had for film, the 50-mm became a normal lens for photography because it was a reliable lens for completely and sharply filling the frame of a 35-mm photographic negative."

"In cinematography, a focal length roughly equivalent to twice the diagonal of the image projected within the camera is considered normal, since movies are typically viewed from a distance of about twice the screen diagonal."

I don't think the author of the article had this in mind - but it's an interesting point of view.

Anyway as a student, when I used to go to a cinema my budget told me what a distance I typically should have a view from ;)

Link | Posted on May 17, 2018 at 09:15 UTC
On article How the 50mm lens became 'Normal' (63 comments in total)

Contains a nonsense statement in one paragraph: "...For 35-mm motion-picture production, the 50-mm lens ... A 50-mm lens was an effective approximation of the focal length necessary to fill the diagonal dimensions of the 35-mm celluloid frame (43 mm) fully and consistently..."
The author is unaware of the fact that the format for "35-mm motion-picture production" is 18 x 24 mm with the diagonal dimension of 30 mm.
The author only put it right a few paragraphs later: "Just as it had for film, the 50-mm became a normal lens for photography because it was a reliable lens for completely and sharply filling the frame of a 35-mm photographic negative."

Link | Posted on May 14, 2018 at 14:57 UTC as 22nd comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Tungsten Nordstein: I love the photo. Most wildlife photography looks like CGI these days, Cabral is just taking things to their logical conclusion. Brilliant.

@ Roland K - why do you suppose that is a problem?

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2018 at 09:36 UTC
In reply to:

Atindra: Are those green lights real or LEDs?

glowing bugs,
palatable?

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2018 at 20:32 UTC
In reply to:

Alex Akai: If no flash is used, don't these guys (judges) know a long exposure at night will result in a blur of anything that moves !...Or are they dumb enough to think the animal stayed still until the shot was finished...?

At Alex: You know, ant eating only needs tiny movements when sucking them up. So, blurring probably will remain unrecorded.

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2018 at 20:27 UTC
In reply to:

Tungsten Nordstein: I love the photo. Most wildlife photography looks like CGI these days, Cabral is just taking things to their logical conclusion. Brilliant.

Quote: I also think there should be some (clearer) kind of hint that the ant eater is stuffed.
Question: How can an ant eater possibly eat ants when it is stuffed?

Link | Posted on Apr 28, 2018 at 20:22 UTC

Quoting Hillary: It promises "natural sharpness, unbelievable color reproduction, and a glowing bokeh united at every step of the aperture" ... whatever that means.

Well, it means that Dr. Rudolph's Plasmat was well known for that to a famously very high degree it met the technical requirements regarding the achromatization, i.e. the correction of the "Gauss error", or spherochromatic aberration, and that this project would like to give this idea a revival and surround it with a nostalgically chiming name.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2018 at 10:19 UTC as 25th comment

Well, Leica take the words "America first!" serious.

Link | Posted on Apr 5, 2018 at 11:47 UTC as 79th comment

Next comes a Todd-AO converter

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2018 at 20:21 UTC as 11th comment | 1 reply

The fact is that maximum (static) load-bearing capacity does not automatically mean the tripod has a high dynamic rigity and is well damped regarding vibrations.
An estimate: With the middle section fully extended, the camera on top will swing as much as 1 mm to either side when the points where the legs and the spider are interlinked move 0.1 mm, not considering frequency and duration of the oscillation .

Link | Posted on Mar 15, 2018 at 15:21 UTC as 9th comment
On article 10 photography books that are banned in Texas prisons (24 comments in total)
In reply to:

Wubslin: There are very good reasons - which you should be able to figure out for yourself - why convicted criminals should not have access to this material.

Photography books mention that photographers do shoot; "to shoot" is the verb imprisoned criminals should not have access to.

Link | Posted on Dec 16, 2017 at 21:18 UTC
In reply to:

Tequila MockingjayBird: Why rotations? It should be a ball with cameras that captures the 360 shot in one shot. Moving 360/panoramas suffer from moving objects such as birds, people, cars ,etc.

And how would you capture what happens inside the camera?

Link | Posted on Nov 29, 2017 at 21:46 UTC
In reply to:

PowerG9atBlackForest: Isn't it so nice to chat the length about silly-cheap DIY lighting modifiers, turning your household lights into studio lighting modifiers etc., etc. without ever reflecting on the quality of light, e.g. on the color rendering index CRI (or Ra) that can be achieved in the end?

It's not the mere CRI numbers that is important, it is the quality of light. May be you don't notice color deficiencies in your photographs or you may think they are not important, well.
An analysis of the light spectrum would help to detect where gaps are; you would be taken by surprise finding yellow too low and blue too strong, e.g. Things that seem white are not. Standard household reflectors, Styrofoam, Polysterene all are not purely white and often contain a blue component unnoticed to the eye. Even LEDs do extremely vary in quality; there are some cheap ones, there are some very good ones.
But if you are happy, why not?

Link | Posted on Nov 28, 2017 at 10:05 UTC

Isn't it so nice to chat the length about silly-cheap DIY lighting modifiers, turning your household lights into studio lighting modifiers etc., etc. without ever reflecting on the quality of light, e.g. on the color rendering index CRI (or Ra) that can be achieved in the end?

Link | Posted on Nov 27, 2017 at 21:48 UTC as 12th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Sirandar: The picture in this article is very misleading ......

AI couldn't upsample the pixelated image on the left without identifing and understanding the context (it's a feather of this type) and using a reference texture for modelling......

This algorithm may be able to recover those slightly out of focus and shutter shock images though.....

I agree to what Sirandar said. Understanding the context and the reference texture for modelling of all thinkable objects to come somewhen, to me it seems impossible.
AI also couldn't upsample the pixelated vertical leaf (is it a leaf?) on the right of the grasshopper photograph or wasn't it "allowed" to do so?

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2017 at 17:52 UTC
On article First samples: Leica Thambar-M 90mm F2.2 (222 comments in total)

Ok, now it is nice and enthusiasts probably will be able to produce some intriguing photographs. But guess what, in a short time we all we be sick and tired of that obtrusive atmosphere.

Link | Posted on Oct 30, 2017 at 21:27 UTC as 100th comment

May be the lens is more suitable for videos rather than stills.

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2017 at 10:27 UTC as 30th comment
In reply to:

PowerG9atBlackForest: When applying the Orton-effect to my regular photographs I can create similar images, and as an extra bonus, I will be able to modify the parameters.

(at) Roland:
i. Of course not, I will not be able to pre visualise when taking the regular image. I can guess how it may come out in the end. Every modification is left to the computer works.

ii. Yes, I agree. With Orton, there is a kind of enhanced color saturation (adjustable!) but there is also that characteristic sort of haze.

Link | Posted on Oct 18, 2017 at 10:23 UTC

When applying the Orton-effect to my regular photographs I can create similar images, and as an extra bonus, I will be able to modify the parameters.

Link | Posted on Oct 17, 2017 at 20:37 UTC as 79th comment | 3 replies
Total: 339, showing: 1 – 20
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