fPrime

fPrime

Lives in United States CA, United States
Joined on Jul 17, 2012

Comments

Total: 42, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Petzval 58mm real-world samples (58 comments in total)
In reply to:

fPrime: I'm not a fan of the swirly bokeh, but some of these samples have very nice 3D pop.

No wonder why the pop... only 4 elements in 3 groups. If they made this lens without the swirly bokeh it might be an excellent prime for general 3D pop.

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2016 at 22:46 UTC
On article Petzval 58mm real-world samples (58 comments in total)

I'm not a fan of the swirly bokeh, but some of these samples have very nice 3D pop.

Link | Posted on Sep 14, 2016 at 18:33 UTC as 10th comment | 3 replies
On article Throwback Thursday: the Samsung NV10 (77 comments in total)

Punchy and vibrant colors thanks to the CCD sensor, but a Schneider-KREUZNACH lens that renders everything shot with it flat as a pancake.

Link | Posted on Sep 1, 2016 at 15:01 UTC as 50th comment
On article Throwback Thursday: Canon EOS 5D (222 comments in total)
In reply to:

henrikbengtsson: And there they are again, those perfectly balanced images in terms of pleasing colors. I don't know what Canon and Adobe did back then, but they sure made images look better from scratch. There was a warmer, almost filmlike Fuji-touch which is more obvious now when comparing with todays super-contrasty profiles and - to be honest - not always great colors.

You can thank the the strict legacy CFA's that were used by both Canon and Nikon at the time. After 2007 the race for higher resolution and higher ISO performance drove both manufacturers to progressively weaken the CFA's in their later cameras to allow more light to reach the sensor at the expense of color fidelity.

Link | Posted on Aug 27, 2016 at 11:36 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Canon EOS 5D (222 comments in total)

I'm currently on two week holiday in central China with only my 5Dc and a solo 35mm 1.4L Mark 1 lens. As others have already mentioned, the colors and tonality produced by the 5Dc's huge full frame pixels and strict legacy CFA are unmatched by today's high megapixel monsters. Add a classic lens like the 35L
Mk 1 and you return with vibrant images that are rich in three dimensionality. Wouldn't trade this combo for a 5DSr as I prefer the color of the 5Dc and frankly don't need more than 12 MP resolution!

Link | Posted on Aug 26, 2016 at 14:03 UTC as 47th comment | 2 replies
On article Throwback Thursday: Canon EOS 5D (222 comments in total)

Excellent way to add some classic cameras into the comparator, DPR! The 5D Classic is perfect choice to start with as well based on the special place it holds in the evolution of digital cameras and the unique features it still offers today (low pixel density sensor with a strong legacy CFA).

Please consider the following classics for upcoming throwbacks... the Nikon D1x, D200, and D700 and the Fuji S5 Pro. Each are still treasured by photographers today for their special color quality.

Link | Posted on Aug 26, 2016 at 13:27 UTC as 48th comment
On article Photoshop CC 2015.5.1 available (89 comments in total)
In reply to:

fPrime: Hmm... looks like mostly bug fixes instead of feature enhancements again. I am following what Adobe is doing with CC but honestly still don't see anything substantial or critical to my work that they've added since going subscription.

Meanwhile I'm still entirely happy with my standalone Photoshop CS6 edition. Cost per month... nada. Best purchase I ever made in retrospect.

@ Nobby2016: Your point about ACR being orphaned is true... if that's their marketing strategy for CC then Adobe must think most people are still on the camera upgrade treadmill. Too bad for them that the market is showing the reverse.

Luckily for me I don't use ACR for RAW conversion and Canikon aren't releasing any newer cameras that appeal to my interests. ;-)

Link | Posted on Aug 9, 2016 at 17:04 UTC
On article Photoshop CC 2015.5.1 available (89 comments in total)

Hmm... looks like mostly bug fixes instead of feature enhancements again. I am following what Adobe is doing with CC but honestly still don't see anything substantial or critical to my work that they've added since going subscription.

Meanwhile I'm still entirely happy with my standalone Photoshop CS6 edition. Cost per month... nada. Best purchase I ever made in retrospect.

Link | Posted on Aug 9, 2016 at 16:24 UTC as 26th comment | 7 replies
On article An introduction to our studio test scene (110 comments in total)

I'm not opposed to the "new" studio test scene, but year(s) after launch it still has no older cameras in it's database... only cameras released in the last four years. Although it may be a surprise to the DPR editors, there still a lot of people who still shoot with a D700 or D3s. It'd be great to be able to compare these classics against the D5 or D810 on the comparator, wouldn't it? Similar examples could be found for Canon, Leica, Sony, Pentax, etc. Adding a handful of classic cameras to the comparator would reconnect it with the large user base still enjoying older tech.

Link | Posted on Aug 8, 2016 at 16:43 UTC as 40th comment | 3 replies

Thanks for posting a real world use of the tech. Although interesting to see, I leave with the impression that the Theta is a device that is broadly suitable for its time... quick disposable images for the age of posting disposable I-was-there selfies on Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat.

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2016 at 15:58 UTC as 22nd comment | 1 reply
On article DxO OpticsPro 11 brings advanced Raw noise reduction (110 comments in total)
In reply to:

Androole: Does anyone have any actual examples that shows that the PRIME noise reduction is worthwhile?

I've tried the "best" NR packages in the past (i.e. Topaz DeNoise) and find that they all still obliterate too much detail. I'm happy removing chroma noise which is dead easy in any package, but I haven't yet found a noise reduction solution for luminance noise that looks better than leaving it untouched. Your mileage and aesthetic preferences may vary.

@Mark9473 This is exactly the sort of image that can give a misleading impression of Prime NR. It's mostly bokeh with a touch of high complexity detail in the center that's been shot in wide spectrum daylight. Of course Prime looks good... the bokeh is infinitely plasticize-able. An image in poor quality light with fine textures is another story completely.

Link | Posted on Jun 4, 2016 at 02:05 UTC
On article DxO OpticsPro 11 brings advanced Raw noise reduction (110 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: DxO OP 10's PRIME NR is by far the best I've seen anywhere, and I've worked extensively with Dfine and DeNoise. And, it's one-click simple. A game-changer for this high-ISO low-light event photog shooting with Micro Four Thirds.

I have to backup what curio77 said above after working with DxO 11 for the past day on several images of mine from various cameras. I was interested to see if DxO merited purchase specifically as a backup RAW convertor for high ISO images.

Overall I find that the color accuracy, tonal rendition, and even high ISO noise reduction still look better in C1 Pro. Also, the time to get to those results was faster in C1 Pro if not immediate with default settings. With DxO the default starting points often looked off to me and then it took a lot of clicking to get the color and tonal balance right or more natural.

The good news is that Prime NR indeed appears to be faster and didn't produce the posterization in shadow areas that I saw it render in earlier editions. The bad news is that it still plasticizes textured surfaces far too much for my liking. I don't shoot anything above ISO 6400 on my D700 but at least up to this ISO range C1 Pro produces a better balance of noise reduction.

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2016 at 23:55 UTC
In reply to:

fPrime: Very in tune with the trend in lens design these days... big, heavy, sharp, and well corrected but with relatively flat, characterless rendering.

I could tolerate a little CA and less than perfect bokeh in trade for more 3D pop. Over-correcting the lens for aberrations also seems to make it flatter.

Link | Posted on May 19, 2016 at 16:31 UTC

Very in tune with the trend in lens design these days... big, heavy, sharp, and well corrected but with relatively flat, characterless rendering.

Link | Posted on May 19, 2016 at 15:43 UTC as 19th comment | 11 replies
On article Benchmark performance: Nikon D810 in-depth review (255 comments in total)
In reply to:

Don Sata: Nice review but is it still relevant two years late?

No, but it made a vacation in Iceland a tax write-off or an all expense paid extravaganza for somebody.

Link | Posted on May 12, 2016 at 23:21 UTC

Lovely, a Leica camera with only the "essentials." I guess building it with a wide latitude CMOS sensor was also a must to allow M-D shooters to fix their pictures with the "essential" RAW post processing required when shooting without an LCD?

Note to Leica, read the user forums here on occasion. Your M9 customers weren't asking for a CMOS camera without LCD because they needed more anticipation in their photography. They wanted an updated, narrow latitude CCD based camera for a film-like, ultimate picture quality shooting experience.

Instead of creating something unique with a real differentiator worth spending real money on like that, you broke something that didn't need fixing. Good luck with that!

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2016 at 17:58 UTC as 102nd comment
In reply to:

fPrime: DPR: We understand that the color filter array on the D5 sensor has been changed to improve low light performance. Can you comment on this?

NIKON: It’s very difficult to explain exactly how we achieved this, but the basic concept is that we improved light-gathering ability. And by doing that we reduced noise and increased sensitivity.

Thanks, Nikon... with every iteration you give us optically thinner CFA's to support your drive for higher ISO's. But then color fidelity suffers from weak CFA's that are less able to strictly separate light into distinct color channels. The RAW color transforms used to compensate for this on Macbeth color charts in turn twist neighboring subtle hues in unintended directions. No wonder why color enthusiasts users don't upgrade their old cameras. Better to buy another legacy color champ body on Craigslist.

IMHO the 35mm camera industry jumped the shark for high ISO performance somewhere after 2007. The MF crowd followed suit much later with the introduction of CMOS sensors for CCD in 2014. Before 2008 all of the major 35mm manufacturers held to strict CFA designs as originally laid out by Kodak. After 2008 they began tinkering with the CFA to let more light get through to the sensor.

My personal choices for pre-2008 bodies with strong legacy CFA's has been the Nikon D700 (huge pixel CMOS), Canon 5D Classic (huge pixel CMOS), Nikon D200 (big pixel CCD), and Nikon D1x (big pixel CCD). Note the importance of pixel size... the more sensitive (bigger) the native pixel well is, the better it can support a strong CFA. In the era before micro lenses and back side illumination, CMOS was significantly less sensitive than CCD so it is best to stick to low density designs (12MP) for FX. CCD can support a strong CFA with resolutions of up to 10MP in crop sensors.

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2016 at 21:41 UTC
In reply to:

fPrime: Automated AF adjustment for high resolution sensors has been way overdue for years now. This firmware option should have premiered in 2012 with the launch of the D800 with it's woeful left AF focus issues. The fact that this is launching in 2016 with only support for calibrating the center AF point under one type of lighting should be an embarrassment for Nikon.

When this can be automated for all AF points at all zoom positions under multiple light sources, it'll be a worthwhile upgrade. Until then let's call this very minor improvement to DSLR focusing tech what it really is... a half-baked step in the right direction. Underwhelmed.

+1. Think about it, primeshooter... AF adjustment is purely an offset value stored in a data table within camera memory. With flash memory as big and inexpensive as it has become today it's a crime that Nikon created this algorithm to only handle one offset value per lens.

There isn't a technical limitation to overcome here. Nikon is simply too lazy to write the program code for storing more values. That's why I'm tough on them regards AF adjustment and wish DPR would follow suit.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2016 at 22:59 UTC

Automated AF adjustment for high resolution sensors has been way overdue for years now. This firmware option should have premiered in 2012 with the launch of the D800 with it's woeful left AF focus issues. The fact that this is launching in 2016 with only support for calibrating the center AF point under one type of lighting should be an embarrassment for Nikon.

When this can be automated for all AF points at all zoom positions under multiple light sources, it'll be a worthwhile upgrade. Until then let's call this very minor improvement to DSLR focusing tech what it really is... a half-baked step in the right direction. Underwhelmed.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2016 at 03:00 UTC as 27th comment | 5 replies

DPR: We understand that the color filter array on the D5 sensor has been changed to improve low light performance. Can you comment on this?

NIKON: It’s very difficult to explain exactly how we achieved this, but the basic concept is that we improved light-gathering ability. And by doing that we reduced noise and increased sensitivity.

Thanks, Nikon... with every iteration you give us optically thinner CFA's to support your drive for higher ISO's. But then color fidelity suffers from weak CFA's that are less able to strictly separate light into distinct color channels. The RAW color transforms used to compensate for this on Macbeth color charts in turn twist neighboring subtle hues in unintended directions. No wonder why color enthusiasts users don't upgrade their old cameras. Better to buy another legacy color champ body on Craigslist.

Link | Posted on Mar 30, 2016 at 18:52 UTC as 13th comment | 2 replies
Total: 42, showing: 1 – 20
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