Mr Sincere

Lives in United States Saint Louis, MO, United States
Works as a Software Engineer
Joined on Feb 26, 2010

Comments

Total: 9, showing: 1 – 9
On article Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 Review (1018 comments in total)
In reply to:

armanius: I'm enjoying my LX100. Unless I'm missing an option somewhere, the auto-ISO implementation is horrible. Camera refuses to go past ISO 1600 even when the shutter speed has dropped to 1/8" at full zoom (when in aperture priority).

mpgxsvcd -- I'm not sure Program Priority is the cure all you portray it as when the topic of Auto ISO and it's shortcomings on the LX100 comes up.

As a very quick example, I looked at the scene next to me here: indoor ambient light, rather dark, no moving subjects. I'd like to take the photo at 24mm with the widest possible aperture, a shutter speed of 1/15 and the lowest ISO for the correct exposure.

So I throw both dials to A, and see what happens: 1.7, 1/60 for a shutter speed and 1600 for the ISO. I'm sure that picture would turn out fine, but I know I'd get a nicer photo at 1/15 and ISO 400.

On a lark, I tried Intelligent ISO instead, and it picked 1/60 also.

So Program Priority wouldn't give me the capture I want in this example. I could do it in full manual just fine, but without exposure compensation. Aperture priority would pick 1/60 again. Shutter priority is really the best option in scenarios like this.

Link | Posted on Nov 20, 2014 at 00:04 UTC
In reply to:

bobbarber: Disclaimer: I'm a hypocrite, because I've bought converters for compact cameras before.

Comment: If you're buying converter lenses for your compact or fixed-lens camera, isn't that telling you that you need/should have bought an interchangeable lens camera in the first place?

Not really. If you're primarily looking for a smaller sized camera with a fast 35mm f/2.0 lens and APS-C size sensor, I don't think there's an interchangeable lens option that can equal the x100s in terms of the combo of size, cost and image quality. A micro four thirds camera with the 17mm 1.8 would come close, but wouldn't give quite as much subject isolation (ie, "bokeh"), and (debatebly) wouldn't have as nice of image quality.

If you're the type who prefers a fast 35mm prime for most of your photography, it's nice to know you could pick up an x100/s to fulfill your basic needs in an ideal package, but still have options open for something wider or with more reach for those times you feel you need it.

In other words, if you think 90% of your shooting will be with a 35mm prime, but want to keep your options open for that other 10%, a x100/s and the teleconverters would be an excellent option.

Link | Posted on May 2, 2014 at 15:16 UTC
On article Just Posted: Fujifilm X20 review (175 comments in total)
In reply to:

reuptake: I don't really understand why this review didn't mention one very obvious issue with X20: you can't use shutter faster than 1/1000 when using aperture 2.0 or similar. This is a big problem when taking pictures in a sunshine.

While a built in ND filter is certainly more convenient, I believe you can use a screw on ND filter with the x20, if you have the appropriate adaptor. This is far from ideal, but it's at least better than the rx100, where there's no way to use an ND filter (although I remember reading something about people gluing filters on... ick.)

You are correct though, in that this is a big advantage of the compact zooms like the XZ-2 and LX7 that do have a built in ND filter, and even a higher max shutter speed (and lower base ISO in the LX7).

Link | Posted on Apr 30, 2013 at 19:06 UTC
On article Just Posted: Fujifilm X20 review (175 comments in total)
In reply to:

HowaboutRAW: Could we readers get some more raw samples than just the test scene?

Look at the bottom of page 8 of the review.

Link | Posted on Apr 30, 2013 at 14:46 UTC
In reply to:

The Davinator: Should have been a 35 equivalent lens

Agreed. I was about to get excited about this camera until I saw that. Between that wide angle, and 2.8 lens, it's going to be a challenge to get any sort of DOF control with that fixed lens. And that, to me, diminishes some of the appeal of the larger sensor.

Link | Posted on Mar 5, 2013 at 04:49 UTC
On article Just posted: Fujifilm X-E1 Review (517 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joed700: I'm surprised by how this camera received the Gold Award! I was planning on getting this camera but the fact that it requires occasionally reboots changed my mind. I would think that issue like this should had been resolved before Fujifilm starting charging its customers $1,000 for a beta version of their product. Let's hope a firmware update will follow soon.

I think "requires occasional reboots" is probably overstating the issue, by quite a bit. If you hop on over to the Fuji forum, you'll see approximately... zero... mentions of this supposed issue, and quite a few people surprised to see it mentioned in the review (since it's never been mentioned as an issue before).

For what it's worth, I've never had a crash on my X-E1, or anything happened that required a reboot.

Link | Posted on Mar 2, 2013 at 02:02 UTC
On article Roundup: Enthusiast Zoom Compact Cameras (414 comments in total)
In reply to:

airina: I recently purchased XZ-2 (having read this review) and I have been extremely disappointed with its focus performance. It can't lock on most of the time indoors with low light levels. So I end up being forced to use manual focus - it works great, but definetely not for moving objects: by the time I'm done setting it up, the moment is gone (when taking pictures of my child).

Everything else in the camera works quite well for me.

The focusing problem is really bothering me though and I am looking to buy a different camera that would perform better indoors - in low light conditions. Could anyone recommend what to go with, out of your own experience?.. Any advise will be much appreciated!!

Thanks for contributing to the discussion Airina. It makes sense you'd find the same thing occurring when you manually select a focus point in multipoint focus mode. In that case, the camera is probably temporarily reverting to single point focus after you selected the focus point. If I get bored tonight, I'll try to run the same test manually selecting the focus point.

You're absolutely correct in you assessment of how difficult it can be to work with multipoint focus. I personally can't stand having the camera try to guess where I want to focus, which is why I've never even tried to use it until I started experimenting with this issue. You're probably correct thought that the camera looks for the area of most contrast.

I also love the camera, and can't seem to think of a good replacement, for my purposes (the P7700s raw write times would be a deal killer for me). Hopefully this is something Olympus can fix in a firmware update.

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2013 at 17:25 UTC
On article Roundup: Enthusiast Zoom Compact Cameras (414 comments in total)
In reply to:

airina: I recently purchased XZ-2 (having read this review) and I have been extremely disappointed with its focus performance. It can't lock on most of the time indoors with low light levels. So I end up being forced to use manual focus - it works great, but definetely not for moving objects: by the time I'm done setting it up, the moment is gone (when taking pictures of my child).

Everything else in the camera works quite well for me.

The focusing problem is really bothering me though and I am looking to buy a different camera that would perform better indoors - in low light conditions. Could anyone recommend what to go with, out of your own experience?.. Any advise will be much appreciated!!

For anyone wondering about the autofocus performance of the xz-2, I've thrown together this short video demonstrating how bad the autofocus is when using a single, center point at full telephoto:

https://vimeo.com/56734277

As you can see, focus is much more snappy and reliable when using multipoint focusing (even though it's consistently choosing the same focus point I manually selected). In my opinion, this appears to be some sort of firmware bug.

Luckily, using the touch screen to chose a focus point is fast and easy, as is manual focus using the nice big focus ring and MF lever.

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2013 at 04:29 UTC
On article Roundup: Enthusiast Zoom Compact Cameras (414 comments in total)
In reply to:

airina: I recently purchased XZ-2 (having read this review) and I have been extremely disappointed with its focus performance. It can't lock on most of the time indoors with low light levels. So I end up being forced to use manual focus - it works great, but definetely not for moving objects: by the time I'm done setting it up, the moment is gone (when taking pictures of my child).

Everything else in the camera works quite well for me.

The focusing problem is really bothering me though and I am looking to buy a different camera that would perform better indoors - in low light conditions. Could anyone recommend what to go with, out of your own experience?.. Any advise will be much appreciated!!

I also just picked up an XZ-2, after reading this review and being quite impressed with the samples. And I have to agree completely with your comments about the terrible autofocus performance. And not just in low light. Even in average lighting, I find the camera hits focus maybe 50% of the time at full telephoto. One odd thing myself and someone in the forums noticed: Focus performance is much better when using multi-point autofocus, in comparison to single point (center point, in my case.). Which is pretty strange.

I was hoping I just had a defective camera, because I otherwise love the thing. But hearing you echo the same sentiments doesn't give me hope that another xz-2 will be any different.

Note: I'm comparing the xz-2 against the xz-1, nex-c3, x100, e-pl2 and countless other CDAF cameras I've used extensively over the years, and the xz-2 is way behind them all in AF performance. It definitely feels like a bug in the firmware, to me.

Link | Posted on Jan 2, 2013 at 01:10 UTC
Total: 9, showing: 1 – 9