VividExposures

Lives in United States Atlanta, United States
Joined on Jun 29, 2009

Comments

Total: 29, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Fred Mueller: With software like DXO Viewpoint 2 and now the new perspective correction tool in Adobe Camera Raw as wall as the traditional Transform functions in Photoshop, you really don't need the shift function to make verticals parallel in RE/architectural photography. Nor do you need to shoot into a space with your camera leveled (and on a tripod).

The standard reply to this claim is that software interpolation robs sharpness - is theoretically true - but practically speaking, not much of an issue at all.

Here is a Drop Box link to a recent mundane RE shoot. Most of these shots are 3-5 frame HDR brackets (Nik HDR EFX Pro) and have been geometrically manipulated by software. Tell me they are not sharp enough for intended purpose ... ? Most were shot with a Nikon 14-24 and D750.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/qrz85xq0zpxjsfi/AADIBLqpF10JBnB_qFfINKz4a?dl=0

Photographers who want to chase the RE market should buy a general purpose very wide zoom first and learn virtual correction first.

120 degrees is ridiculous in mine and probably a large percentage of mid to high-end RE photographers. Use what works for you. I am just defending Nikon's release of a wider pc-e. It has a place. Sorry you don't understand.

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2016 at 17:58 UTC
In reply to:

Fred Mueller: With software like DXO Viewpoint 2 and now the new perspective correction tool in Adobe Camera Raw as wall as the traditional Transform functions in Photoshop, you really don't need the shift function to make verticals parallel in RE/architectural photography. Nor do you need to shoot into a space with your camera leveled (and on a tripod).

The standard reply to this claim is that software interpolation robs sharpness - is theoretically true - but practically speaking, not much of an issue at all.

Here is a Drop Box link to a recent mundane RE shoot. Most of these shots are 3-5 frame HDR brackets (Nik HDR EFX Pro) and have been geometrically manipulated by software. Tell me they are not sharp enough for intended purpose ... ? Most were shot with a Nikon 14-24 and D750.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/qrz85xq0zpxjsfi/AADIBLqpF10JBnB_qFfINKz4a?dl=0

Photographers who want to chase the RE market should buy a general purpose very wide zoom first and learn virtual correction first.

To understand its usefulness. Apparently I was wrong. So let me give you a specific hypothetical. Forget about using a 12mm because while that would work, 120 degrees is just ridiculous. You are trying to maintain as much image as possible while maintaining the same aspect ratio in post. You are in a small bathroom. You have to have the camera at a specific height to show a certain amount of the sink (in other words bending down isn't an option). Not using a tripod and geared head isn't an option either. You can't shoot in portrait orientation. In order to show the floor, you can compose with all the above requirements and simply shift down to include the floor. Problem solved. If that doesn't paint a clear picture I don't know what would. Having the ability to shift is highly desirable in all kinds of situations. Again this would apply to higher-end applications in most scenarios. You sound like more of a high volume RE photographer who just doesn't get it. That is OK, and nothing wrong with your strategy. Perhaps this lens just isn't for you. It would certainly take more time on-site to use. That with the high initial investment I agree with you. I currently just don't see the ROI at that price point. Peace.

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2016 at 16:56 UTC
In reply to:

Fred Mueller: With software like DXO Viewpoint 2 and now the new perspective correction tool in Adobe Camera Raw as wall as the traditional Transform functions in Photoshop, you really don't need the shift function to make verticals parallel in RE/architectural photography. Nor do you need to shoot into a space with your camera leveled (and on a tripod).

The standard reply to this claim is that software interpolation robs sharpness - is theoretically true - but practically speaking, not much of an issue at all.

Here is a Drop Box link to a recent mundane RE shoot. Most of these shots are 3-5 frame HDR brackets (Nik HDR EFX Pro) and have been geometrically manipulated by software. Tell me they are not sharp enough for intended purpose ... ? Most were shot with a Nikon 14-24 and D750.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/qrz85xq0zpxjsfi/AADIBLqpF10JBnB_qFfINKz4a?dl=0

Photographers who want to chase the RE market should buy a general purpose very wide zoom first and learn virtual correction first.

"You can't shift wider in any direction. If you shift down you will cut the top."

Ding ding ding. I think we have a winner! Took you awhile. That is the point. If that wasn't acceptable for whatever reason you could just do a pano. Otherwise less ceiling, more floor. Compose higher and not have converging verticals, etc...

120 degrees is kind of ridiculous. It must be really hard to tame that beast.

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2016 at 12:44 UTC
In reply to:

Fred Mueller: With software like DXO Viewpoint 2 and now the new perspective correction tool in Adobe Camera Raw as wall as the traditional Transform functions in Photoshop, you really don't need the shift function to make verticals parallel in RE/architectural photography. Nor do you need to shoot into a space with your camera leveled (and on a tripod).

The standard reply to this claim is that software interpolation robs sharpness - is theoretically true - but practically speaking, not much of an issue at all.

Here is a Drop Box link to a recent mundane RE shoot. Most of these shots are 3-5 frame HDR brackets (Nik HDR EFX Pro) and have been geometrically manipulated by software. Tell me they are not sharp enough for intended purpose ... ? Most were shot with a Nikon 14-24 and D750.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/qrz85xq0zpxjsfi/AADIBLqpF10JBnB_qFfINKz4a?dl=0

Photographers who want to chase the RE market should buy a general purpose very wide zoom first and learn virtual correction first.

Who said anything about wider? You can shift down to include things like a floor and not include things you don't want like a ceiling. No pano involved. Just a single exposure of something you can't do with a 15mm lens on full frame. I am assuming you are using a crop sensor with that 12mm. So I have a wider fov than you and still can't do the things I describe in my original post. I had the 24mm pc-e at one point. I understand shifts just fine. You on the other hand not so much. You can lead a horse to water, but can't make them drink. Have a good one.

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2016 at 04:50 UTC
In reply to:

Fred Mueller: With software like DXO Viewpoint 2 and now the new perspective correction tool in Adobe Camera Raw as wall as the traditional Transform functions in Photoshop, you really don't need the shift function to make verticals parallel in RE/architectural photography. Nor do you need to shoot into a space with your camera leveled (and on a tripod).

The standard reply to this claim is that software interpolation robs sharpness - is theoretically true - but practically speaking, not much of an issue at all.

Here is a Drop Box link to a recent mundane RE shoot. Most of these shots are 3-5 frame HDR brackets (Nik HDR EFX Pro) and have been geometrically manipulated by software. Tell me they are not sharp enough for intended purpose ... ? Most were shot with a Nikon 14-24 and D750.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/qrz85xq0zpxjsfi/AADIBLqpF10JBnB_qFfINKz4a?dl=0

Photographers who want to chase the RE market should buy a general purpose very wide zoom first and learn virtual correction first.

For someone that owned a tilt shift it kind of amazes me you don't understand its use for RE. Your statement simply isn't true. Nothing wrong with the 12mm though. I have heard good things.

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2016 at 03:28 UTC
In reply to:

Fred Mueller: With software like DXO Viewpoint 2 and now the new perspective correction tool in Adobe Camera Raw as wall as the traditional Transform functions in Photoshop, you really don't need the shift function to make verticals parallel in RE/architectural photography. Nor do you need to shoot into a space with your camera leveled (and on a tripod).

The standard reply to this claim is that software interpolation robs sharpness - is theoretically true - but practically speaking, not much of an issue at all.

Here is a Drop Box link to a recent mundane RE shoot. Most of these shots are 3-5 frame HDR brackets (Nik HDR EFX Pro) and have been geometrically manipulated by software. Tell me they are not sharp enough for intended purpose ... ? Most were shot with a Nikon 14-24 and D750.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/qrz85xq0zpxjsfi/AADIBLqpF10JBnB_qFfINKz4a?dl=0

Photographers who want to chase the RE market should buy a general purpose very wide zoom first and learn virtual correction first.

Nothing I mentioned requires tilt. It does however require shift. People shoot with 24mm on a full frame camera everyday with incredible results. Wide enough for me? No. I shoot RE with the Zeiss 15mm. I definitely need shift capabilities though and the 19mm on a Nikon is the best it is going to get. I just think it is a little overpriced at the moment. You keep confusing things referencing Canon's 17mm.

Link | Posted on Nov 23, 2016 at 21:01 UTC
In reply to:

Fred Mueller: With software like DXO Viewpoint 2 and now the new perspective correction tool in Adobe Camera Raw as wall as the traditional Transform functions in Photoshop, you really don't need the shift function to make verticals parallel in RE/architectural photography. Nor do you need to shoot into a space with your camera leveled (and on a tripod).

The standard reply to this claim is that software interpolation robs sharpness - is theoretically true - but practically speaking, not much of an issue at all.

Here is a Drop Box link to a recent mundane RE shoot. Most of these shots are 3-5 frame HDR brackets (Nik HDR EFX Pro) and have been geometrically manipulated by software. Tell me they are not sharp enough for intended purpose ... ? Most were shot with a Nikon 14-24 and D750.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/qrz85xq0zpxjsfi/AADIBLqpF10JBnB_qFfINKz4a?dl=0

Photographers who want to chase the RE market should buy a general purpose very wide zoom first and learn virtual correction first.

No offense meant, but I don't think you understand shifts. This is a 19mm lens and you are correct the the fov is the same as other 19mm lenses though.

Link | Posted on Nov 23, 2016 at 18:51 UTC
In reply to:

Fred Mueller: With software like DXO Viewpoint 2 and now the new perspective correction tool in Adobe Camera Raw as wall as the traditional Transform functions in Photoshop, you really don't need the shift function to make verticals parallel in RE/architectural photography. Nor do you need to shoot into a space with your camera leveled (and on a tripod).

The standard reply to this claim is that software interpolation robs sharpness - is theoretically true - but practically speaking, not much of an issue at all.

Here is a Drop Box link to a recent mundane RE shoot. Most of these shots are 3-5 frame HDR brackets (Nik HDR EFX Pro) and have been geometrically manipulated by software. Tell me they are not sharp enough for intended purpose ... ? Most were shot with a Nikon 14-24 and D750.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/qrz85xq0zpxjsfi/AADIBLqpF10JBnB_qFfINKz4a?dl=0

Photographers who want to chase the RE market should buy a general purpose very wide zoom first and learn virtual correction first.

Tight bathroom and trying to show the floor, but shooting in portrait orientation is not an option. Shooting any room and being able to show more floor and less ceiling. Shooting a kitchen where you have to compose high to avoid showing under the cabinets, wanting to feature the countertops, all while again showing as much of the floor as possible. Like someone mentioned shooting commercial building exteriors. The list goes on and on. A wide tilt shift is something that separates you from your competitors. Higher end RE, builders, interior decorators all care about this kind of stuff. To say that it is unnecessary and you can replicate it in pp is kind of ridiculous imho. Not saying I will be buying this lens, but I recognize it's value to a pro.

Link | Posted on Nov 23, 2016 at 15:52 UTC
On article Air Stylus turns your iPad into a graphics tablet (61 comments in total)
In reply to:

VividExposures: I played around with the new Surface Pro 3 today, and I was very impressed with the experience. I tried to imagine using the "pen" in Photoshop and Lightroom. I am assuming these devices all just give up the pressure sensitivity levels of a dedicated Wacom tablet.

I saw that and came back to correct my comment. Surely the one I was using had the default settings. I have tried a few Wacom tablets and the Surface didn't seem very sensitive to pressure. If the specs you mentioned are correct, it is an incredible value for a digital artist on the go. I will be using it for shooting tethered via USB. I had tried to use a Nexus 7 with a CamRanger, but when using liveview it only zooms to 100% and you can't pan the image. That is a deal-breaker for me and I am doing a return. Thanks for the specs :)

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2014 at 14:44 UTC
On article Air Stylus turns your iPad into a graphics tablet (61 comments in total)

I played around with the new Surface Pro 3 today, and I was very impressed with the experience. I tried to imagine using the "pen" in Photoshop and Lightroom. I am assuming these devices all just give up the pressure sensitivity levels of a dedicated Wacom tablet.

Link | Posted on Jun 21, 2014 at 19:27 UTC as 16th comment | 3 replies
On article Is it true? New service detects processed photos (89 comments in total)

"Izitru says its image tests examine how different cameras store files and looks at the artifacts that are introduced when images are saved multiple times."

If that is true it should work for more cameras.

Link | Posted on May 7, 2014 at 13:36 UTC as 27th comment
On article DxO releases Optics Pro 9.1 (38 comments in total)
In reply to:

Prognathous: The upgrade from v8.x is now $49. Any opinions on whether the improvements are worth it? I usually upgrade every other version, but I have to admit the new NR looks impressive...

Upgrade is $39 for me ;)

Link | Posted on Dec 8, 2013 at 23:14 UTC

I think the low light test target shots need to be the same crop to be fair.

Link | Posted on Aug 30, 2013 at 17:32 UTC as 100th comment

Or you could just use a nice windows tablet and call it a day ;)

Link | Posted on May 2, 2013 at 18:29 UTC as 21st comment | 3 replies

This seriously made my day!

Link | Posted on Mar 25, 2013 at 14:22 UTC as 123rd comment
Total: 29, showing: 1 – 20
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