Mark Roberts

Lives in United States Fort Collins, United States
Works as a Engineer
Has a website at www.Harbortronics.com
Joined on May 1, 2000
About me:

Chief Engineer at Harbortronics.com. Have been developing electronic products for a long time! Since 1999, I've been developing time-lapse camera equipment, and some very interesting underwater camera equipment.

Comments

Total: 32, showing: 1 – 20
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Good Stuff! Real-world craftsmanship, long term thinking, valued employees, and high technology. There aren't many companies like this anymore.

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2017 at 21:11 UTC as 19th comment | 1 reply

This was the camera that stimulated my interest in digital photography, and spawned Harbortronics! 18 years later, going strong :)

Link | Posted on Feb 2, 2017 at 15:52 UTC as 67th comment

Someone who has some skills at modeling, manufacturing, and design spent a lot of time to design, prototype, refine, develop the manufacturing processes for, and then build this thing. I'm all for art, but that's not what this is... is it?
Bizarre waste of effort.

Link | Posted on Jan 18, 2017 at 00:03 UTC as 61st comment
In reply to:

Mark Roberts: A wired release to control any number of cameras simultaneously is quite easy to do, at low cost. Doing it through WiFi or networked allows connection of the images, but ye-old shutter release connectors are so much better for triggering (IMHO).

There are lots of nice things you can do with the camera networked, but most of that would seem to be unessential to the task. Remote Live view to a whole bunch of cameras would take more time to handle than simply manually adjusting each lens focus. You'd have to set the camera angle physically, so why not set the focus at that time as well. I'm not trying to poo-poo the product, just mentioning that if you want simultaneous trigger of a bunch of cameras, it's quite simple and cheap using wires.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2017 at 20:18 UTC
In reply to:

Mark Roberts: A wired release to control any number of cameras simultaneously is quite easy to do, at low cost. Doing it through WiFi or networked allows connection of the images, but ye-old shutter release connectors are so much better for triggering (IMHO).

The majority of DSLR cameras have a remote control port... DC2 or 10 pin ports on Nikon, E3 or N3 ports on Canon, and a variety of others. They all have a two signal activation method: Half Press (or metering) to wake the camera and set the focus and exposure, and then Full press to take the picture, with very little additional delay. It's quite easy to wire a number of cameras in parallel. We've done this a number of times for stereo and other multiple camera arrays for our customers at Harbortronics.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2017 at 01:57 UTC

A wired release to control any number of cameras simultaneously is quite easy to do, at low cost. Doing it through WiFi or networked allows connection of the images, but ye-old shutter release connectors are so much better for triggering (IMHO).

Link | Posted on Jan 9, 2017 at 19:57 UTC as 11th comment | 6 replies

Don't personally care about increasing video above 1080P, but would sure like to see higher dynamic range. Oh, wait, isn't that what we've been saying about stills cameras? 10bit processing is a step forward.

Link | Posted on Jan 7, 2017 at 22:59 UTC as 10th comment
In reply to:

Mark Roberts: It's just another 'rugged camera', but this has an extra-housing-needed for the 60m depth. Sorry, not a Nikonos.

True, I hadn't really given the 1" sensor any weight. I've used several other rugged cameras, with their tiny sensors, and while they are great for outdoor adventures, their image quality is lacking. Perhaps this one will be decent!

Link | Posted on Nov 24, 2016 at 18:10 UTC
In reply to:

Peter G: They haven't really said anything new. Super/Ultra capacitors have been fast charging and extremely long lasting for ages.

The capacitor problem is one of energy storage capacity. At BEST they have 10% the capacity of Lithium Batteries by Mass.

So your 20 gram phone battery becomes a 200 gram battery, that weighs more than your phone.

There is continual hype around this idea, mainly to attract investors. But it would be foolish to invest a dime until they can show you a testable prototype that actually has reasonable storage capacity.

I agree... the hype re-supercaps continues...

Link | Posted on Nov 23, 2016 at 22:00 UTC

It's just another 'rugged camera', but this has an extra-housing-needed for the 60m depth. Sorry, not a Nikonos.

Link | Posted on Nov 23, 2016 at 21:57 UTC as 22nd comment | 2 replies

Beautiful work! While loads of our customers capture projects that last years, their resulting videos generally lack much creative vision. The use of multiple perspectives, and smoothing techniques really help, but the composition and editing, and use of multiple time-scales in this video are what really make this outstanding.

Link | Posted on Jun 13, 2016 at 18:48 UTC as 40th comment
On article Canon EOS 80D Field Test: Barney builds a boat (221 comments in total)

I Love it!
I lived in the Seattle area for 25 years, started Harbortronics (time-lapse camera systems) in a basement in Gig Harbor. I used to have a kayak, have been to Wooden Boat Center, and recognize every place you filmed. I'm in Colorado now, but once in a while I miss the PNW. Your little film definitely tugged at some heart strings :)

Link | Posted on May 25, 2016 at 21:50 UTC as 43rd comment
In reply to:

Mark Roberts: Length 3.8"... is this at 18mm, or 36.4mm or 200mm? It seems all lens manufacturers only report the shortest possible arrangement. What's the length at 200mm? Looks like a great time-lapse lens.

Good range of zoom, low cost, don't need VR...

Link | Posted on Aug 8, 2015 at 19:28 UTC

Length 3.8"... is this at 18mm, or 36.4mm or 200mm? It seems all lens manufacturers only report the shortest possible arrangement. What's the length at 200mm? Looks like a great time-lapse lens.

Link | Posted on Aug 8, 2015 at 01:28 UTC as 14th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

mpgxsvcd: The only thing that would get me excited about this camera is if you said it had 4K @ 60 FPS. 1080p @ 60 FPS isn’t even acceptable now that the GoPro has excellent 2.7K @ 60 FPS.

Do we really need a pixel count race, again??

Link | Posted on Mar 6, 2015 at 00:33 UTC
In reply to:

Timmbits: The flat shape is very impractical;
they should make them cylindrical (as Panasonic did a very long time ago as an alternative to the gopro, but unfortunately didn't seem to have any success (that's a failure from marketing, not because of the product))
The cylinder is more aerodynamic, harder to snag and bang on things, easier to mount on things like the side of helmets.
This is really playing it safe.
Wish more would innovate.

However... this does tell you for how much those cameras costing hundreds more SHOULD be selling for - what they are really worth!

For Cylindrical, have a look at the ReplayXD cameras.

Link | Posted on Mar 6, 2015 at 00:30 UTC
On article Up close: The beauty of butterfly wings (47 comments in total)

Here is another gallery of microscopic imaging. Focus stacking, all sorts of technology, and much it was done years ago.
http://www.hart3d.com/pages/gallery-content/index.html

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2014 at 15:29 UTC as 15th comment
On article A look inside Sigma's lens factory (89 comments in total)

Very classy! I so wish media would get out of the habit of blasting stuff into our faces and ears. This was beautiful, and inspires me to pay more attention to Sigma offerings.

Link | Posted on Feb 15, 2014 at 16:01 UTC as 32nd comment
On article Tamrac launches rugged-looking photo messenger bags (106 comments in total)

I'm amazed how few haters are checking in about a bag review.

Link | Posted on Feb 4, 2014 at 15:46 UTC as 28th comment
On article Sony a7R teardown! Roger Cicala gets his hands dirty (135 comments in total)

Ahhh, reminds me of the days I spend modifying Nikon 990s, and then D70s. Multiple wires to desolder/resolder, assemblies shoved into nooks and crannies. Good times. The new Sony looks positively civilized!

Clearly this design took a lot of work to make look simple. This was no slap dash effort to make a camera to tiptoe into a new corner of the market. They appear to be serious about making these cameras.

This is a different spin on reviewing a camera, and I like it! Thanks for the article.

Link | Posted on Jan 30, 2014 at 17:25 UTC as 33rd comment
Total: 32, showing: 1 – 20
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