Macist

Joined on May 3, 2008

Comments

Total: 46, showing: 21 – 40
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On article Just Posted: Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX200V review (130 comments in total)

The quality seems to have been a bit improved over the 100V (take a look at the comparison shots -- it's particularly evident when you look at the Paul Smith clock dial (you can't even read it in the 100V shot). I had the 100V and I was very happy with the overall quality, but then I am not a pixel-peeper. The 200V does seem to have the sharpness turned on a bit high, though, and it seems to over-saturate a bit.

I gave away my 100V, because I found the GPS function useless for travel -- the GPS turns off when the camera is off, so it has to lock every time the camera powers on. Which means that most photos taken spontaneously are not tagged by the GPS. I really wish DPR would start offering more detail on such aspects of GPS (Panasonic does it best on their compacts, BTW, with the option of leaving the GPS on when the camera is off, thus it's always ready to tag).

I went to Nikon Coolpix 510, and I like the IQ a tad better. The GPS is also better, with the option of leaving it on.

Link | Posted on May 19, 2012 at 01:14 UTC as 5th comment
On photo Life In Balat in the Cities of the World: Istanbul challenge (9 comments in total)

Beautiful!

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2012 at 07:16 UTC as 1st comment

Wow! The COOLPIX P510 sounds like the perfect travel camera.

If the GPS implementation is better than on the Sony HX100V (which sucks, since it has to lock anew every time the camera is turned on), this will be my new travel camera :)

Link | Posted on Feb 9, 2012 at 00:13 UTC as 2nd comment

No GPS = not interested.

Not for traveling, at least (but why else would I look for a compact supersoom?)

For travel, the Panasonic ZS20 and the Canon PowerShot SX260 HS would be much better bets.

Link | Posted on Feb 8, 2012 at 23:50 UTC as 6th comment

Very interesting. Great improvements to the GPS, which is a must for a travel camera nowadays.

Curious if Canon implements some sort of HDR on these models and if so, how well it works compared to the competition (mainly Panasonic's new DMC-ZS20?

It looks like a good year for travel cameras :)

Link | Posted on Feb 7, 2012 at 09:37 UTC as 12th comment

Wow! Panasonic has the best GPS implementation of any compact zoom manufacturer I know. With the addition of HDR, this camera is hard to beat.

It will be my new travel compact :)

Link | Posted on Feb 4, 2012 at 00:12 UTC as 5th comment
On article Fujifilm reveals HS30EXR 30x CMOS superzoom with Raw (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

Macist: No GPS?!

Seriously, who buys superzooms? People who travel, I'd guess, so they don't have to carry an SLR and lenses.

Without GPS, this fails as a travel camera.

@ Francis Carver: LOL, I can not only name the countries, in many cases I have actually been there. But perhaps you should try naming a few, since you are the one making the assertion?

And you not only missed the joke, but missed my whole point about why super-zooms are the best of all worlds for travel, where a DSLR and the corresponding lenses would be too much to carry.

Perhaps you don't see the need for GPS tagging, but I bet you've never had a camera with that feature. But then you probably used to question the need for digital photography, and never saw any use for email, either....

Even the new version of LR has built-in GPS mapping capability. It's mainstream. A "travel" camera is not for real travel without it. Cheers.

Link | Posted on Jan 16, 2012 at 22:46 UTC
On article Fujifilm reveals HS30EXR 30x CMOS superzoom with Raw (82 comments in total)
In reply to:

Macist: No GPS?!

Seriously, who buys superzooms? People who travel, I'd guess, so they don't have to carry an SLR and lenses.

Without GPS, this fails as a travel camera.

"People that know they can only get the shot from a long distance."

O.K., so perverts, as well as travelers. :)

Francis, you show your age :) Other than possibly North Korea, I can't think of a single country where your camera's GPS would be deemed a "serious crime."

I come back from a trip with usually couple thousand shots, often taken in multiple countries, as well as multiple locations. It is often hard to tell where a shot was taken after a few months.

In addition, many shots are taken in between populated areas, and it is really nice to be able to plot a shot on a map and be able to tell where it was taken.

Virtually all major photo sites offer GPS mapping, so I can only imagine that those who see no need for it have never used a decent GPS camera, or are simply too old to learn.... :)

Anyway, I'd never buy another camera without GPS.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2012 at 03:22 UTC
In reply to:

Macist: "High End?" Without GPS in 2012? For a superzoom?

Don't think so....

Why? Perhaps you never travel?

But if you want the best image quality, why do you want a superzoom? Superzooms are a compromise, but they are the best of all worlds for traveling.

For traveling, a GPS is invaluable, so that those of us who stray away from places like the Eiffel Tower, can remember the locations of our shots.

Link | Posted on Jan 8, 2012 at 03:11 UTC

This looks like the compact travel zoom to beat in 2012. Let's see what else comes in, though.... Oh, and I want it waterproof :)

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2012 at 21:30 UTC as 8th comment
On article Fujifilm reveals HS30EXR 30x CMOS superzoom with Raw (82 comments in total)

No GPS?!

Seriously, who buys superzooms? People who travel, I'd guess, so they don't have to carry an SLR and lenses.

Without GPS, this fails as a travel camera.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2012 at 21:22 UTC as 21st comment | 5 replies

"High End?" Without GPS in 2012? For a superzoom?

Don't think so....

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2012 at 21:20 UTC as 6th comment | 3 replies
On article Canon launches PowerShot SX40 HS 35x CMOS superzoom (160 comments in total)
In reply to:

jcburke: Anybody who needs GPS data for all pictures should just cut back on the drug prescriptions so they can recall where the heck they were when they pressed the shutter. I mean, really, go buy a point-and-shoot camera with GPS instead; the rest of us know where we were and what we shot.
I may make an exception for National Geographic photogs (who wouldn't be buying this camera anyway for other reasons), but otherwise GPS is a crutch for amateurs and has nothing to do with core imagery and creative photography. If it is your discerning feature between two cameras, then you are not a photographer, you're a map freak.

I guess jcburke never leaves his/her little town, so no need for a GPS.

But there is whole world out there and some of us travel, and to places other than the Eiffel Tower or the Statue of Liberty. If you meander across borders, it's hard to be certain where a shot was taken sometimes.

So GPS on a travel camera is a must nowadays.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2011 at 00:37 UTC
On article Fujifilm releases X-S1 premium EXR 26X superzoom (383 comments in total)

Who is the target audience for these superzooms?

I'd guess predominantly travelers, who need a flexible, wide-range zoom in a compact package.

So why would then Fuji not include a GPS function?!

Automatic fail, for many.

Link | Posted on Dec 12, 2011 at 09:00 UTC as 16th comment | 1 reply
On article Leica Announces V-Lux 3 superzoom (131 comments in total)

No GPS.

Not fit for travel camera, nowadays....

Link | Posted on Dec 12, 2011 at 08:45 UTC as 17th comment
On article Just Posted: Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX100V review (72 comments in total)
In reply to:

Macist: I've had this camera for a few months now and it is the perfect travel superzoom, with one glaring exception: the GPS function is very poorly implemented.

Every time the camera is turned off, the GPS turns off as well, which means that it can take a minute or two after the camera is powered for it to be able to lock coordinates and tag the photo.

The delay means that the majority of the photos taken while traveling will not have GPS coordinates.

This is the only reason I would get rid of the camera (or advise someone not to buy it if they intend to use it as a travel camera).

Otherwise, the PQ quality is very decent (for a superzoom) and the versatile zoom range packed in a relatively compact camera, plus the usable viewfinder and HDR, make this one of the top choices for anyone looking for a superzoom.

If SONY can fix he GPS problem with a firmware (give us the option to keep the GPS On, while the camera is Off, like Panasonic does), this would be the best travel camera, period.

With few exceptions, I have found that the camera does well in intelligent auto mode, so I leave it there for 90% of the shots.

But the GPS is necessary for a travel camera, so that I can remember where a particular shot was taken five+ years from now. When one travels, it's basically:

"Wow, this looks good!" -- turn camera on, take a shot or two, turn camera off and keep going. No time for GPS to lock, so the photo is not tagged, and a few years (or even months) later, you start wondering if this was in village A or village B, plus often you have no idea what the name of the place was anyway.

To boot, with GPS tagging you can plot your trip on a map (virtually every online photo service provides this feature), which is actually kind of fun and cool :)

The mode changing delay has been much less of a hindrance for me.

Link | Posted on Oct 24, 2011 at 17:51 UTC
On article Just Posted: Sony Cyber-shot DSC-HX100V review (72 comments in total)

I've had this camera for a few months now and it is the perfect travel superzoom, with one glaring exception: the GPS function is very poorly implemented.

Every time the camera is turned off, the GPS turns off as well, which means that it can take a minute or two after the camera is powered for it to be able to lock coordinates and tag the photo.

The delay means that the majority of the photos taken while traveling will not have GPS coordinates.

This is the only reason I would get rid of the camera (or advise someone not to buy it if they intend to use it as a travel camera).

Otherwise, the PQ quality is very decent (for a superzoom) and the versatile zoom range packed in a relatively compact camera, plus the usable viewfinder and HDR, make this one of the top choices for anyone looking for a superzoom.

If SONY can fix he GPS problem with a firmware (give us the option to keep the GPS On, while the camera is Off, like Panasonic does), this would be the best travel camera, period.

Link | Posted on Oct 23, 2011 at 00:51 UTC as 14th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Tee1up: In terms of size, this is so close to that of a DSLR, one has to wonder why you would want this? The x100, x10 makes sense to me but I don't get this.

For those who travel, this can be a versatile camera without requiring you to lug additional lenses and swap them constantly.

So, if it has a good GPS-tagging implementation, it would be something I can get to replace my Sony HX100v (which has a poor GPS implementation -- GPS has to lock anew every time you turn on the camera -- so it's useless for quick travel shots).

Plus it has a larger sensor, so hopefully there will be less of a watercolor effect at larger magnifications.

Link | Posted on Oct 13, 2011 at 19:17 UTC

I hope it has usable GPS tagging.

Link | Posted on Oct 5, 2011 at 22:23 UTC as 47th comment
On article Canon launches PowerShot SX40 HS 35x CMOS superzoom (160 comments in total)
In reply to:

Macist: Without GPS, this does not even merit a second look.

Super-zooms are cameras for travel. Nowadays, virtually every photo software and storage site incorporates GPS functionality, so that the user can find out exactly where the photo was taken.

So, without GPS, this super-zoom fails as a travel camera.

Too bad.

cont.

GPS has changed all this. Now I can plot my shots on Google Earth, or on any of the other map services offered by virtually all of the major photo sites.

For instance, I went through Micronesia over Christmas. Canoeing around small islands the names of which I never knew, I took a ton of shots of locations that I would never know how to find on a map. Same for meandering around islands and going through villages the names of which were then unknown to me.

With the photos tagged with GPS coordinates, I can zoom in on the exact location in Google Earth, and actually find out where I've been :)

As to the phone thing, it is absurd to think that I would try to tag 2000 with it, and then enter the coordinates manually into LightRoom.

Link | Posted on Sep 30, 2011 at 18:24 UTC
Total: 46, showing: 21 – 40
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