Michael J Davis

Michael J Davis

Lives in United Kingdom Rochdale, United Kingdom
Works as a Retired
Has a website at www.trustsof.co.uk
Joined on Mar 28, 2007

Comments

Total: 103, showing: 21 – 40
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In reply to:

Atcliffe: Why don’t the authorities simply ban photography there? It’s not that uncommon in some galleries, cathedrals, Hindu temples in India etc. There will always be some fool who will try to sneak a photo but in general the problem would be solved.

I have to say that my memories of Auschwitz / Birkenau are enhanced and renewed by the photos I took (I hope respectfully) there 8 years ago.

But then I was aware that even the dust in the air might be somebody's ashes.

Link | Posted on Mar 25, 2019 at 12:24 UTC
In reply to:

pseudobreccia: Did they really need to do a study to determine this...it is an obvious conclusion!

Of course it was! The people who assessed the photos had a point to prove! :-)

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2019 at 13:27 UTC

Cool - and, no doubt, a load of fun!

But 10,000 years old! How old do you think the elements are in my ceramic lens?
(That's elements as in chemical, rather than 'elements' as in lens.)

;-)

Link | Posted on Oct 24, 2018 at 10:48 UTC as 29th comment

Well, I've felt like killing the person who sticks a phone up in front of my carefully composed view as I'm about to press the shutter! :-(

Apart from that the number of places now declared 'photography-free zones' after all the selfies that distract visitors and others sensitive to the environment. (Think art galleries, churches, performances, etc.)

But the big question is - "Did they get the shot?" Was that answered in the research?

Link | Posted on Oct 6, 2018 at 11:48 UTC as 31st comment
In reply to:

Michael J Davis: The summary article misses the most important point in the success story:-
The format was not restricted to one manufacturer, so that users could be assured that the standards could be kept high, while the prices were competitive.

After 35 years as a Leica photographer*, who'd simplified to go digital, that was the only reason that I changed to a decent ILC system, getting the G1 + kit lenses and the promise of a 20mm f1.7 'coming shortly. (Which it did!)

* SLRs were always too noisy for my (amateur) candid and event work.

I'm still very happy with all my cameras and lenses in this system.

Sorry - could be clearer - I mean the system specs - the lens interface and digital interface between lenses and bodies. So with two manufacturers meeting the same technical specs we have more choice and more competition.

Link | Posted on Aug 12, 2018 at 15:47 UTC

The summary article misses the most important point in the success story:-
The format was not restricted to one manufacturer, so that users could be assured that the standards could be kept high, while the prices were competitive.

After 35 years as a Leica photographer*, who'd simplified to go digital, that was the only reason that I changed to a decent ILC system, getting the G1 + kit lenses and the promise of a 20mm f1.7 'coming shortly. (Which it did!)

* SLRs were always too noisy for my (amateur) candid and event work.

I'm still very happy with all my cameras and lenses in this system.

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2018 at 16:01 UTC as 150th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

lattesweden: Interesting timing, I fired up my Panasonic G1 earlier today and took some test shots with it to see that all is okey, before going out with it in an hour to shot some nature. I plan on shooting with it the following two months to celebrate the 10 years anniversary. I just now checked in here and found this nice article, but it feels like you did forget a slide about Sonys importance in the history lifting mirrorless to the level it has today with their FF series.

Last week I needed my camera - so grabbed my G1 that I keep there 'for emergencies'! I'm glad to say that the quality was as good as ever.

Link | Posted on Aug 11, 2018 at 15:53 UTC

At first I was misled by the before / after images; assuming that the white areas had been completed by the program in one step.

Looking at the video shows that there's quite a lot of skill in choosing which items to modify and in which order. eg, One eye is adjusted and then the other, so the program is doing copy/adjust on each. The library shot 'rebuilds' the room step by step. In practice that's not a lot different from what I might to in photoshop - tho' quicker than I would.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2018 at 10:03 UTC as 27th comment

I've had a paid for account with Flickr for 12+ years. Apart from infuriating technical issues (poor maintenance changes) it#s worked for me as a place to share photos of events and my preferences.
I hope my 5000+ images continue to be available on the web and I don't have to pay more until my current sub expires.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2018 at 18:28 UTC as 48th comment
In reply to:

entoman: I must be a good photographer because I think all my photos are awful!

The only difference between a good photographer and a bad one, is that the good photographer doesn't show his/her bad shots!

Perhaps we should reword that to "... the good photographer knows which are her/his bad shots"!

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2018 at 14:35 UTC

And what is the value of photo-related imports from China (direct or indirect) and is your President likely to add import taxes? Will that increase or decrease the effect on GDP?

Link | Posted on Mar 23, 2018 at 11:27 UTC as 6th comment

Good points! As a kid, new to photography in the '50s, I'd go out in the countryside for a walk. Stop at random and then say to myself "Find the photo!" This meant that I had to look forward, sideways, back, up, down at different camera heights until I found the best composition and interesting shot available. Take it and walk on.
Obviously, if I saw something worth photographing, I'd stop - but the discipline that I'd applied at the other times meant that I'd look for the best view. That cost me money, film was expensive to a schoolboy - now digital's free!

Link | Posted on Feb 7, 2018 at 11:39 UTC as 10th comment

When I've got all my lenses well protected, how can I tell which is which? :-(

Link | Posted on Dec 19, 2017 at 11:35 UTC as 25th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Michael J Davis: 50 years ago at Business School I recall a case study on the launch of Polaroid consumer cameras. The obvious conclusion was that, had they aimed at specialist industrial uses where a premium would be paid for 'instant images', they would have developed a stronger and more profitable base prior to looking at the consumer market.

That all came back to me when I read of Lytro's 'launch' of a consumer camera. I think the same lessons apply.

To clarify - the case study related to the start up of Polaroid - just after the War - in the 1940's - it was expensive and took a few years to achieve the success it did. You know the story, it was Dr Land's daughter who said, when he took a photo of her - "I wan't to see it now!"

The Lytro message was more like "I want to focus it later!" ;-)

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2017 at 17:42 UTC

50 years ago at Business School I recall a case study on the launch of Polaroid consumer cameras. The obvious conclusion was that, had they aimed at specialist industrial uses where a premium would be paid for 'instant images', they would have developed a stronger and more profitable base prior to looking at the consumer market.

That all came back to me when I read of Lytro's 'launch' of a consumer camera. I think the same lessons apply.

Link | Posted on Dec 6, 2017 at 13:11 UTC as 10th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

BobYIL: Next year comes out the M39 screw-mount version of it to celebrate the 51st anniversary of the LHSA for not less than $11.595; for it will be collapsible like the first Summicron...

My collapsible version (1959) was the bayonet fit. ISTM that the collapsible version would be useful - it certainly was on my M3!

Link | Posted on Dec 1, 2017 at 11:48 UTC
On article First samples: Leica Thambar-M 90mm F2.2 (222 comments in total)

Although I never owned one of the originals, I'm pretty familiar with work using the original from the 50's & 60's. What I recall was much smoother transitions and some sharp areas, which I tried to emulate (with some success) using a filter with a vaseline smear around the outside.

What I assume comes from using the 'centre disk' are those hard bokeh rings. I never recall seeing that effect - which nullifies the concept of this lens IMHO - on any of the original photos.

I can understand the scepticism, but 'soft focus effect' is somewhat dated these days! Still I sold all my Leica gear in 1999!
M

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2017 at 11:46 UTC as 51st comment

Interesting, but difficult to tell which is best! Was the varying colour of her shirt/blouse due to light, lenses or what?

Link | Posted on Sep 26, 2017 at 16:32 UTC as 34th comment

I received that disappointing message yesterday, and will be replying to Tim. I first came across it around issue 7, and have looked forward to it each month. The photography used is superb.

However, it has seemed rather NZ-orientated and the ads were of a fairly limited range. And, frankly, never influenced me! :-( And that, I think, has to be the key problem - become world-wide - even if the content remains predominantly antipodean.

As I've always read it on my 24" monitor to see the pics, I can't comment about platforms, But I would certainly be happy with a GBP10 / $10 / Eur10 annual subscription just to see the excellent pics and articles.

Link | Posted on Aug 15, 2017 at 11:01 UTC as 11th comment | 1 reply

No one has queried what they did between 1917 to 1948 - something they don't wish to celebrate, perhaps?

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2017 at 11:59 UTC as 40th comment | 1 reply
Total: 103, showing: 21 – 40
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