DtEW

Joined on Feb 17, 2012
About me:

Amateur photographer primarily shooting in adventure and urban exploration contexts.

Comments

Total: 122, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Sid911: My Favorites?
1. Canon 24-70 f2.8 Version II - Still the best! I tested against Sony 24-70 GM lens and I still like Canon version.
2. Canon 70-200 f2.8 Version II - stunning stunning lens! I wouldnt dare to touch Sony's 70-200 f2.8 simply because I can adapt this lens and is SUPER!
3. Canon 100-400 L Version II - Canon is Master of zooms, second to none!
4. Canon 11-24 L - Canon's Engineering prowess at its pinnacle!
5. Canon 16-35 f4 - A lens so good, it will make you think multiple times to buy the f.28 III version!

I think Sid911 actually uses a Canon body, panther fan.

Edit: Nevermind, I see that he frequents the FE forum as well.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 18:55 UTC
In reply to:

Sid911: My Favorites?
1. Canon 24-70 f2.8 Version II - Still the best! I tested against Sony 24-70 GM lens and I still like Canon version.
2. Canon 70-200 f2.8 Version II - stunning stunning lens! I wouldnt dare to touch Sony's 70-200 f2.8 simply because I can adapt this lens and is SUPER!
3. Canon 100-400 L Version II - Canon is Master of zooms, second to none!
4. Canon 11-24 L - Canon's Engineering prowess at its pinnacle!
5. Canon 16-35 f4 - A lens so good, it will make you think multiple times to buy the f.28 III version!

"I agree with you on most of the lenses. But the Sony 24-70 and the Canon are indistinguishable."

Uh... one is bigger, is currently 25% more-expensive than the other, and can't be used on a Canon body. I think that's pretty easy to distinguish.

Do you mean the IQ of the lenses are indistinguishable from each other?

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 18:34 UTC
In reply to:

MikeFairbanks: I love this kind of article. The behind-the-scenes human stories are cool.

I'm surprised none of them picked any prime lenses.

Harzarding a guess, prime lenses might be too "easy", maybe primarily constrained by cost (read: what the market is willing to bear), as there are brute-force ways of solving the problem. See Otuses.

Zoom lenses are necessarily a compromise through the focal lengths, and might represent a greater engineering and creative challenge that the creators might have stronger impressions for if/when they succeed.

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2017 at 17:31 UTC

Isn't there a Federal hiring freeze in-effect with exceptions only being made for the (admittedly broadly-worded) purpose of "public safety"?

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2017 at 22:22 UTC as 17th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

DavidsfotosDotCom: Deport the person if possible, english fluency should be required for citizenship for 95% unless they have a PhD, millions or some other compelling skill contribution.
I now understand why the french speaking Quebecers in Canada are fighting to preserve their culture from invaders. At least this time some real damage & stupidity occurred unlike the pedestrians walking @ Yellowstone.

The great thing about the Trump administration is that we now know clearly who the xenophobes among us are, and those who are okay with f*cking up the lives of other human beings just so they themselves can feel better.

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2017 at 17:56 UTC
In reply to:

landscaper1: $5,000 and 6 months. Hardly seems sufficient punishment.

Karroly, if the moon was a popularly-enjoyed area that is legally-protected and heavily-signed against specific types of damaging usage, which was then directly violated... then you might have some semblance of a point.

Context matters. It's the difference between burning your pile of trash vs. burning a public national treasure. Between smashing a watermelon vs. a skull with a hammer. The actual physical act is similar, everything else is totally different. Don't pretend you don't understand this.

Link | Posted on Mar 15, 2017 at 18:06 UTC
In reply to:

Sirandar: You have to wonder what this article has to do with photography.
There is some implication that a photographer did this.

It is incredibly unlikely that this van was left there by anybody who would call themselves a photographer.

If we had real news instead of fake news we would know if the van even had plates (probably not) and if the VIN number was traced, or even if the van was reported stolen. In Canada, out of province people routinely buy old junker vans to travel the west coast to save $$. When they no longer work they are abandoned.

Because being an actual reporter is no longer a viable occupation, there is nobody to "report" these little details.

I think Sirander is just clueless as to:

1) Where Death Valley is (hence the absurdity of abandoning any vehicle for simple inconvenience), and...
2) The popularity, and hence importance, of Death Valley features among landscape photographers.

Also:

3) He probably owns a ratty van he's going to abandon somewhere real soon.

Link | Posted on Mar 15, 2017 at 17:44 UTC

If it was already going to be *that* big, and provisions were going to be made for attaching it to the bottom of the camera... why didn't they just add a couple of ergonomic bits and make it into a vertical grip, esp. when this accessory precludes the use of the normal vertical grip?

Link | Posted on Mar 7, 2017 at 18:41 UTC as 21st comment
In reply to:

Kevin DiOssi: Very underwhelming performance in regards to fringe and cloudy corners by rendering details with ghosting.

Also, for all you "Anti Aliasing Filters aren't necessary" you couldn't be more wrong. Several of these shots are just ruined by aliasing. look at those patterns in the grate in Image 10. I would be very mad if I came home with images like that!!

Oh gosh. That aliasing/moire is something fierce. Or maybe they painted those things in rainbows for the gaiety? ;)

In all seriousness and back to the topic-at-hand (the Sigma 14mm Art), it's a good sign for its ability to resolve. Too bad they're not expending the same amount of effort for coma control.

Link | Posted on Mar 2, 2017 at 21:11 UTC
In reply to:

DtEW: Honestly, sometimes Sigma does these "stunt" lenses just to do something unprecedented and tickle the imagination of the photography gearhead-set.

Sometimes they shine, sometimes they have minor caveats, and sometimes major ones.

It seems that with the amount of coma they can't seem to keep out of their ultra-fast UWAs, these lenses are actually more niche than the already-niche wide-field astro application that people keep hoping Sigma can work some magic with.

Do these seem to be reasonable UWA primes? Sure. Are they ultra-fast, faster than anything before? Sure. Can you run them wide-open? Sure, there's probably enough DoF at this short FL for reasonable usage. Can you run them wide-open at night at point light sources like everyone wants to? Well...

Honestly, I think people would have been more pleased had this just been a coma-free 14mm f/2-something at Sigma's Global Vision build quality.

Poul Jenson: "Coma-free UWA f/2.x lenses do not exist..." You are asserting easily-disprovable things again. The Samyang UWA offerings (specifically the 14mm and 20mm) are well-known among wide-field astrophotographers for their absence of comatic aberration. Of course, the trade-off is 1) hit-or-miss quality control, and 2) prior-generation resolving power. The Tamron SP 15-30mm f/2.8 and the new Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L III USM are nearly coma-free. The latter was (blatantly) introduced with a full-resolution Milky Way shot as part of its marketing to hammer this fact home. But that's it as to the known choices. Samyang and Irix both have f/2.4 versions of 14-15mm lenses on the horizon. The former is too early for reviews, and the latter looks to be a dud for comatic aberration.

I mean, I could also point out where lens reviews *do* include coma tests, but I grow tired of this full education I'm forced to impart to you. I don't think you have many well-founded points.

Link | Posted on Mar 2, 2017 at 00:15 UTC
In reply to:

DtEW: Honestly, sometimes Sigma does these "stunt" lenses just to do something unprecedented and tickle the imagination of the photography gearhead-set.

Sometimes they shine, sometimes they have minor caveats, and sometimes major ones.

It seems that with the amount of coma they can't seem to keep out of their ultra-fast UWAs, these lenses are actually more niche than the already-niche wide-field astro application that people keep hoping Sigma can work some magic with.

Do these seem to be reasonable UWA primes? Sure. Are they ultra-fast, faster than anything before? Sure. Can you run them wide-open? Sure, there's probably enough DoF at this short FL for reasonable usage. Can you run them wide-open at night at point light sources like everyone wants to? Well...

Honestly, I think people would have been more pleased had this just been a coma-free 14mm f/2-something at Sigma's Global Vision build quality.

Poul Jenson: "but you already have numerous choices for wide, high quality f/2-something lenses". You forgot about the most important factor: an absence of coma. Help name me those "numerous choices" you insist are there.

Link | Posted on Mar 1, 2017 at 18:12 UTC

Honestly, sometimes Sigma does these "stunt" lenses just to do something unprecedented and tickle the imagination of the photography gearhead-set.

Sometimes they shine, sometimes they have minor caveats, and sometimes major ones.

It seems that with the amount of coma they can't seem to keep out of their ultra-fast UWAs, these lenses are actually more niche than the already-niche wide-field astro application that people keep hoping Sigma can work some magic with.

Do these seem to be reasonable UWA primes? Sure. Are they ultra-fast, faster than anything before? Sure. Can you run them wide-open? Sure, there's probably enough DoF at this short FL for reasonable usage. Can you run them wide-open at night at point light sources like everyone wants to? Well...

Honestly, I think people would have been more pleased had this just been a coma-free 14mm f/2-something at Sigma's Global Vision build quality.

Link | Posted on Mar 1, 2017 at 01:17 UTC as 34th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

Steve Balcombe: Very, very impressive.

Sadly the smeary effect around the brightest screws near the right-hand edge of image 4 is very reminiscent of coma. Hope I'm wrong.

Coma coma coma coma coma chameleon...

http://www.freakingnews.com/pictures/29000/Chameleon-with-Wings-29417.jpg

Link | Posted on Feb 28, 2017 at 16:47 UTC
On article CP+ 2017: Hands-on with Sigma's newest lenses (198 comments in total)
In reply to:

AbrasiveReducer: I hope that's a child's hand, holding those lenses.

They soaked that child in a bathtub for 2 hours before they made him come out and play hand model.

Link | Posted on Feb 23, 2017 at 22:01 UTC
On article Sigma 85mm F1.4 Art DxO results: a new king is crowned (249 comments in total)
In reply to:

jango: I assumes it will gain even higher score with the canon 5ds r high 50 mpical

Look carefully at the DXO results list in the middle of this page:

http://www.thephoblographer.com/2017/02/02/sigma-85mm-f1-4-beats-zeiss-otus-dxo-tests/

It shows the (yet-unpublished) results of the the new Sigma 85mm A on the 5DSR. As expected, it achieves better resolution numbers (40mpix) than the D810. Surprisingly, it also achieves significantly better numbers (-0.5) in the vignetting metric. The transmission metric is marginally lower (1.8).

(Un)surprisingly, DXOMark black-box combined score gives it a lower total score (48) than the Nikon version.

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2017 at 18:42 UTC
In reply to:

DtEW: It seems like that given the rapid pace of technological improvement in the cellphone arena, Vertu should have started with high-end-specs in the first place so that their phones could remain as current for as long as possible.

Better yet, they should just sell their service as a subscription so that every few years, the phone gets sent in for a technological refurbishment. Figure it into the price. People who opt for these things aren't interested in the nickle-and-dime, but they would get miffed if they weren't able to see/say that they're using "the best". The market for a jewel-encrusted phone with a concierge service is one of ego and convenience.

fusoexplorer: Don't see too many maids driving hand-me-down Jaguars around here, in what is likely one of the wealthiest areas of the country (SFBay Area).

Noveau riche (and that's who the Vertu is for; old money don't throw away money into steeply-depreciating assets, much less tastelessly flashy ones) care greatly about establishing and maintaining their recently-acquired (and psychologically insecure) step-up in the class heirarchy. If the maid comes in with an entry-level Jaguar for whatever reason, Jaguars will suddenly become old-hat to them... or the maid will just feel *wrong* and no longer welcome.

Trust me. I've seen Vertus and the people that use them. There's a reason why their boutiques are located in LA, NYC, and *Vegas*.

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2017 at 23:08 UTC

It seems like that given the rapid pace of technological improvement in the cellphone arena, Vertu should have started with high-end-specs in the first place so that their phones could remain as current for as long as possible.

Better yet, they should just sell their service as a subscription so that every few years, the phone gets sent in for a technological refurbishment. Figure it into the price. People who opt for these things aren't interested in the nickle-and-dime, but they would get miffed if they weren't able to see/say that they're using "the best". The market for a jewel-encrusted phone with a concierge service is one of ego and convenience.

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2017 at 19:44 UTC as 30th comment | 3 replies

Oh look, a stylist wanted a mini Marvel Helicarrier...

(I don't think he's taken a serious look at a real drone to understand how much rotor area is par for conventional (read: real & available) technology. Unless his mini Helicarrier is made of styrofoam, which would be just great in a gust of wind. And I sure like car roof panels made out of styrofoam.)

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2017 at 18:00 UTC as 18th comment
On article Our favorite gear, rewarded: DPReview Awards 2016 (270 comments in total)
In reply to:

TN Args: Part 1 of 2

Congrats to Nikon and to the D500 for the overall award. It clearly impresses many and tempts many more again. There are two major reasons why it is a poor choice.

1. If you put aside its one trick, accurate action autofocus, you suddenly have a *very* ordinary camera: lowish resolution, over a stop more noise than similarly priced FF options, cumbersome brick of a body, no long lenses especially designed for its sensor format, missing an EVF (and let's face it, the arguments for an OVF look puerile these days when the best EVFs effectively avoid blackout and can be used in conjunction with a red dot finder for superb target tracking), generally lacking innovation, and a burst speed that, by the end of the year, was decidedly short of the top tier.

Thanks for the laugh!

I do not own (nor care to own )a crop Nikon, but these posts take the cake for aggressive, self-unaware rationalization for one's equipment preferences. Bravo. You are now the gold standard.

Link | Posted on Dec 27, 2016 at 01:54 UTC
In reply to:

techjedi: With great respect, the photographer helped the assassin glamourize the murder and this photo will serve as a recruiting tool for terrorist groups. How exactly does this serve as an encouragement for pro photography? It is a great picture, but I am fairly sure the civilized world would have been no less off without it.

(cont.)

By your illogic/slur, anything that somebody can take and consume as a perversion is therefore ethically questionable regardless of the intent of creation. By that same illogic/slur, you are necessarily arguing that if *somebody* finds something erotic about your family portrait... you, as a photographer, did something ethically questionable, despite your intentions.

It's total nonsense.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2016 at 19:24 UTC
Total: 122, showing: 1 – 20
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