DtEW

Joined on Feb 17, 2012
About me:

Amateur photographer primarily shooting in adventure and urban exploration contexts.

Comments

Total: 146, showing: 1 – 20
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It's all fun and games until you record grandpa's disembodied soul stuck in limbo (i.e. the garage).

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2017 at 00:12 UTC as 30th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Sactojim: So it appears DPR is now a branch of the Huffington Post? What's with you guys and your need to throw politics into this site??

*redacted*

Link | Posted on Jun 9, 2017 at 23:12 UTC
In reply to:

ttran88: The shutter noise from them cameras are obnoxious.

They're so loud you heard them through the static images, eh?

Link | Posted on Jun 9, 2017 at 21:43 UTC
In reply to:

Tower: Please do not judge a book by its cover.

We're not supposed to judge a lens by the output it creates?

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2017 at 22:58 UTC

More like fussy bokeh that demands your attention... and if you fight the urge, look away, and tune it out... make you feel like you're on meds.

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2017 at 22:37 UTC as 29th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

alandalsong: Someone please enlighten me on this statement "it's signature creamy bokeh not only in the background but also in the front".

OOF areas can exist in front of the chosen subject.

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2017 at 22:19 UTC

I do have to admit that at first glance, I thought the guy modified a hand truck. :P

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2017 at 20:17 UTC as 94th comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Impulses: 4 hours free climbing sheer rock... And they say he did it in good time? That takes some serious balls.

What Honnold did took prodigious innate talent, a lifetime of training, intense preparation for this specific feat, and more than a little bit of luck.

I say this not to argue that it didn't take "serious balls"... but to reinforce the fact that "serious balls" was perhaps only 5% of the equation, if even that.

Link | Posted on Jun 5, 2017 at 23:45 UTC

Not as dramatic as some of the on-wall photography (esp. that killer shot from Jimmy Chin), but a very interesting sportscaster-type summary of the play-by-play of an incredible feat.

Link | Posted on Jun 5, 2017 at 23:40 UTC as 11th comment
On article Nikon launches Arcrest protection filter line (17 comments in total)
In reply to:

DtEW: They look like re-badged Hoya HDs.

(Which are excellent filters.)

Martini=Marumi. Didn't catch the phone's auto-correct's auto-mangle in time.

Link | Posted on Jun 5, 2017 at 18:10 UTC
On article Nikon launches Arcrest protection filter line (17 comments in total)
In reply to:

DtEW: They look like re-badged Hoya HDs.

(Which are excellent filters.)

Way to miss the point, GEONYC.

What I'm saying is that it is obviously made in Japan, and contracted from an existing filter maker.

There are only two filter factories in Japan: Marumi (in Nagano), and Kenko Tokina (in Osaka).

It looks like a Hoya (AKA Kenko). It doesn't look like a Martini. It's made in Japan.

Gee, I wonder who makes this? ;)

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2017 at 15:14 UTC
On article Nikon launches Arcrest protection filter line (17 comments in total)
In reply to:

DtEW: They look like re-badged Hoya HDs.

(Which are excellent filters.)

...And the frame/knurling.

And the fact that Hoya HDs (and the Sigma Ceramics, which I suspect are also Hoya-sourced given both Sigma's glass-blank relationship with Hoya, and that their non-ceramic models also look like oversized Hoya HDs) are the only filters on the market that are marketed as impact-resistant.

And made in Japan.

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2017 at 19:18 UTC
On article Nikon launches Arcrest protection filter line (17 comments in total)

They look like re-badged Hoya HDs.

(Which are excellent filters.)

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2017 at 17:55 UTC as 9th comment | 6 replies

"Hard disk manufacturer Western Digital acquired SSD specialist SanDisk last year."

You mean NAND flash memory specialist. Because last I remember SanDisk memory cards were a major part of their business as well.

Link | Posted on Jun 1, 2017 at 18:34 UTC as 5th comment
In reply to:

aris14: I think that the design of something new from a blank sheet of paper is far more expensive for manufacturers with a long history and consequently culture. In some cases suggests an obsession more or less...
Either way this is not a welcomed cost .

(continued)

Eventually, Sony took notice and began to explore (slowly, tentatively) growing it into a real system, while committing plenty of mis-steps (some argue still to this very day, see stop-down focusing, reduced bit-depth shooting modes, star-eater algorithm, etc.) and half-baked hardware (eg. NEX-7 pixel shading, camera overheating in several models) that gave a lot of early users the impression that they were effectively beta-testing with their money. Hell, it took *years* for Sony to abandon their 6 icon-based menu system with a potpourri of disparate options tossed in each that was hated by everyone.

Sony didn't go all-in as any sort of desperate Hail-Mary with all their heart and resources. It was basically a Nikon-1-like whim that turned out better than expected, and they slowly felt-it-out while turning it into something else.

So the argument that Sony went blank-slate carries little weight in regard to what Canon and Nikon needs to do for their mainstay systems.

Link | Posted on May 24, 2017 at 17:47 UTC
In reply to:

aris14: I think that the design of something new from a blank sheet of paper is far more expensive for manufacturers with a long history and consequently culture. In some cases suggests an obsession more or less...
Either way this is not a welcomed cost .

Sony didn't bite anything. People who say that have little idea what the E-mount was in its infancy.

Sony started the E-mount in the NEX as a toy for women (read that with the appropriate East Asian cultural patriarchy) who were intimidated by real-sized cameras and their seeming complexity... and dilettantes. Yes, that was their explicit marketing. The bodies were introduced in a couple color options (to accessorize with your personality), few functional accessories, and more-importantly... only about 5 lackluster lenses. Particularly telling from those lens options, there was: 1) a 18-200mm superzoom with top billing, 2) a 30mm macro lens intended for food photography, 3) that coverage of UWA FLs was achieved by an over-the-front converter in front of a pancake lens. Again, it was a toy system.

Contrary to their intentions, enthusiasts started adapting legacy lenses by virtue of it being the shortest flange distance with the largest sensor.

(continued)

Link | Posted on May 24, 2017 at 17:42 UTC
In reply to:

DtEW: I find the major point of this article strange, given that we are already seeing Canon's Dual-Pixel Autofocus (DPAF, introduced in 2015) drive USM & other ultrasonic ring motor-type lenses almost as well as the PDAF chip of the original EOS spec in refinement since 1987.

I also find it curious that no discussion was attempted about the telecentricity/pixel-shading issue that plagued early short-flange-mount cameras/lenses, later "solved" by very-telecentric, bigger-than-dSLR-type lenses for some MILC systems.

In reality, Canon's "legacy" isn't very restrictive at all, which makes a decision to support it (if it is that) more than understandable.

If you consider that Sony did not initially envision the E-mount as for serious photographers (recall the NEX and its marketing)... keeping the same flange distance for the FE-mount (thus potentially sharpening incident light angles on the sensor) is itself a bow to the mount's "legacy" instead of striving for an "optimal" design.

Mr Low Notes - indeed, I stand corrected. But I think you would agree that my point remains unaltered.

Link | Posted on May 23, 2017 at 20:14 UTC

I find the major point of this article strange, given that we are already seeing Canon's Dual-Pixel Autofocus (DPAF, introduced in 2015) drive USM & other ultrasonic ring motor-type lenses almost as well as the PDAF chip of the original EOS spec in refinement since 1987.

I also find it curious that no discussion was attempted about the telecentricity/pixel-shading issue that plagued early short-flange-mount cameras/lenses, later "solved" by very-telecentric, bigger-than-dSLR-type lenses for some MILC systems.

In reality, Canon's "legacy" isn't very restrictive at all, which makes a decision to support it (if it is that) more than understandable.

If you consider that Sony did not initially envision the E-mount as for serious photographers (recall the NEX and its marketing)... keeping the same flange distance for the FE-mount (thus potentially sharpening incident light angles on the sensor) is itself a bow to the mount's "legacy" instead of striving for an "optimal" design.

Link | Posted on May 23, 2017 at 18:17 UTC as 81st comment | 4 replies
On article Polaroid sold to new owner (94 comments in total)

He wants to put the "Pol-" back in Polaroid?

(I don't suggest trying to put the "-aroid" back in Polarioid. Or maybe he already did.)

Link | Posted on May 15, 2017 at 21:12 UTC as 3rd comment
On article A mother shares her love of adventure with her son (3 comments in total)
In reply to:

FLruckas: Nice pictures.

It's good to see people doing generous things for others.....

There should be more of...

This kind of thing...

In the news...

But where are....

The...

Fr*iggin...

Helmets...

????

Maybe there's some....

Unknown...

Reason why....

They're not....

Needed...

Your sentiment is seconded, but the explanation is easy (if not entirely satisfying).

Nothing they are doing requires a helmet. (Huh?)

They are not actually rock climbing/abseiling/anything. You can see by their rope setup. They were lowered/raised onto the face of a cliff (probably a short one) by others. They might have been wearing a helmet during that procedure, or the cliff is so cleaned and controlled that loose rocks aren't an issue. Helmets were probably deemed to distract from the faces of the subjects, so they were not used/removed for the shoot itself.

Of course, the shot itself (esp. taken with the set) is sold as fanciful fiction. But as you are expressing, it is a bit problematic when taken by itself without context.

What is *really* disturbing is that the kid isn't directly tied-in to the figure-eight knot, but is instead connected by what seems to be a half-turn twist-lock 'biner. I would not trust a child with one of those.

Link | Posted on May 15, 2017 at 17:35 UTC
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