calson

Lives in United States Elkhorn, United States
Works as a photographer
Joined on Nov 14, 2005

Comments

Total: 32, showing: 1 – 20
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On article RIP Lightroom 6: Death by subscription model (1630 comments in total)

Great for further increasing Adobe's profits which is the entire reason behind the move to have all their applications on a Web server and charging a monthly fee to rent access. Not great for users, in particular those living in areas without broadband internet access or who travel to locations where there is not broadband internet access.

Lightroom is still based on a single user with a single computer and as such it is of no use to those who have multiple users or who use multiple computers to access files on a NAS.

Fortunately there are plenty of options for both image editing and for file management.

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2017 at 00:33 UTC as 482nd comment | 1 reply

Canon shooters have complained about the relatively poor autofocus performance with the 5DS R camera and suspect that it is related to the smaller pixels which make contrast detection more difficult for the autofocus system.

The sports oriented video showing better capture rate with the D5 is also irrelevant for many shooters. With wildlife I do not choose to photograph a bear, elk, etc. charging in my direction. More often I am photographing birds that are 1/10 the size or smaller than a human and in this setting the D850 while very good is not as good as the D500.

I read the same hype about greatly improved autofocus when the D750 was released and I bought one as a result. I quickly found that it was no better than my D7200 in most shooting situations and that I had wasted my money.

Link | Posted on Sep 29, 2017 at 18:39 UTC as 56th comment | 3 replies
On article Nikon D850 Review (2116 comments in total)

Not a proper test. If there is noise at ISO 64 when the EV is adjusted in processing then the image was underexposed. Nikon DSLRs since the D3 (2007) have produced better image files from overexposure than underexposure. Recognition of this is why the advice has been to expose to the right on the histogram.

Take any camera and underexpose by 1EV and then overexpose by 1EV and the overexposures will nearly always produce the better image after converting the RAW file. With an underexposure there is less real data in the file and so adjusting the EV after the exposure will of course increase the visible noise in the file.

The D850 is evidently more forgiving of a bad exposure made by its user. Nikon with the D3 and subsequent cameras designed them to be more forgiving of overexposed elements in a scene (less data lost) as when photographing a bride in her white dress in full sunlight and not blowing out her dress.

Link | Posted on Sep 11, 2017 at 18:36 UTC as 283rd comment | 3 replies
On photo Muddus in the Wide open vistas challenge (8 comments in total)

illustrates very aptly how it is most important to be at a place at the right time and with the right conditions and have the ability to compose and capture the scene. Masterful job overall.

Shows also how a dark stormy day often makes for the best photography.

Link | Posted on Sep 7, 2017 at 23:12 UTC as 1st comment

This is important in the western USA or anywhere there are hills which block the line of sight 4G signals from a cell tower. The DJI internet connectivity has required a smartphone with a 4G connection to the internet. 3G or 1xRTT is not enough to connect to the DJI web servers successfully.

This has everything to do with not being restricted to those areas where there is a 4G cell signal available than with the military issue as after all the army is not buying DJI Phantom drones in quantity but rather drones that can carry weapons and kill people. DJI drones, even the commercial models, are hardly military grade in terms of the reliability of the operating code.

The DJI drones are remarkable for the price but one is not getting a reliable or particularly durable aircraft which is why DJI has the $149 Care program to fix a damaged aircraft during its first year of use by a customer.

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2017 at 18:44 UTC as 5th comment

This is a terrible approach. With product photography it is important to get the results needed but equally important to do so with minimal time spent with post processing of image files.

Two products that I have found invaluable are the Cocoon translucent light tents and small rolls of seamless material. Both make it cheap and easy to avoid corners or wrinkles in shots and take up very little space when being stored.

These also make it easy to take a table or a table frame or glass table top and light from all directions to get the effect needed even with complex products and those with very reflective surfaces.

Cheap flash units make it easy to have many lights that are easy to position even for very small items and light them to best effect from any side or from above or from below (with the Cocoon on a frame or piece of glass).

Link | Posted on Aug 16, 2017 at 18:37 UTC as 4th comment

And someday it will be available to buy one. No inventory or ETA for it at B&H.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2017 at 23:23 UTC as 2nd comment

Most likely it is non-encryption of the live feed so others in the vicinity would be able to see first person view what the military is doing. It really calls into question what the military is doing with the DJI drones and not DJI as such.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2017 at 23:21 UTC as 28th comment

The TG-5 lacks Shutter Priority mode which I need with a P&S to insure sharp pictures in many circumstances. Using a Sport mode gives all the control to the camera and its programming and takes it away from the shooter.

Link | Posted on Jul 9, 2017 at 01:25 UTC as 24th comment

What 99.9% of people do not realize is that the billboards along the highway are printed usually at 110dpi and the great distance to the viewer tricks the eye much as with a newspaper when viewed closer than arms' length.

The good aspect is that any camera including a smartphone is better than not having a camera at all. Digital cameras and no worries about film deteriorating has made it possible to take more photos though unfortunately the majority are done with little or no thought, much like tweets by our "president".

Link | Posted on Jul 4, 2017 at 16:41 UTC as 9th comment

I may take 400 still images and of these maybe 1 of these becomes a print. The rest still needed to be captured and transferred and stored and backed up to a NAS. With 8K video it would be more like 16,000 to 1 in terms of images that become a print. This is an excellent example of where more is less.

And the problem it creates in having more images to review is not trivial at a time when there still does not exist a viable image search engine and instead one has to rely on meta tagging and relatively crude DAM applications or even worse, the library structure of Lightroom or CaptureOne.

Link | Posted on Jun 20, 2017 at 18:36 UTC as 25th comment | 1 reply
On article Nikon D7500 vs Canon EOS 80D (251 comments in total)

When determining how high an ISO setting is usable I do a test with tungsten lighting and a dark skinned subject and preferably wearing a dark blue or red top as this is when noise is going to be most evident. With this test with the D810 and the D7200 I found that ISO 6400 was safe to use. Chroma noise was well controlled.

The problem with low light shooting is seldom the noise at the ISO setting needed for the exposure but rather the ability of the camera to lock focus quickly. That is where the additional cross type autofocus sensors of the D500 make a tremendous difference.

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2017 at 16:17 UTC as 6th comment | 1 reply
On article Applying color theory to landscape photography (88 comments in total)

One does not go out and "make pictures" unless you are talking about snapshots for some social media posting. Ansel Adams stated many years ago "The negative is comparable to the composer's score and the print to its performance. Each performance differs in subtle ways" but people still do not get it. The negative has been replaced by a RAW image file but that is still the starting point in creating the final "picture".

If someone cannot be bothered and prefers to capture to JPG and go right to the Web that is certainly OK but if someone really want to capture the essence of a place, as Bierstadt did with his paintings, then an understanding of the technical aspects will elevate the results of ones efforts.

More photographers than one might realize had classical training in other media before going into photography and with Cartier-Bresson there was a return later in life when he quit taking photographs altogether.

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2017 at 18:28 UTC as 6th comment | 1 reply

When the Leica cameras were the only game in town in the 40's, 50, and 60's, and they only provided a viewfinder usable for 50mm and shorter focal length lenses and offered very few focal lengths, I could understand photographers shooting nearly 100% with a 50mm lens on their 35mm film cameras. It makes no sense at all to be doing this now with all the great zoom lenses, like the Olympus 12-40mm f/2.8 (equivalent to 24-80mm f/2.8 on full frame DSLR). This lens is 2.75 x 3.3 inches in size and weighs 13.5 ounces. Added to the E-M1 Mark II camera with its battery and the total weight is only 2.1 pounds, or the weight of my D810 body alone.

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2017 at 18:12 UTC as 3rd comment

Posts by owners of DSLR cameras show remarkable ignorance and an inability to embrace new advances in technology. It reminds me of the Luddites who said 35mm was a waste of time as only a MF camera could produce quality images.

What is different with the MFT is the ability to shoot hand held with equivalent of a 600mm f/4 lens (using the Olympus 300mm f/4 IS lens) at 1/8s and get perfectly sharp images. Also no need to calibrate lenses to compensate with differences between the focus point with and without the mirror in position over the sensor.

A full MFT kit with two cameras and lenses with focal lengths from a 35mm or full frame equivalent of 14mm to 600mm at f/2.8 with the zooms and f/4 for the super telephoto, and two flash units, all fit in a 18 liter backpack and weighs about the same as my 600mm f/4 lens in its dedicated LoewPro bag with shoulder straps.

DSLR owners agonize over which lenses to take on a trip and this problem does not arise for the MFT system owner.

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2017 at 18:00 UTC as 14th comment | 3 replies
On photo Denali in the Landscapes with a "Wide Open aperture" challenge (11 comments in total)

This is the kind of scene where it would have been much better to shoot 3 frames at 70mm focal length and stitch them together. Going wider with the 24-70 would have reduced the relative size of the mountains in the background and so compromised the image even more.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2016 at 19:41 UTC as 1st comment | 1 reply
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1395 comments in total)
In reply to:

calson: As with so many other reviews the individual ignores completely the advantages in size, cost, and performance of the fast pro lenses available for this camera. It is very different than the situation with Canon or Nikon APS-C camera where owners have to use full frame lenses or mediocre wide angle zooms that are also slow. When it comes to a MFT camera and lens kit the MFT kit is going to be half the weight and half the bulk of the APS-C or full frame equivalent and half the cost. I have the Olympus 300mm f/4 OS lens and it is easily the equal of the Nikon 600mm f/4 VR lens that I also own and use and the Olympus lens was a third the cost and weighs 5 lbs. less and it small enough to get on a plane. With my full frame lenses a 500mm is the largest I can take in my carry on backpack.
Most performance issues mentioned are the type that can be corrected with firmware updates which will occur as with the E-M1 camera after its introduction.

Hey below averagejoe576 - who the hell are you badmouthing as a troll. I have thousands of posts on DPreview and own both the E-M1 and E-M5 Mark II cameras and have a E- M1 Mark II arriving today at my house.

I also have pro level APS-C and full frame cameras from Nikon and each has its place. There is no one camera that does it all or that is going to be the "best" in any given situation and it is crazy to talk about a camera without discussing the availability of lenses and flash and third party equipment to fill the gaps from the manufacturer. In terms of lenses and flash Olympus is far superior to Fuji. It is only for a dedicated video camera where there are definite advantages to using Sony cameras and the available cine lenses.

Link | Posted on Dec 15, 2016 at 19:24 UTC
On article Ultimate OM-D: Olympus E-M1 Mark II Review (1395 comments in total)

As with so many other reviews the individual ignores completely the advantages in size, cost, and performance of the fast pro lenses available for this camera. It is very different than the situation with Canon or Nikon APS-C camera where owners have to use full frame lenses or mediocre wide angle zooms that are also slow. When it comes to a MFT camera and lens kit the MFT kit is going to be half the weight and half the bulk of the APS-C or full frame equivalent and half the cost. I have the Olympus 300mm f/4 OS lens and it is easily the equal of the Nikon 600mm f/4 VR lens that I also own and use and the Olympus lens was a third the cost and weighs 5 lbs. less and it small enough to get on a plane. With my full frame lenses a 500mm is the largest I can take in my carry on backpack.
Most performance issues mentioned are the type that can be corrected with firmware updates which will occur as with the E-M1 camera after its introduction.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2016 at 13:34 UTC as 70th comment | 13 replies
On photo Street Food in the Your City - Local Street Vendor challenge (9 comments in total)

The composition with the man in the left side of the frame and the outstretched arm going to the highlighted corn works very well. What detracts from the picture is the busy background that competes with the viewer's eyes.

This is the kind of scene that needs to be worked with different angles and heights and apertures and focal lengths and shifting to change the background. It also shows why a 35mm focal length is a bad choice for street photography with its excessive depth of field and limitations for excluding detracting/distracting elements.

Link | Posted on Oct 26, 2016 at 01:32 UTC as 4th comment | 5 replies

A rodeo is a very easy environment for a camera's autofocus system. Plenty of light and hard edges on the subjects. Piece of cake compared to photographing the first dances at a wedding reception when the lights are low or the location is outdoors or otherwise dimly lit.

I have to wonder if the PR flacks set up these easy tests so their cameras will perform well in place of a meaningful situation that truly tests the autofocus system under difficult conditions.

No doubt the flagship Canon camera with its autofocus system designed for sports shooters is excellent but a rodeo "test" tells me nothing.

Link | Posted on Aug 1, 2016 at 19:49 UTC as 50th comment | 7 replies
Total: 32, showing: 1 – 20
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