James A Rinner

James A Rinner

Lives in United States Racine, United States
Works as a Inventor
Joined on Dec 13, 2003
About me:

James A. Rinner was born in 1955 and has been active in photography since 1960. A former professional photographer, he has shot over 1200 weddings (mostly free-lanced) and won five international awards in wedding photography. Because of travel for work he stopped shooting weddings in 1993, but has never stopped shooting. He is on his 12th (18th if you count the 5 E-10s and an E20 I use to teach photography) digital camera (Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II and Pen-F) and loves it!

Olympus E-M1 (Mark 1), E-M10, 5 E-10s, E-20N, 7-14 Panny, 28-40 PRO, 25mm 1.4, 60mm macro, 12-50mm, M14-150, 75-300mm, 4/3 adapted 85mm 1.7 MD Rokkor-X, FL-36, FL-50, Sunpack Ring Flash, Olympus C-7070, Olympus XZ-1, Bogen 3025 and 3001, both with ball heads and Manfrotto Carbon fiber CX190 Pro.

Comments

Total: 157, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Photo-Wiz: I recall having a Leica 35mm film compact camera. It was a jewel of a camera. But, it was actually a re-badged Panasonic camera. No doubt the Leica "label" on the camera resulted in better images than the "Panasonic" label. :-)

My mistake, did not know that. I was thinking of the 35mm film Leica CL and the Minolta CLE.

Link | Posted on Mar 18, 2021 at 17:05 UTC
In reply to:

Photo-Wiz: I recall having a Leica 35mm film compact camera. It was a jewel of a camera. But, it was actually a re-badged Panasonic camera. No doubt the Leica "label" on the camera resulted in better images than the "Panasonic" label. :-)

It was a Minolta.

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2021 at 23:12 UTC

Nice snowflakes. Here are mine but with the tiny M43 sensor!

https://www.shutterspeedblog.com/p692436421

Link | Posted on Nov 13, 2020 at 22:40 UTC as 20th comment | 3 replies

Looks like an Avon perfume bottle.

Link | Posted on Aug 14, 2020 at 19:28 UTC as 13th comment

Hasselblad 500C!

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2020 at 04:24 UTC as 64th comment

What a coincidence in reading this as I just developed a roll of TMax400. It has been over twenty years since I've done that!

Link | Posted on Apr 1, 2020 at 03:36 UTC as 60th comment | 1 reply
On article Film Fridays: Pentax MX – a nuts and bolts review (164 comments in total)

I have a Zeiss Ikon Contarex Bullseye with a 35mm, 50 and 135 lenses. You can borrow them for a film review!

Link | Posted on Mar 22, 2020 at 03:18 UTC as 14th comment

It is the "top waterproof camera on the market" yet only gets a silver award.

Link | Posted on Mar 18, 2020 at 17:05 UTC as 90th comment | 2 replies
On a photo in the Hasselblad X1D II 50C sample gallery (DPReview TV) sample gallery (1 comment in total)

Shot at f13 and hardly anything is in focus...

Link | Posted on Jan 9, 2020 at 17:26 UTC as 1st comment
In reply to:

James A Rinner: With all the resources that Canon has, they are just now bringing out something that Olympus did back in 2011. I love Canon and have for over 40 years.

DarnGoodPhotos, obviously you missed the point of the posts. It was not about megapixels or sensor size, but the add-on features like the EVF. Interesting screen name, but no images in your gallery.

BlackCoffee17, Cherry-pick? The point of my post was that Canon, given their resources and the abilty to look at what has been produced by other companies should have given us something more than mega-pixels. At least Canon could have looked at the Olympus Pen-F digital and said let's offer something that eclipses the Pen-F. Instead, they gave us a 32 MP Canon version of the Olympus EPL-1 from 2011.

Link | Posted on Sep 2, 2019 at 15:54 UTC

With all the resources that Canon has, they are just now bringing out something that Olympus did back in 2011. I love Canon and have for over 40 years.

Link | Posted on Aug 29, 2019 at 14:33 UTC as 240th comment | 4 replies
On article Is the Olympus OM-D E-M1X right for you? (389 comments in total)
In reply to:

James A Rinner: I want one...badly, but I can't afford one right now. I am slowly getting my personal collection of hundreds of vintage cameras and lenses on eBay to make the purchase.

For background information; I am a retired professional photographer (over 1200 weddings, national and international awards for wedding and portrait photography and gallery shows) who has shot with large format, medium format (my favorite with an almost complete Hasselblad outfit) and 35mm film cameras for most of my life.

Having my knowledge and background; why would I choose M43? I chose it because in the overall scheme of things M43 just works. I have never had a person say, while looking at my digital or printed photos, that my images suffered from too small a sensor. I also like the complete weather-sealing of the bodies and lenses. Even with the weight and size of the E-M1X body, the total package is smaller and lighter when comparing equal specs.

My post is a bit long so please see the next comment.

MeVee, I checked your profile and you have no photos in your gallery and no challenges entered...

Link | Posted on May 30, 2019 at 04:02 UTC
On article Is the Olympus OM-D E-M1X right for you? (389 comments in total)
In reply to:

James A Rinner: I want one...badly, but I can't afford one right now. I am slowly getting my personal collection of hundreds of vintage cameras and lenses on eBay to make the purchase.

For background information; I am a retired professional photographer (over 1200 weddings, national and international awards for wedding and portrait photography and gallery shows) who has shot with large format, medium format (my favorite with an almost complete Hasselblad outfit) and 35mm film cameras for most of my life.

Having my knowledge and background; why would I choose M43? I chose it because in the overall scheme of things M43 just works. I have never had a person say, while looking at my digital or printed photos, that my images suffered from too small a sensor. I also like the complete weather-sealing of the bodies and lenses. Even with the weight and size of the E-M1X body, the total package is smaller and lighter when comparing equal specs.

My post is a bit long so please see the next comment.

I already carry a E-M1 II with a battery grip and a Pen-F, but to be honest the biggest reason is the handheld high res and Live ND. I have a big collection of vintage cameras and lenses that are only gathering dust and when I die my kids will probably sell them at a garage sale. I will sell what I love and don't use for something I am sure I would love and use!

Link | Posted on May 29, 2019 at 04:16 UTC
On article Is the Olympus OM-D E-M1X right for you? (389 comments in total)
In reply to:

James A Rinner: I want one...badly, but I can't afford one right now. I am slowly getting my personal collection of hundreds of vintage cameras and lenses on eBay to make the purchase.

For background information; I am a retired professional photographer (over 1200 weddings, national and international awards for wedding and portrait photography and gallery shows) who has shot with large format, medium format (my favorite with an almost complete Hasselblad outfit) and 35mm film cameras for most of my life.

Having my knowledge and background; why would I choose M43? I chose it because in the overall scheme of things M43 just works. I have never had a person say, while looking at my digital or printed photos, that my images suffered from too small a sensor. I also like the complete weather-sealing of the bodies and lenses. Even with the weight and size of the E-M1X body, the total package is smaller and lighter when comparing equal specs.

My post is a bit long so please see the next comment.

These are my reasons and for most of the photography I continue to do M43 works perfectly for me. You can pixel-peep or noise hunt all day long but that doesn't make your photography any better. It was said (mostly jokingly) many years ago that "A new Hasselblad would take better pictures than your current camera." It could still be true today and I would love to have a new X1D, but I know the photos would only have more MP; the subject, composition and impact would remain the same. Ansel Adams once said (I believe it was from a TIME magazine interview I have filed away somewhere) There is nothing worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept."

For a close to this post, I would recommend you watch this video by Joe Elderman. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1869&v=LTVXZztmjCI&fbclid=IwAR0HTTaRW9YPVyUBlzL3Fr9MsDnBRyLVS32Hp5XQCQnnS1NGEr0rpc4xIZs and then just go out and shoot with the gear you have! Joe says "Sensor size, highly overrated, good photography is the key."

Link | Posted on May 28, 2019 at 16:13 UTC
On article Is the Olympus OM-D E-M1X right for you? (389 comments in total)

I want one...badly, but I can't afford one right now. I am slowly getting my personal collection of hundreds of vintage cameras and lenses on eBay to make the purchase.

For background information; I am a retired professional photographer (over 1200 weddings, national and international awards for wedding and portrait photography and gallery shows) who has shot with large format, medium format (my favorite with an almost complete Hasselblad outfit) and 35mm film cameras for most of my life.

Having my knowledge and background; why would I choose M43? I chose it because in the overall scheme of things M43 just works. I have never had a person say, while looking at my digital or printed photos, that my images suffered from too small a sensor. I also like the complete weather-sealing of the bodies and lenses. Even with the weight and size of the E-M1X body, the total package is smaller and lighter when comparing equal specs.

My post is a bit long so please see the next comment.

Link | Posted on May 28, 2019 at 16:13 UTC as 72nd comment | 12 replies
In reply to:

NaBalam: I have to agree with other comments: One of the best advantages of Micro Four Thirds and Mirrorless technology is the reduced size and weight. Why create something with all the drawbacks of a full sized DSLR?

Though the body is a little larger than the E-M1 II, the lenses are the same smaller and lighter M4/3 lenses. This is the major advantage to choose M4/3 over Full Frame.

Link | Posted on Jan 5, 2019 at 04:37 UTC
On article Panasonic S1 and S1R: What we know so far (884 comments in total)
In reply to:

James A Rinner: I don't get all this "death of M4/3" talk. A full frame sensor needs a full frame sized camera lens. Just because Nikon, Canon, Sigma and Panasonic have entered the FF mirrorless market the reason for the switch to M4/3 remains the same...size and weight.

Panasonic promises to continue to in the M43 cameras. https://www.43rumors.com/panasonic-underlines-long-term-commitment-to-both-micr-four-thirds-and-l-mount-system/

Link | Posted on Sep 27, 2018 at 03:30 UTC
On article Panasonic S1 and S1R: What we know so far (884 comments in total)

I don't get all this "death of M4/3" talk. A full frame sensor needs a full frame sized camera lens. Just because Nikon, Canon, Sigma and Panasonic have entered the FF mirrorless market the reason for the switch to M4/3 remains the same...size and weight.

Link | Posted on Sep 25, 2018 at 22:16 UTC as 52nd comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

James A Rinner: "It's just like a DSLR but physically it's totally different because it's so light weight."

How light weight is it when I add the same heavy lenses to the body? The whole idea of M4/3 was smaller lenses and they delivered on that. With the lens flange to sensor being shorter, by getting rid of the mirror box, does this allow for smaller/lighter lenses? I would think that the same size glass would be needed to cover the same size image circle of the sensor.

I would think that a shorter lens flange to sensor distance would allow you to make a lighter lens but there is still the large image circle that is required.

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2018 at 18:56 UTC
On article Using the Nikon Z7 vs. Nikon's DSLRs (33 comments in total)

A $600.00 kit lens?

Link | Posted on Aug 23, 2018 at 18:53 UTC as 7th comment | 2 replies
Total: 157, showing: 1 – 20
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