James A Rinner

James A Rinner

Lives in United States Racine, United States
Works as a Inventor
Joined on Dec 13, 2003
About me:

James A. Rinner was born in 1955 and has been active in photography since 1960. A former professional photographer, he has shot over 1200 weddings (mostly free-lanced) and won five international awards in wedding photography. Because of travel for work he stopped shooting weddings in 1993, but has never stopped shooting. He is on his 10th (16th if you count the 5 E-10s and an E20 I use to teach photography) digital camera (Olympus OM-D E-M1) and loves it!

Olympus E-M1 (Mark 1), E-M10, 5 E-10s, E-20N, 7-14 Panny, 28-40 PRO, 25mm 1.4, 60mm macro, 12-50mm, M14-150, 75-300mm, 4/3 adapted 85mm 1.7 MD Rokkor-X, FL-36, FL-50, Sunpack Ring Flash, Olympus C-7070, Olympus XZ-1, Bogen 3025 and 3001, both with ball heads and Manfrotto Carbon fiber CX190 Pro.

Comments

Total: 136, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Ten expert tips for successful macro photography (130 comments in total)
In reply to:

FafBill: Years ago there was a popular video commercial. I am a bit foggy on this. A young girl had a butterfly on her nose for several seconds. Then it flew away. Days later, I learned the trick to force a butterfly to remain stationary (on a human nose!!!) for a few seconds.
The photographer had a collection of butterflies. Each rested in it own compartment stored for a brief period in a refrigerator. There is a limit on how long a bug can survive in a cold fridge. There is also a limit on how long the bug or butterfly will remain stationary after being exposed to warm air.

My latest setup is the Olympus E-M1 and the Olympus 60mm macro lens, plus three stacked extension tubes (47mm worth) to get me the same amount of magnification as my old setup. Since these tubes have all the electrical contacts for the body to talk to the lens I can use the E-M1's focus bracketing mode to take up to 999 shots of stepped focus shifts. I still spend hours and hours doing the post work.

Link | Posted on Jul 31, 2017 at 19:23 UTC
On article Ten expert tips for successful macro photography (130 comments in total)
In reply to:

FafBill: Years ago there was a popular video commercial. I am a bit foggy on this. A young girl had a butterfly on her nose for several seconds. Then it flew away. Days later, I learned the trick to force a butterfly to remain stationary (on a human nose!!!) for a few seconds.
The photographer had a collection of butterflies. Each rested in it own compartment stored for a brief period in a refrigerator. There is a limit on how long a bug can survive in a cold fridge. There is also a limit on how long the bug or butterfly will remain stationary after being exposed to warm air.

The setup has changed throughout the years, but here is my two basic setups. The shots in 2015 and some in 2016 were done with an Olympus E-M5 and E-M1. Mounted to the body was an adapted Minolta MD 85mm 1.7 (35mm film lens) and then reverse mounted on the front of the Minolta was a 50mm 1.4 Olympus film lens. This gave me a 3.4:1 macro magnification on a micro 4/3 sensor (if you wanted to compare it to a full frame sensor you would be getting 6.8:1 magnification). At this extreme macro magnification the acceptable focus (depth of field) is just a sliver of the frame. I focus well before the flake then, with the camera set to 5FPS, continually change the focus till the whole flake has been passed over with frames of various "slivers" of the in focus. Some of these flakes have over fifty individual shots. I then import, align and blend all the images in Photoshop. Photoshop doesn't do a perfect job. I then spend hours and hours editing to get the final image.

Link | Posted on Jul 31, 2017 at 19:18 UTC
On article Ten expert tips for successful macro photography (130 comments in total)
In reply to:

gordzam: For real macro shots, I find Canon's MP-E65mm is hard to beat. Just put it on the cheapest DSLR body and even a single diffused 430EX can give great results. Lighting technique in macro is quite challenging, but once you start to understand how light behaves, you can get excellent results with a much cheaper set up. My shots on flickr:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/100085119@N03/

Great shots!

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2017 at 02:44 UTC
On article Ten expert tips for successful macro photography (130 comments in total)
In reply to:

FafBill: Years ago there was a popular video commercial. I am a bit foggy on this. A young girl had a butterfly on her nose for several seconds. Then it flew away. Days later, I learned the trick to force a butterfly to remain stationary (on a human nose!!!) for a few seconds.
The photographer had a collection of butterflies. Each rested in it own compartment stored for a brief period in a refrigerator. There is a limit on how long a bug can survive in a cold fridge. There is also a limit on how long the bug or butterfly will remain stationary after being exposed to warm air.

The cold also slows you down too! I stand outside for hours at a time to take macro photos of snowflakes! http://jamesarinner.zenfolio.com/p692436421

Link | Posted on Jul 25, 2017 at 02:43 UTC
On article Video: Removing a stuck lens filter... with a band saw (139 comments in total)
In reply to:

Joe Pineapples II: Heat and cold, and a non-slip rubber mat works better

Joe Pineapples is correct. Cooling the filter ring causes contraction of the male thread of the filter in the female thread of the lens.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2017 at 15:32 UTC

Amazing!

Link | Posted on Jan 2, 2017 at 17:01 UTC as 16th comment

That Olympus 12-40 for $467.00 Amazon add is a SCAM!

Link | Posted on Nov 21, 2016 at 18:56 UTC as 46th comment | 4 replies
On photo Snowflake 2016-013 1600 James A Rinner in James A Rinner's photo gallery (2 comments in total)

Thanks!

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2016 at 16:32 UTC as 1st comment
On photo Moonlike scenery in the Moonscape challenge (4 comments in total)

Very nice shot. Congratulations!

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2015 at 16:38 UTC as 1st comment
On photo Moonrise Glen Aulin 1400 P7310590 in the Moonscape challenge (7 comments in total)
In reply to:

Stevequad: Nice looking image

Thank you!

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2015 at 00:46 UTC
On photo Moonrise Glen Aulin 1400 P7310590 in the Moonscape challenge (7 comments in total)
In reply to:

antoxa: wonderfull!!

Thanks!

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2015 at 00:46 UTC
On photo Moonrise Glen Aulin 1400 P7310590 in the Moonscape challenge (7 comments in total)
In reply to:

SamTrekker: Can we have a version with E.T. on carriage bicycle flying over it ;)
Great Shot!

That would definitely make it a composite!

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2015 at 00:46 UTC
On photo Winter IMG_1533 in James A Rinner's photo gallery (2 comments in total)

Hi Don,

This is actually the first method I tried. Here is what I am currently doing.

I am using an Olympus OM-D E-M5. I have a 85mm f1.7 Minolta MD mounted to the camera body and a reverse mounted Olympus 50mm 1.4 on the front of the Minolta. Focus distance is 30mm from the front element. I machined a clear acrylic tube (to set the focus distance) and mounted it on a rear lens cap for the Olympus lens. I catch snowflakes on a piece of glass and set my camera and lens setup directly on the glass and do the final manual focus.

The full frame lenses give me almost 100% coverage on my 4/3 sensor. I would say I am probably getting at least 4:1 magnification across the sensor size.

Oh yes, that is what the spoon is for but I would rather catch them on the glass while it is snowing.

Link | Posted on Dec 31, 2014 at 23:11 UTC as 1st comment
On article Winter Wonderland: Don Komarechka's snowflakes (36 comments in total)
In reply to:

James A Rinner: My wife is getting me this book for my birthday! I just started photographing snowflakes last year and I am looking forward to reading about his process.

I just uploaded a few shots from last year into my gallery.

Link | Posted on Dec 31, 2014 at 20:47 UTC
On article Winter Wonderland: Don Komarechka's snowflakes (36 comments in total)

My wife is getting me this book for my birthday! I just started photographing snowflakes last year and I am looking forward to reading about his process.

Link | Posted on Dec 31, 2014 at 16:43 UTC as 10th comment | 2 replies
On photo L1000003-DNG in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (11 comments in total)

I look at these photos and they remind me of amateur snapshots. Here we have an $8000.00 camera body in the hands of point and shooters with no thought of composition or exposure. The power of the black and white image is lost here.

Alfred Eisenstaedt, if he were alive, would do wonders with this camera. He would start with composition and exposure and then post process it to perfection. Wasn't it Ansel Adams who said something along the line of "the negative is the composer's score while the image is the performance"?

"The ‘machine-gun’ approach to photography – by which many negatives are made with the hope that one will be good – is fatal to serious results."
- Ansel Adams

Link | Posted on May 26, 2014 at 15:50 UTC as 1st comment
On a photo in the Leica M-Monochrom Preview Samples sample gallery (11 comments in total)

I look at these photos and they remind me of amateur snapshots. Here we have an $8000.00 camera body in the hands of point and shooters with no thought of composition or exposure. The power of the black and white image is lost here.

Alfred Eisenstaedt, if he were alive, would do wonders with this camera. He would start with composition and exposure and then post process it to perfection. Wasn't it Ansel Adams who said something along the line of "the negative is the composer's score while the image is the performance"?

"The ‘machine-gun’ approach to photography – by which many negatives are made with the hope that one will be good – is fatal to serious results."
- Ansel Adams

Link | Posted on May 26, 2014 at 15:50 UTC as 1st comment
On a photo in the Leica M-Monochrom Preview Samples sample gallery (1 comment in total)

I look at these photos and they remind me of amateur snapshots. Here we have an $8000.00 camera body in the hands of point and shooters with no thought of composition or exposure. The power of the black and white image is lost here.

Alfred Eisenstaedt, if he were alive, would do wonders with this camera. He would start with composition and exposure and then post process it to perfection. Wasn't it Ansel Adams who said something along the line of "the negative is the composer's score while the image is the performance"?

"The ‘machine-gun’ approach to photography – by which many negatives are made with the hope that one will be good – is fatal to serious results."
- Ansel Adams

Link | Posted on May 26, 2014 at 15:48 UTC as 1st comment
On photo L1000495-DNG in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (1 comment in total)

I look at these photos and they remind me of amateur snapshots. Here we have an $8000.00 camera body in the hands of point and shooters with no thought of composition or exposure. The power of the black and white image is lost here.

Alfred Eisenstaedt, if he were alive, would do wonders with this camera. He would start with composition and exposure and then post process it to perfection. Wasn't it Ansel Adams who said something along the line of "the negative is the composer's score while the image is the performance"?

"The ‘machine-gun’ approach to photography – by which many negatives are made with the hope that one will be good – is fatal to serious results."
- Ansel Adams

Link | Posted on May 26, 2014 at 15:48 UTC as 1st comment
On article Readers' Choice: Best Gear of 2013 Awards (194 comments in total)

I find it amusing that the author states "the E-M1 just edged out its two closest competitors, garnering 32.8% of the vote" when it actually got 37.2% more votes than the K-3 and 39.3% more votes than the X100S. Basically for every 2 votes the K-3 or the X100S got, the E-M1 got 3.

I would call it more of a landslide!

Link | Posted on Feb 3, 2014 at 18:09 UTC as 18th comment
Total: 136, showing: 1 – 20
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