rfsIII

Lives in United States Cemetery, MD, United States
Works as a Dead
Has a website at http://bit.ly/2k9hZDm
Joined on Sep 9, 2006
About me:

Please do not respond to this guy's postings. Something about coming to this site makes him looney and his fingers go out of control on the keyboard. As a matter of fact, if you meet him on the road with the Buddha, kill them both.

Comments

Total: 905, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
On article Sony a9 shooting experience: Here's why I'm impressed (503 comments in total)
In reply to:

mxx: "... this camera is among the best I've ever used, bar none."

What exactly does this mean?

Writing for the internet means frantically piling cliche upon commonplace in a doomed effort to convince the reader that the subject at hand is the most! least! best! worst! that has ever happened.

Linguistically speaking we live in barbarous times. No one under 40 has the refinement to appreciate, let alone write, a beautiful sentence. It's like a second Dark Ages where whole generations have lost the ability to use words incisively and well.

So be glad you were able to experience English prose when it was at its apogee. Just as in our time poetry has become an anachronism, in a few generations prose will be relegated to an obligation that we grudgingly fulfill once or twice a decade—joining harpsichord playing, respect for knowledge, and the ability to throw a fabulous dinner party in the debris field of our once great culture.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2017 at 03:02 UTC
On article Sony a9 shooting experience: Here's why I'm impressed (503 comments in total)
In reply to:

ChrisH37: I'm thinking less of the a9 as a pro sports camera (I'm sure FE will be in future, but it's not quite there yet) and more of a pro wedding camera right now.

Silent shooting, excellent eye AF, dual card slots, better battery life, all the lenses a wedding photographer is likely to need. Silent shooting alone will have some guys considering a switch if it truely works in artificial lighting without banding etc.

Well, if the camera doesn't make any noise, doesn't that mean the vicar will never know you're taking pictures?

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2017 at 02:22 UTC
On article Sony a9 shooting experience: Here's why I'm impressed (503 comments in total)
In reply to:

keeponkeepingon: " Yes, the a9 has an amazing buffer that I never once hit, but that buffer takes a good amount of time to clear."

According to Tony Northrup that "good amount of time" is up to 2 minutes.

Insane.

What functions where not available while the buffer was clearing.? Can you review images from the burst?

Thanks!
\

I have my differences with the way this site now reviews cameras, but Tony Northrup is definitely not in the same league as the dudes (plus two women) of DPR.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2017 at 02:16 UTC
In reply to:

vscd: Is it worth to be mentioned that Frederik Buyckx works with an old Canon 5D Mark II most of the times? That old sensor with limited dynamic range, banding and huge weight. He should soon get rid of his old "mirrorslapper" and go to the future of the world: mirrorless. I guess he would be pleased in this cold winterlandscape with a back full of batteries ;)

This is almost always true. It's because once an artist gets his or her tools dialed in, they see no need to change unless forced. I have a friend who is an art photographer who exhibits all over the world and he still uses a NIKON F2

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2017 at 03:46 UTC
On article The Leica Summaron 28mm F5.6 is old-fashioned fun (189 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jacob the Photographer: I have a Fujifilm XT-2 with an adaptor for Leica. I own a Summarit 5cm 1.5 made in my year of birth , so yes about 60+ years old.
It is an interesting lens , about a heavy as the camera , incredible Bokeh , and for some portrait OK to use. But honestly I prefer a autofocus 50mm Fujinon , why would we / I torture myself trying to focus this lens I wonder , but I also enjoy it as a fun/toy (sorry Leica) . In the 1970's / 1980's I worked day after day subsequently with Leica M2 , M3 , M4 , M5 as in those days it was OK and lighter as say a Nikon F , but as soon I got a Nikon F3 I realised what an antique thing a Leica really was: not professional at all. To slow in every respect, to sensitive for internal damage , to sensitive shutter , to slow sync speed etc. A collectors brand nothing more nothing less.

That is an interesting insight. I had always heard that Leicas were beloved by photojournalists because they were tough and would work in any kind of awful weather.
I always learn something new here.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 04:02 UTC
On article The Leica Summaron 28mm F5.6 is old-fashioned fun (189 comments in total)
In reply to:

babart: Dudes, get over the complaints about Leica fetishes......haven't you ever wished you could afford a Ferrari? :)

I wanted an M3 so bad back in the '50s ...... never owned one, but my primary camera today is a FujiX-E2....a poor man's Leica M3. The Fuji also has small and very good lenses. Ah....feel the passion :).

There is nothing unimportant about Ferraris unless you're a Porsche driver.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 03:53 UTC

Everyone is complaining about the noise from this camera at higher ISOs, but maybe there's life left in the old girl yet. Has anyone tried processing the raws with a current version of Lightroom? It has a pretty powerful noise reduction algo.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 03:27 UTC as 28th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Peiasdf: Back then DPReview's sample images have so much culture, history and variety unlike the cold, wet, bluish hue of photos from Seattle.

America ruins everything. Or maybe these kids want their photos on the cool side—an artistic manifestation of the frozen hearts they carry around in their chests.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 03:25 UTC

How do we know this isn't just a re-housed Canon 70-200 f/4 IS with a motor on the bottom?

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 03:18 UTC as 4th comment | 1 reply
On article Hands-on with the Panasonic Leica 8-18mm F2.8-4 (155 comments in total)

What is “splashproof”? Splash has a disturbingly non-quantitative definition in English.

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 05:03 UTC as 21st comment | 9 replies
In reply to:

quietrich: Andy Warhol wasn't the first nor the last artist to use appropriated material for his work. The idea of 'appropriation art' has been mainstream for generations, and is generally accepted as legitimate artistic expression. Check out:
Barbara Kruger, Richard Prince, Sigmar Polke, Richard Pettibone, Wang Guangyi, ...and many more.
Then there is the question of using photographic archives in work that re-positions commonly owned photographs within a different context. Most museums and galleries have used public archives to create 'cultural' or 'societal' exhibits.
Then what about using other's ideas? How much art references other peoples work? Most of it I think.
In other words, This nonsense from Lynn Goldsmith and the Andy Warhol Trust has everything to do with money, and nothing to do with art. The lawyers must be rubbing their hands, and ordering car brochures.

The art world is a cynical economic ecosystem with the all the participants you mentioned working to carve off a piece of the action for themselves. Once we left cave painting behind, "high" art has been about power and money—from Titian and Velasquez to the flavor of the week in Williamsburg.
Is appropriation theft? By any yardstick of decency yes it is. People who argue otherwise like the moral imbiciles at Stanford are co-conspirators angling for their own share of the plunder.

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 14:10 UTC
In reply to:

quietrich: Andy Warhol wasn't the first nor the last artist to use appropriated material for his work. The idea of 'appropriation art' has been mainstream for generations, and is generally accepted as legitimate artistic expression. Check out:
Barbara Kruger, Richard Prince, Sigmar Polke, Richard Pettibone, Wang Guangyi, ...and many more.
Then there is the question of using photographic archives in work that re-positions commonly owned photographs within a different context. Most museums and galleries have used public archives to create 'cultural' or 'societal' exhibits.
Then what about using other's ideas? How much art references other peoples work? Most of it I think.
In other words, This nonsense from Lynn Goldsmith and the Andy Warhol Trust has everything to do with money, and nothing to do with art. The lawyers must be rubbing their hands, and ordering car brochures.

Appropriation is theft. The opinion of those who profit from the crime—the artists and gallery owners—is irrelevant.

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 12:54 UTC
In reply to:

Dragonrider: You don't need to stay dry, just the camera. So why not an umbrella for the camera that bolts to the tripod mount. Just needs to be u-shaped (kind of like a Raspberry tent), Anybody that wants to build it can have the idea for 5% of sales :-).

That's already a thing. Superclamp+Magic arm+umbrella swivel+umbrella.

Link | Posted on Apr 16, 2017 at 02:29 UTC
In reply to:

dash2k8: This piece is overly opinionated. It basically tells the reader repeatedly "this is dumb; don't buy it." I think we're all smart enough to make purchase decisions on our own, we don't need a condescending article to impose the author's personal distaste on us. If they filed this under "opinion" or "editorial," fine, but "news"? Long live responsible journalism.

It's weird for sure. Mr B is in the top two or three of the staff for both photographic prowess and writing ability. This seems a little beneath a person of his talent.

Link | Posted on Apr 16, 2017 at 02:26 UTC
In reply to:

Marty4650: Before the hysteria sets in.... look at the facts:

300 prople a year die falling off a ladder
500 people a year die while walking on train tracks
1,000 people a year die falling down stairs
5,000 people a year drown in swimming pools or swimming at the beach
5,000 pedestrians a year are killed by motor vehicles
34,000 people die each year while driving or riding in motor vehicles

Sure looks like we should be outraged about people taking photos at the beach, at swimming pools, of highway traffic, of people crossing streets, or of people using ladders.

It is sad that we need to have group outrage over every dangerous thing that can happen in life. And lets make sure we don't photograph these things, because it might encourage more risk taking.

Once again, the point is that no one cares if YOU want to go kill yorself; BUT if someone wants you to take their picture on a train track, it is your moral responsibility to say "no" because you would be risking the life of another person.

Link | Posted on Apr 16, 2017 at 02:02 UTC
On article Nikon D7500: What you need to know (533 comments in total)
In reply to:

TerryCM: How many people on this site, started on film ? In 1982 I bought a Nikon F3 and never felt the need to "upgrade". What is it with people that just want more and more ? I have done weddings with a 6 Mpx camera twelve years ago, and with an F3 film camera 25 years ago. All of my customers were happy with the results. Still use the F3, my current DSLR is a 16 Mpx Pentax and I still have satisfied customers !

I started on film and I replace my digital cams as they wear out which is about every other generation.

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2017 at 10:11 UTC
In reply to:

Marty4650: Before the hysteria sets in.... look at the facts:

300 prople a year die falling off a ladder
500 people a year die while walking on train tracks
1,000 people a year die falling down stairs
5,000 people a year drown in swimming pools or swimming at the beach
5,000 pedestrians a year are killed by motor vehicles
34,000 people die each year while driving or riding in motor vehicles

Sure looks like we should be outraged about people taking photos at the beach, at swimming pools, of highway traffic, of people crossing streets, or of people using ladders.

It is sad that we need to have group outrage over every dangerous thing that can happen in life. And lets make sure we don't photograph these things, because it might encourage more risk taking.

It merits mention because it is the only kind of death that photographers can prevent. And it really is a dumb way to die.

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2017 at 02:01 UTC

With the camera way off on the side like that it looks kind of tippy

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2017 at 21:13 UTC as 5th comment | 1 reply
On article Sigma sd Quattro H real world samples gallery (108 comments in total)
In reply to:

tom43: If you want to get most realistic colors, go for slide film. All these digital sensors have still not reached the color depth of a Provia or Velvia.

Have you shot 35mm slide film with the ultra sharp lenses of today or are you still using film era lenses? I'm curious if film can keep up with contemporary lenses.

Link | Posted on Apr 11, 2017 at 01:17 UTC
In reply to:

Jim Evidon: I am not surprised at the apparent low sales. What use is a 360 degree camera aside from use as a security camera or a novelty for someone who already bought all the latest other gadgets? All 360 degree images, especially the video ones are rather disorienting to view. Believe me, I'm not trolling. I just don't see a general application that would generate this a a successful sales item.

May not be art yet but 360 vid is becoming a staple of news. Check out the 360 at NYT.com.

Link | Posted on Apr 11, 2017 at 00:42 UTC
Total: 905, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »