KLO82

Lives in Bangladesh Bangladesh
Joined on Oct 29, 2010

Comments

Total: 31, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12Next ›Last »

He still enjoys working with 5Diii which is an old camera (released in 2012), has banding and relatively low DR. That seems preposterous here in dpreview :) . He also uses an A7R, but mainly for keeping low profile and when he needs video with stills.

Link | Posted on May 22, 2017 at 16:39 UTC as 4th comment
On article Sony a9: more speed, less dynamic range (576 comments in total)
In reply to:

chshooter: Be it a sports camera or not. People who want to spend big bucks on a flagship camera expect the best technology and quality in every way. Professional cameras are not just meant for sport but have to be reliable powerhouses that handle everything well. Having the camera fall short of the established competition is a dealbreaker. The once famous Sony dynamic range has now dropped below Canon level. Same happened with the a99II which is even worse than its five year old predecessor.

Many professionals are still buying and using 5D III which has banding and relatively low DR.

Link | Posted on May 18, 2017 at 12:41 UTC

Why no Fuji X70?

Link | Posted on May 15, 2017 at 10:58 UTC as 194th comment | 2 replies
On article Sony FE 100mm F2.8 STF gallery and first impressions (316 comments in total)

Looks like the bokeh is very distracting for not being distracting.

Sometimes limitation of technology enforce certain aesthetics in imaging. For example movies were shot in 24fps because it was the lowest frame rate that resulted in smooth motion, but it was not close to the "true" fps of human eye/ brain (which is closer to 60 fps or something) . But 24 fps was chosen to keep the film cost low. And now it has become a part of cinematic look. Movie cameras were used with dollys and cranes because those movie cameras were huge and very hard to carry. Now the smooth motion associated with cranes and dollys has become a part of the cinematic aesthetic. Photography itself is a technology (and art) with limitation - we are representing 3D world in a 2D screen or paper, and it has created a certain look. Now it seems that we are too used to the bokeh of the imperfect-bokeh lenses and the sterile look of this perfect bokeh machine looks unappealing to many.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2017 at 08:14 UTC as 21st comment | 3 replies
On article Sony FE 100mm F2.8 STF gallery and first impressions (316 comments in total)

Looks like the bokeh is very distracting by not being distracting.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2017 at 07:52 UTC as 23rd comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

KLO82: From my understanding, Canon used 1.3x crop because sports/ action photographers do not have the scope to focus and recompose and traditionally full frame af points do not cover the rule of thirds intersecting points. May be current frame coverage of AF points of FF cameras are good enough and that's why they have stopped producing the 1.3x cameras.

But D3 AF points didn't cover the rule of thirds intersecting points, but 1DII's AF points did. This is what Canon wanted to achieve with 1.3x crop sensors.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2017 at 11:59 UTC

From my understanding, Canon used 1.3x crop because sports/ action photographers do not have the scope to focus and recompose and traditionally full frame af points do not cover the rule of thirds intersecting points. May be current frame coverage of AF points of FF cameras are good enough and that's why they have stopped producing the 1.3x cameras.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2017 at 10:40 UTC as 113th comment | 4 replies
On article Sony a9 shooting experience (1281 comments in total)
In reply to:

dash2k8: Can someone confirm if the Sony Eye AF is the same thing that Canon had in the EOS-3 from the 90's? I believe it was called the Eye-Control system.

Not same. Eye-AF detects and tracks subject's eye (not the photographer's eye to understand where to focus).

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2017 at 10:06 UTC
On article Sony a9 shooting experience (1281 comments in total)

It seems to me that there is huge difference in philosophies between Canon and Sony regarding their imaging products.

In Canon's view, all the problems/ limitations in photography have already been solved, the technology is matured. There is no need for anything revolutionary. Just fine tune/ slightly modify your existing products and reiterate them - and ensure the reliability of the products. If you still can not get your intended photographs with the current products (cameras and lenses), may be the limitation is you.

Whereas in Sony's view, there are still many more limitations/ problems to overcome in imaging - there is much to be done.

Eventually, we will see who's view is closer to reality.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2017 at 08:59 UTC as 108th comment | 7 replies
On article Sony a9 shooting experience (1281 comments in total)

There are many photographers who are impressed, but will not consider buying this camera because they think they do not need the "advantages" and features this camera offers. Their current camera is good enough for what they photograph. In a sense, Sony is offering a solution to some problems. But these problems do not exist for some photographers. As if it has been done because it can be done (technologically feasible), not necessarily because it is needed.

There are sometimes when new products had been offered which we didn't even know that we needed. Only after getting it, it has become essential for us. Example: Facebook. So we have to see if this product is like that, or just a technological showcase.

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2017 at 06:32 UTC as 118th comment | 14 replies
On article Nikon announces midrange D7500 DSLR (396 comments in total)

What is the difference between Dynamic Area AF and Group Area AF?

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2017 at 08:12 UTC as 78th comment | 1 reply

Here are the Panavision Primo V lenses which claim same characteristics (low sharpness): "The image from a Primo V has sharper corners, a flatter field, and exhibits greater balance from center to edge than lenses that are not optimized for digital capture. At the same time, the characteristics of the classic Primos serve to counter the hyper-sharpness often associated with digital capture."
http://www.panavision.com/products/primo-v%C2%AE-lenses

Link | Posted on Mar 31, 2017 at 06:37 UTC as 12th comment | 1 reply

On a full frame DSLR, if I have to choose a fixed focal length lens, it will be 35mm f2.8 (or faster). If I have to choose a zoom it will be 24-105mm f4.

Link | Posted on Mar 27, 2017 at 15:05 UTC as 157th comment
On article Sony SLT a99 II Review (1573 comments in total)
In reply to:

Greg Ness: Not so good for: Those needing accurate focus tracking.

Good grief! Who needs a camera without accurate focus tracking? Not me!

@Rishi: Is it worse than A7R ki for candid portraits? And what FF camera would you use if you had to choose one camera for candid portraits (from any brand)?

Link | Posted on Feb 15, 2017 at 17:15 UTC
On article Sony Planar T* FE 50mm F1.4 ZA Sample Gallery (269 comments in total)
In reply to:

PB47: This is off topic but I wish 43mm had become the standard kit lens instead of 50mm. There's a Luminous Landscape article about 40mm lenses that mentions an interview with Sally Mann where she says 40mm is "about right" (she mainly shot with an Olympus 40mm for years). I love the full frame images I've seen out of that Pentax 43mm. 43mm just seems like the sweet spot. Pentax nailed it. If only Canon would make a fast 43mm 1.8 STM. That's my dream lens. But only Pentax will do something that weird.

Canon's 40mm f2.8 is actually 43mm. See dxomark's measurement.

Link | Posted on Jul 12, 2016 at 06:58 UTC
On article Fast telezoom: Sigma 50-100mm F1.8 sample images (164 comments in total)
In reply to:

Kaso: On an APS-C camera, the Sigma 18-35/1.8 Art and this Sigma 50-100/1.8 Art are equivalent to over a dozen f/1.8 primes at top performance. Simply awesome!

Half a dozen may be :)

Link | Posted on Jun 10, 2016 at 18:49 UTC
In reply to:

PeteGrady: It helps to have really attractive models. Using anything shorter than ~28mm becomes really challenging with everyday people. These look good in part because of the models, and even then I think some miss the mark. It's good to urge photographers to break from their comfort zones as long as there are sufficient alerts to where the problems can crop up. Rishi does a bit of that and I'd like to see more...like how sensitive this style of portraiture is to moving the camera above or below the subjects eyes. It can get exaggerated VERY quickly. Ultimately I'm more impressed by his use of light.

"Those were just metered for the face" - what is the exposure compensation needed if metered for a white person's face? What about black and brown people?

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2016 at 05:36 UTC

That brunette model looks a bit like Gal Gadot.

Link | Posted on Feb 15, 2016 at 04:41 UTC as 60th comment | 1 reply
On article X-Factor: Canon's EOS-1D X Mark II examined in-depth (615 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dester Wallaboo: I heard a saying once from a photographer I highly respect: "Amateurs talk about gear. Professionals talk about composition. Masters talk about light."

“When art critics get together they talk about Form and Structure and Meaning. When artists get together they talk about where you can buy cheap turpentine.”

― Pablo Picasso

Link | Posted on Feb 6, 2016 at 14:59 UTC
On article Framing fashion with Dixie Dixon (46 comments in total)

Why don't you make an option to "like" the features/ articles? Just like the way we "like" the comments.

Link | Posted on Feb 6, 2016 at 13:17 UTC as 25th comment | 2 replies
Total: 31, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12Next ›Last »