Sergey Borachev

Lives in Australia Australia
Joined on Jan 16, 2012

Comments

Total: 375, showing: 1 – 20
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On article The Sony a9 is a 24MP sports-shooting powerhouse (1843 comments in total)

GAME OVER!!!

for DSLRs.

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 16:56 UTC as 288th comment | 8 replies
On article Hands-on with the Panasonic Leica 8-18mm F2.8-4 (155 comments in total)

Just waiting to see if it delivers. In particular, I have these 2 questions:

1. Does it cause purple spots on Olympus camera? And

2. Is the distortion going to be a problem?

If no problem with these, then the only question left is - is there still any reason to buy any of the 7-14mm lenses?

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 04:12 UTC as 24th comment | 10 replies

Amazing! Panasonic is fine with 20MP in this tiny 1/2.3" sensor camera, but only used an old 16MP sensor in the G85. Can the G85 really threaten the GH5?

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 03:54 UTC as 19th comment | 2 replies

A simple question that I would have asked Sony: Why can't you make your cameras a little bigger to fix all the existing problems - heat, battery life (larger batteries), ergonomics, and better/more controls?

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2017 at 11:59 UTC as 42nd comment | 18 replies
On article Nikon D7500: Should I upgrade from my D7200? (260 comments in total)
In reply to:

ewitte12: It should have been released as a D5700 and a few hundred $ over the 5600.

Mystery solved, finally!!! Bravo!

Somebody in Nikon made a typo. D5700, not D7500.

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2017 at 22:55 UTC
On article Nikon D7500: Should I upgrade from my D7200? (260 comments in total)
In reply to:

Alexis D: Nice job, Richard. Nikon can use all the help it can get at this time.

Yup. Nice try!

Link | Posted on Apr 17, 2017 at 11:48 UTC
In reply to:

bolt2014: In the not too distant future, I see the only digital SLR makers left will be Sony, Canon and Fuji.

It is often necessary to project, make assumptions, and speculate in order to plan ahead and not just react. What I post was based on what I have seen up till now of the strengths, weaknesses, attitude and of course the trend and developments over many years. You know, trends and developments in smartphones, video taking, MILC pros and cons, and actual sales figures as well as company news (Nikon, Panasonic, ...)

Link | Posted on Apr 15, 2017 at 00:43 UTC
In reply to:

Edgar_in_Indy: How do they know there would have been an overall decline without Sony in the market? Is there no chance those people would have bought other cameras? Seems like a curious claim to make...

This does look like Sony propaganda. However, I have no doubt that Sony's increased sales has contributed to the growth in latest market figures, even if it should turn out to be a brief one. Whether it's 2% or 1 or 0.5% does not matter that much, not as important as the directions or projections the results are showing regarding DSLRs/MILCs, Sony's market share growth, and importantly its ability to break the FF duopoly, something not expected just a couple of years ago, should be seen as a breakthrough.

Link | Posted on Apr 15, 2017 at 00:14 UTC
In reply to:

mujana: I wonder how this situation is worldwide.

I believe that in Asia and Europe, MILCs are gaining on DSLRs consistently.

Link | Posted on Apr 15, 2017 at 00:08 UTC
In reply to:

bolt2014: In the not too distant future, I see the only digital SLR makers left will be Sony, Canon and Fuji.

We should not under-estimate the power of change, and the conditions are just right, with DSLRs saturated and fading, the camera market crashing, and consumer requirements and even the hobby of photography getting redefined. I think the new world order will look more like this in the more distant future, say in 10 years' time:

1. Sony
2. Fuji
3. Canon
4. Olympus
5. Panasonic

but if we combine Olympus and Panasonic as M43, then it's:

1. Sony
2. M43
3. Fuji
4. Canon

We need new leadership in this industry. The old ways that Canikon insisted on are partly to blame for the downturn, which hopefully ends as camera sales, led by MILCs, bottoms out. Keep an eye on Fuji, the slow but steady tortoise in this race. It may be taking the lead some time in future as the most popular brand, though not in FF.

Link | Posted on Apr 15, 2017 at 00:02 UTC

This is based on sales in the first 2 months in 2017. The reason you see mainly Canikon in the streets is because what you see include cameras bought over many years. This is still very very important as it shows the trend from now on, and, only new sales are important for the manufacturers. This may be the tipping point for mirrorless and may.indicate huge change coming.

Sony deserves this for going boldly where there is a future. Going full stream ahead in FF Milcs in 3 different flavours, such commitment. 👏👏👏

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2017 at 23:20 UTC as 97th comment
On article Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500: Which is better for you? (387 comments in total)

Easy! The D7500 is unbuyable. I think most will either stay with the D7200 or get the D500.

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2017 at 10:35 UTC as 115th comment | 9 replies
On article Nikon D7500: What you need to know (533 comments in total)
In reply to:

Franka T.L.: By stripping away some important and much loved D7200 but yet do not offer proper true enthusiasts level in key performance area. NIKON is trying hard to sway people to buy D500. I think its too hard in fact. The 4k 2.55x crop is a joke. People want super 35 coverage when they have a super 35 sensor. Lack of dual card slot is a big disappointment not to mention lack of support for up to date fast i/o on memory cards. I was on the fence waiting for the D7500 but NIKON give me now every reason not to get one and no not the D500 either.

Nikon is trying to push people to the D500 by having models like this, chopping off the second memory card slot and lowering MPs, etc. Give some improvement to the D7200 and take something back. Nikon should look at what happened to the Olympus E-M5 II, which was also a lame upgrade trying to push people to go up but it did not lose some old features. Olympus also tried to push E-M5 owners to the flagship E-M1 but that was not very successful. People don't want to pay for fancy things that don't need to get some essential features that should be in the upgraded mid range camera. The result is numerous people, even after waiting years, did not bother upgrading to the em5 II and also did not go up to the E-M1 either. Lose-Lose.

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2017 at 06:01 UTC
On article Nikon D7500: What you need to know (533 comments in total)

What is this??? Seems to me this should be called a D400 Junior.

Now, get back to work and make a proper D7300.

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2017 at 02:24 UTC as 32nd comment | 1 reply
On article CP+ 2017: Olympus interview: 'We chose to be bold' (350 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sergey Borachev: Unbelievable. He kept saying stills oriented, stills, stills,.stills ... but the most basic requirement for stills cameras is IQ. There's so little in sensor IQ improvement in Olympus cameras in the last 5 years, with the result that it's IQ is clearly less when compared with competitors APSC cameras and by a margin that is more than what the difference in sensor sizes suggests (DPR review finding). All I can say is that they are indeed very bold to increase prices so much while delivering so little in IQ.

I can happily live with 5 stops of IS instead of 6, with just HD video instead of 4K (video is supplemental, yeah, right), with just 10 fps instead of 15, and with just a tilt LCD instead of the video FAS, and none of the gimmicks like HiRes, for a stills oriented camera.

@S1rf4n. Are you saying that from now on, we will see sports photogs all using E-M1 IIs? ROFL.

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2017 at 12:30 UTC
On article CP+ 2017: Olympus interview: 'We chose to be bold' (350 comments in total)
In reply to:

Sergey Borachev: Unbelievable. He kept saying stills oriented, stills, stills,.stills ... but the most basic requirement for stills cameras is IQ. There's so little in sensor IQ improvement in Olympus cameras in the last 5 years, with the result that it's IQ is clearly less when compared with competitors APSC cameras and by a margin that is more than what the difference in sensor sizes suggests (DPR review finding). All I can say is that they are indeed very bold to increase prices so much while delivering so little in IQ.

I can happily live with 5 stops of IS instead of 6, with just HD video instead of 4K (video is supplemental, yeah, right), with just 10 fps instead of 15, and with just a tilt LCD instead of the video FAS, and none of the gimmicks like HiRes, for a stills oriented camera.

With a smaller sensor size than competitors, you would think they would do everything possible to get the best sensor to say competitive. Panasonic focuses on video with its flagship, which is their forte and therefore good strategy. Movie makers will be happy to pay up for the GH5. Olympus focuses on action/sports, which the cheaper D500 can do better unfortunately. Bad strategy.

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2017 at 12:25 UTC
On article CP+ 2017: Olympus interview: 'We chose to be bold' (350 comments in total)

Unbelievable. He kept saying stills oriented, stills, stills,.stills ... but the most basic requirement for stills cameras is IQ. There's so little in sensor IQ improvement in Olympus cameras in the last 5 years, with the result that it's IQ is clearly less when compared with competitors APSC cameras and by a margin that is more than what the difference in sensor sizes suggests (DPR review finding). All I can say is that they are indeed very bold to increase prices so much while delivering so little in IQ.

I can happily live with 5 stops of IS instead of 6, with just HD video instead of 4K (video is supplemental, yeah, right), with just 10 fps instead of 15, and with just a tilt LCD instead of the video FAS, and none of the gimmicks like HiRes, for a stills oriented camera.

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2017 at 12:07 UTC as 60th comment | 30 replies
In reply to:

Sergey Borachev: In an ideal world, all cameras use something standard like DNG, so that there's no issue with software support, and software will be cheaper. It's Sigma and Pentax (Ricoh) using DNG for now, but hopefully there will be more in the future.

Similarly, all APSC and M43 cameras ideally would use the same mount, for choices in lenses, much lower prices, and choice of camera bodies to use. You can just buy bodies, whether it's made by Sigma, Pentax, Olympus or Canon based on particular features needed for the application at the time, and use it with your set of lenses, which means more sales. For now, people are reluctant to switch systems. We do have Panasonic, Olympus, and a few others ... using the same mount. Sigma like some other niche camera makers (Samsung and Pentax) will never make it big without a good range of lenses. It would make sense for them to join M43 with their MiLCs, but they didn't.

So, prices continue to rise and only the dominant makers will survive.

TOMMI, I see what's the problem here. You were talking about the first IBM PC called the XT,.with its 8088 bus made by Intel, green monitor and 5 1/4 inch floppy drive, but no hard drive and many off the shelf parts. It was not exactly a computer for serious work. I have one right here. In my first message, I mentioned IBM's PC 30 years ago, ie around 1987, not 1981. That was officially called the PS/2, and it had all the proprietary things I mentioned, IBM MCA bus,.IBM.Token Ring network, IBM memory slots, etc. Aren't we happy that IBM failed and industry standards prevailed?

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2017 at 09:11 UTC
In reply to:

Sergey Borachev: In an ideal world, all cameras use something standard like DNG, so that there's no issue with software support, and software will be cheaper. It's Sigma and Pentax (Ricoh) using DNG for now, but hopefully there will be more in the future.

Similarly, all APSC and M43 cameras ideally would use the same mount, for choices in lenses, much lower prices, and choice of camera bodies to use. You can just buy bodies, whether it's made by Sigma, Pentax, Olympus or Canon based on particular features needed for the application at the time, and use it with your set of lenses, which means more sales. For now, people are reluctant to switch systems. We do have Panasonic, Olympus, and a few others ... using the same mount. Sigma like some other niche camera makers (Samsung and Pentax) will never make it big without a good range of lenses. It would make sense for them to join M43 with their MiLCs, but they didn't.

So, prices continue to rise and only the dominant makers will survive.

@TOMMI. ... continuing from above.

Same for graphics card and peripheral cards (for printers etc). All proprietary and super expensive MCA products for IBM. Some of those ports like printer port were standard ones on IBM PCs but they were only available through proprietary cards. An IBM PC system in a company typically costed about $10,000 (when each dollar was a lot more than today). Few people have their own PCs.

Then the use of standardised components picked up. Manufacturers were able to justify the costs of making VLSI and mass production of common components, driving costs down. The pace of change with PC technology allowed throwing old PCs away, to provide the opportunity for change. With cameras, the old lenses are still usable, delaying any movement to open standards. This hopefully will also happen with cameras one day, if the current disastrous market conditions and more use technology can change the mentality of the smaller players before they vanish.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2017 at 23:23 UTC
In reply to:

Sergey Borachev: In an ideal world, all cameras use something standard like DNG, so that there's no issue with software support, and software will be cheaper. It's Sigma and Pentax (Ricoh) using DNG for now, but hopefully there will be more in the future.

Similarly, all APSC and M43 cameras ideally would use the same mount, for choices in lenses, much lower prices, and choice of camera bodies to use. You can just buy bodies, whether it's made by Sigma, Pentax, Olympus or Canon based on particular features needed for the application at the time, and use it with your set of lenses, which means more sales. For now, people are reluctant to switch systems. We do have Panasonic, Olympus, and a few others ... using the same mount. Sigma like some other niche camera makers (Samsung and Pentax) will never make it big without a good range of lenses. It would make sense for them to join M43 with their MiLCs, but they didn't.

So, prices continue to rise and only the dominant makers will survive.

@TOMMI You were wrong. Those ports and slots were not off-shelves. You must be too young 30 years ago to know this.

Ports used for connecting to a network or connecting a monitor were provided at the back of expansion cards. The cards had contact edges designed to fit expansion slots, both were proprietary for IBM PCs. MCA cards and slots. Other "Cloners" used ISA cards and slots (Industry Standard Architecture) or EISA for higher performance. An IBM network card gave you a proprietary Token Ring port, which needed to be connected with Token Ring adapters-cables to Token Ring hubs called MAUs. Others use Ethernet, an industry standard. Same for memory expansion, which was mandatory given the miniscule amount on the system board, and these memory cards used proprietary slots for IBM, while others had ISA (later PCI, and other industry standard slots). .....To be continued below.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2017 at 23:10 UTC
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