gmarmot

gmarmot

Lives in United States New Mexico, United States
Works as a retired U.S. National Park Ranger
Joined on Apr 14, 2014
About me:

I spent 8 years traveling/backpacking in 20 third world countries in Central/South America and Asia from northwest China to Indonesia & west to Nepal/India. I am now in New Mexico and my wife and I will return to Asia next year. Worked as a photographer for the Washington State Fish & Game Department in the late 70s.

Comments

Total: 30, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

gmarmot: Being 9 days older than dirt, I've used extension tubes since the 1970's, with good non professional results. I realize that each lens reacts differently to the use of these.
With that in mind, my question is: I use MFT, own extension tubes now, and wonder if there is a large photo quality difference between this lens and extension tubes used with "normal non macro lenses" when photographing insects? It seems to me that insects are so variable in "depth" (ie: no lines are actually straight), that I wonder if there is a practical image quality difference between tubes and a dedicated macro lens?
Thoughts?

My tubes were a middle quality, and there are 3 different sizes; mix and match. This allows me to choose the ones that suit my shot. They also weigh less than a macro lens.

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2020 at 00:09 UTC
In reply to:

gmarmot: Being 9 days older than dirt, I've used extension tubes since the 1970's, with good non professional results. I realize that each lens reacts differently to the use of these.
With that in mind, my question is: I use MFT, own extension tubes now, and wonder if there is a large photo quality difference between this lens and extension tubes used with "normal non macro lenses" when photographing insects? It seems to me that insects are so variable in "depth" (ie: no lines are actually straight), that I wonder if there is a practical image quality difference between tubes and a dedicated macro lens?
Thoughts?

Yes. Years ago I also used these filters, and they worked. The difference might be that extra glass can cause distortion, especially if these filters are stacked. I certainly cannot say that this makes any practical difference for me(?).

Link | Posted on Aug 18, 2020 at 21:23 UTC

Being 9 days older than dirt, I've used extension tubes since the 1970's, with good non professional results. I realize that each lens reacts differently to the use of these.
With that in mind, my question is: I use MFT, own extension tubes now, and wonder if there is a large photo quality difference between this lens and extension tubes used with "normal non macro lenses" when photographing insects? It seems to me that insects are so variable in "depth" (ie: no lines are actually straight), that I wonder if there is a practical image quality difference between tubes and a dedicated macro lens?
Thoughts?

Link | Posted on Aug 18, 2020 at 20:52 UTC as 18th comment | 7 replies
In reply to:

lilBuddha: That was funny. Probably lost on much of the DPR demographic (cough grumpyoldbeepcough) though.

At 67 years sold, I completely agree. Lighten up
guys.

Link | Posted on Jan 1, 2020 at 17:14 UTC

I watched the original video by Bilie Eilish. This new one was great. Well done, Sir.

Link | Posted on Jan 1, 2020 at 17:12 UTC as 18th comment
In reply to:

Fotoni: Overexposed sky and they didn't level the camera properly for panorama rotation. Image processing probably used some kind of generic setting because of unnatural contast and/or black level. This is typical when shooting with default in-camera JPEG profiles.

I can't believe what kind of monkey process those images. There is big money right there, but it looks like some random person did first panorama with auto settings. Also dislike that panorama projection because it looks sooo unnatural. There is no clear visible "corners" when moving your eyes or rotating your head.

You really need to go to NASA and set them straight as to how stupid they are. I'm quite certain that you could do far better. Exactly when does your ship land ?

Link | Posted on Feb 18, 2019 at 08:40 UTC
In reply to:

webrunner5: They look happier than we do! No real surprise.

I've traveled for 8 years in 21 third world countries, and honestly believe that many people there ARE happier than the typical U.S. resident.

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2018 at 04:15 UTC
In reply to:

TonyPM: Who opened Pandora's box?
There are several opinions towards the police officers acts. The "far west" is long gone and sometimes I think the knowledge that some officers have about legal implications of the use of firearms isn't all that correct as it should be. Well some laws about the use of firearms aren't all the correct as they should be.
One of the most important parts of that training is knowing when you have to pull your gun out . I wasn't in that situation so I don't really know what went through that man's mind. What if that man really pulled out a hand gun or a rifle, but with no intention of causing harm to nobody? We wouldn't be talking about it.

The thing is you should know what you are going to shoot at, and why. If it looks like a gun is not enough, be sure it does look like one, and not only that, but be sure that persons intentions are harmful or ilegal.

Photokhan: I hope you are not saying that a law enforcement officer needs to wait to shoot if a person pulls out a visible gun, but has not yet fired. If you are saying that they must (or should) wait until the person actually shoots, you are absolutely wrong, and need to change the instruction of the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center. That is not something that ANY cop is required to do.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2018 at 04:28 UTC
In reply to:

gmarmot: As a retired Federal law enforcement officer, who was also a Federal firearms instructor for over 20 years, many of the comments here come from people having absolutely no experience with these matters.
Not being privy to exactly what occurred here, I’m not going to comment on this specific situation. You should not rush to judgement either.
There certainly are bad cops who shoot for the wrong reasons, however most police shootings are justified. Some police shootings happen because of odd circumstances. Example: A 12 year old has a toy gun in the dark, and points it at a cop and is shot and killed. Even if the cop knew the person was 12, that kid will kill you as dead as a 23 year old (has happened many times in the mideast wars/fiascos). That’s the reason I feel that toy guns should be outlawed.
Don’t forget that police are sometimes placed in impossible situations. All humans have a reaction time, and that can kill you.
If my comments bother you, call for disbanding all police.

One thing that I NEVER do is tell someone else what their beliefs are, as how the hell could I know without asking. You seem to have no problem doing exactly that. I have never been an NRA member, I want ALL gun sales to go through licensed dealers only, I would spend much more on the best gun checks available when any gun is purchased so that convicted felons and lunatics have less access to them. Accessories such as “bump stocks”, should not be legal. So, there’s your GUN NUT hypothesis shot to hell, gblatchford. I spent over 8 years in 20 third world countries in Central/South America and Asia after retirement. In these countries I could not carry a gun. No problem. Sorry, but your rant doesn’t accomplish much, does it.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2018 at 04:11 UTC

As a retired Federal law enforcement officer, who was also a Federal firearms instructor for over 20 years, many of the comments here come from people having absolutely no experience with these matters.
Not being privy to exactly what occurred here, I’m not going to comment on this specific situation. You should not rush to judgement either.
There certainly are bad cops who shoot for the wrong reasons, however most police shootings are justified. Some police shootings happen because of odd circumstances. Example: A 12 year old has a toy gun in the dark, and points it at a cop and is shot and killed. Even if the cop knew the person was 12, that kid will kill you as dead as a 23 year old (has happened many times in the mideast wars/fiascos). That’s the reason I feel that toy guns should be outlawed.
Don’t forget that police are sometimes placed in impossible situations. All humans have a reaction time, and that can kill you.
If my comments bother you, call for disbanding all police.

Link | Posted on Dec 26, 2017 at 04:42 UTC as 10th comment | 3 replies
On article Best cameras for travel in 2020 (321 comments in total)
In reply to:

james s. kennedy: With a few mods, the Penny ZS100 could be the best always carry camera. Grippable surface, tlltale LCD, larger EVF, F1.8 Lens, hot shoe, mic input. It is my favorite right now. I have aged out of large DSLRs, and even my a6500 is a big load if you carry a bunch of lenses. Maybe I should get a burro.

I agree. I’ll still travel for months in third world countries, but not carrying a huge load. The pictures are important, but so is my sanity.

Link | Posted on Nov 30, 2017 at 06:22 UTC
On article Best cameras for travel in 2020 (321 comments in total)
In reply to:

Lusis100: A smartphone is your best traveling hardware

C’mon, are you seriously suggesting that everyone who travels carry a smartphone as the camera? If so, that’s like I’ve heard another tell me that the only serious camera for travel is full frame. Neither is reasonable for me.

Link | Posted on Nov 30, 2017 at 05:46 UTC
On photo Nepal- Annapurna Mountain range in dharmagreg's photo gallery (2 comments in total)

I like your Nepal-Annapurna Mountain Range shot. My wife and I backpacked around much of the Annapurna route 4 years ago. Just before we left, we stayed in the town of Pokhara, and went up a small mountain near the city where they hang glide from. The view looking north from the top looked a lot like the valley in your picture. Perhaps not, but its very similar.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2016 at 08:55 UTC as 1st comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

dharmagreg: I recently spent 12 months climbing/trekking travelling through Tibet, Nepal, Bhutan, India and most of SE Asia. The camera with me was my EM-1. It may not have the best image quality perhaps, but it never failed me in the most extreme conditions you could put a camera through. That is why I will choose the Mk 11 when it is available.

btw- some images of that trip are in my gallery all shot with the EM-1 if you are interested.

I have an EM5II that I carried for about 6 months in humid/wet weather conditions in many areas of southeast Asia (Thailand, Cambodia, and Sumatra, Indonesia). This camera went into cities, as well as backpacking in jungles, near the ocean, and wet mountains there, mostly in hot conditions. So far I've experienced no problems with it.
Of course my wife, born in Thailand, says that the area has a warm season and a cool season. Garbage, I say that the area does have 2 seasons: hot and hotter.

Link | Posted on Dec 14, 2016 at 08:45 UTC

C'mon folks, give DP a break for showing this. I know exactly how this water jet works, and still found it interesting. I suppose that I could complain whenever a camera of a brand that wasn't mine was tested for photo use, but that would obviously be silly. This is large website with lots of information; if you don't want to see something, don't watch, or perhaps I missed a clause here that forced you to see this?

Link | Posted on Nov 20, 2016 at 16:50 UTC as 3rd comment

I realize that there is, and has been, controversy about using filters for protection. While I have bent 2 lens filter mounts in 40 years of carrying cameras in inhospitable places in the Americas and Asia (deserts, oceans, jungle, cities) my reason for using them has to do with surface damage and/or cleaning. I just don't feel that I wouldn't end up scratching the actual lens rather than the filter. I have destroyed two highest quality B+W filters surface (at least damaged the surface enough that I replaced them) through accidental surface damage. Although replacing the front lens elements would have been no more expensive than buying all those filters, I simply couldn't replace them in my locations. Or, perhaps I'm just a klutz, of which I've been accused of several times.

Link | Posted on Jan 28, 2016 at 18:35 UTC as 2nd comment
On article Art Wolfe: Swimming with the Humpbacks, Tonga, 2013 (78 comments in total)
In reply to:

xiao fei: Why don't other countries let you in the water with whales? Is it a "protect the wildlife" thing or a "for your own protection" thing?

I agree completely concerning humans destroying much of nature. I retired ASAP and traveled for nearly 7 years in Central/South America and Asia the cheap way (as my money doesn't equal my time). Have seen some very remote areas, and often a lot of destruction. Always carrying a snorkel/mask, I'd jump in the water anywhere where it was warm enough to tolerate. What I saw off the coasts of Central America and Southeast Asia + India is very heartbreaking. Coral destruction ranging up to 100%. Off of Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia from Flores to Sumatra, Myanmar, and India, I saw huge areas that had mostly dead coral with a few dazed fish swimming over it. As our projected world population in 2100 is now 11 billion, things don't look good. We seem to be very good at saving lives via advanced medical technology, and very bad at birth control.
Enough of my rant though. At least there are some places that look fairly pristine, and I hope governments can manage to maintain

Link | Posted on Sep 20, 2015 at 17:35 UTC
In reply to:

rwdigital: Don't waste your money on this camera with this tiny sensor, remember guys, 1” sensor is 4x the size of the 1.2/3” sensor, so that means you gathering 4 times the light over this cameras (FZ200/FZ300), and if it’s a BSI sensor, that double the light sensitivity. So you pay for a camera like the new Sony RX10 mk-II which has 1” sensor (or the The FZ1000 but has no BSI sensor), that gather 4x more light than the FZ200/FZ300 but you will not pay 4x more for that low light capability, you will only pay twice the price on the RX10 II or few hundreds on the FZ1000.

I'm not sure how other people use their cameras, but as a person who actually carries a camera traveling, the weight difference alone would kill it for me, not even speaking of size and price. I do see travelers carrying full frame cameras with 2 or 3 lenses, but I'm sure not going to do it.

Link | Posted on Aug 17, 2015 at 18:51 UTC
In reply to:

Macist: What i need to know is that the DMC-FZ300 doesn't have GPS.

This should automatically disqualify it as a travel camera in 2015.

Perhaps I'm behind the times, but having traveled to 21 third world countries for well over 6 years (recently) in Central/South America and Asia some of it backpacking in remote areas, being a retired NPS and BLM ranger, and being familiar with GPS, I find (for me) no normal use for GPS esp on a camera. Yes, it could be useful if you take so many pics that you cannot remember where they were taken, but with its battery draining feature, I wouldn't use it (and don't use it on an inexpensive underwater camera that I also carry in addition to a larger camera).

Link | Posted on Aug 17, 2015 at 18:15 UTC
On article Shooting with the Canon PowerShot G3 X (318 comments in total)
In reply to:

GT500M: Well the main reason I would consider this and other superzooms is for the focal length range. Try capturing Red Parrots high up in the trees in Costa Rica with a 200mm equivalent focal length. I just managed it with a Sony HX400 though the results were very grainy on an overcast day.

I have an A7r and the cost, size and weight of long lenses for such a system mean I like to complement it with a decent bridge or superzoom which I am on the lookout for again....

I love the RX10 but its' reach at the long end makes it less than a total travel all-rounder.

The Canon is on my list and I would get the viewfinder as I can't shoot using the LCD only.

nicoboston: that Luminous Landscape review is impressive. I'd say teh G3X looks ideal for me to audition as my next travel compact (ish) camera....

After trying a few variations of several manufacturers bodies/lenses, I came to a similar conclusion & bought an EM5II with 12-50 and 75-300 lenses. Traveling for months at a time through various weather conditions in third world countries, this was about my limit of carry of weight/size. Faster lenses would be nice, but the weight is not. I'm surprised at how sharp slow shutter speeds are with several cameras.
There's so many camera combinations out there, that the decision was tough.

Link | Posted on Aug 2, 2015 at 21:36 UTC
Total: 30, showing: 1 – 20
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