Bob Janes

Lives in United Kingdom London, United Kingdom
Joined on Dec 27, 2001

Comments

Total: 64, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Gediminas 8: Some people quoted in the article have the cheekiness - or is it plain stupidity? - to complain that they can no longer host their 'years worth' of blog content. If you are smart enough to keep a personal/business blog for years, maybe learn to host your data yourself instead of leeching off others?

Ahem! I have been paying them a subscription for six years and they have made this change when I still have six months of my subscription to run - but it isn't going to be what I paid for any more - that is why I'm complaining.

Link | Posted on Jul 5, 2017 at 00:06 UTC
In reply to:

tkbslc: I'm confused. I logged into my photo bucket account, and it works fine. I also saw no option for a paid account on their home page. Maybe this is just targeting abusers with huge traffic with direct embeds and no ad hits?

No, mine is the normal plan, but it still works at present.

Link | Posted on Jul 4, 2017 at 20:48 UTC
In reply to:

tkbslc: I'm confused. I logged into my photo bucket account, and it works fine. I also saw no option for a paid account on their home page. Maybe this is just targeting abusers with huge traffic with direct embeds and no ad hits?

Their new T&Cs suggest that only people on the top plan will be able to hotlink, and although my 20Plus plan still hotlinks at present but the information sugegsts it will stop soon.

Link | Posted on Jul 4, 2017 at 19:05 UTC
In reply to:

T Olivier: I see what Photobucket did in slightly different way than most of those who already commented here.
To understand my point of view, let's take an example of motor vehicle industry, the people who drive the cars and roads the cars are being driven on.
The car producers are the web service providers where the main presentation website is located (here, the author mentions PetaPixel), the car drivers are the users who use the PetaPixel website to link the pictures they host on Photobucket. The State (central/federal/local/State/Provincial etc.) who builds, maintains and ultimately pays for the roads people drive their cars on is Photobucket.
Photobucket just realized that they were providing the most expensive part of this combination for free. This is just as if the State was expected to never raise any money for roads via taxation but, was required to provide excellent quality of roads and ever expanding capacity to accommodate more and more new cars.

But why try to squeeze their low-use subscribers as well as getting rid of the free ride (which is often a good way of reeling in subscribers to the budget plans when they get near to the limits for the free accounts)?

I've been paying for 20GB for the last 6 years, of which I've never gone beyond 14GB - they are bringing in this restriction (which makes the way I use their service impossible) mid-way thorugh my subscription year. At the moment my third-party links still work, but if they stop before December I'll be wanting a refund, because I haven't got the service I signed up to.

Link | Posted on Jul 4, 2017 at 10:56 UTC

I have used Photobucket for a number of years, a couple of free accounts plus a paid one for about the last 6 years. I've always liked the way they made it easy to get an image and thumbnail code for third party posting, but from the looks of things I'm going to need to get an account that has 20 times the capacity and costs 10 times as much in order to keep with them.

I've sent them an email politely cancelling my subscription from December and am now looking for something that fits my needs better.

Apologies to all those people I reccomended to use Photobucket over the years...

Link | Posted on Jul 4, 2017 at 10:31 UTC as 27th comment
On article Sony a9 Full Review: Mirrorless Redefined (2726 comments in total)
In reply to:

cavensar: Speaking of auto focus - try bees or insects on flowers. Small object, fast moving, lots of BSG - bright shiny background. Also try birds in flight especially larger ones like herons coming in to land on their nest, or water birds landing, taking off. For birds one sometimes has to go to APS-C to force a teleconverter even with a 400mm lens.
The plus to the A9 is the high frame rate, no black-out, silent shooting, very high shutter speeds. Joy stick for moving the focus point. Buy lots of storage. grin Yes, there is more of a learning curve with the A9 especially for auto focus.
As HenryDJP notes, Sony keeps doing "Sony, what were you thinking?? stuff" USB 2 - not everyone has a 1 gb portable hub and a laptop with a network port. Single UHS II - when one has cards in both slots the buffer unload crawls to UHS I speed. Still overheating for video. Memory stick still supported - almost like the modern tractors with steel wheels one sees the Central NY Mennonites using.

You don't need a portable hub - a mirrored eithernet cable should allow you to connect the two devices and get them communicating.

Link | Posted on Jun 18, 2017 at 11:40 UTC
In reply to:

Linerider: Err, there are thousands of respectable lightroom tutorials.
I didnt find anything mind blowing or new. Its just the basics.
Why has Dpreview chosen to promote this site?

@Linerider: what do you think they are promoting? PHlearn do not appear to be selling anything, it seems a little cynical to assume an ulterior motive.

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2017 at 05:11 UTC
In reply to:

Linerider: Err, there are thousands of respectable lightroom tutorials.
I didnt find anything mind blowing or new. Its just the basics.
Why has Dpreview chosen to promote this site?

However, other than lightroom, not a lot of products were mentioned, so maybe there is no big ulterior motive? Good little tutorial, kudos to DPR for bringing it to our attentions.

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2017 at 16:46 UTC
On article Analog gems: 10 excellent, affordable film cameras (828 comments in total)

A while ago, my Dad was reminicing about being in a REME workshop during the Korean war - they used to get Super Ikontas in for repair...

I decided to look around for a copy and eventually found one with an f/2.8 lens shooting 6x6 that I managed to win on ebay for just over £50. It was in good condition (well I had to run a film thourgh to check didn't I?) and was quite fun to shoot with.

Just a few years on and the prices seem to have sky-rocketed..

Link | Posted on May 20, 2017 at 18:54 UTC as 286th comment
On article Analog gems: 10 excellent, affordable film cameras (828 comments in total)

..oh and possibly about as advanced as any 35mm SLR ever got, the Minolta Dynax/Maxxum/Alpha 7..

Link | Posted on May 20, 2017 at 10:55 UTC as 405th comment
On article Analog gems: 10 excellent, affordable film cameras (828 comments in total)

OM1 is great, as is Minox 35, don't forget the Olympus Trip either...

Other rangefinders to consider are: Minolta HiMatic 7sii, Konica Auto S3 (the last two very nearly the same camera, but with different lenses) and a bunch of those old Yashicas...

Link | Posted on May 20, 2017 at 10:54 UTC as 406th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Frank_BR: Nikon is a notoriously difficult company to deal with. Who does not know, for example, the compatibility problems that Sigma has faced in their lenses for Nikon cameras? Nikon leaves real booby traps hidden in the software for communication between cameras and lenses, so whenever Nikon launches a new camera, Sigma engineers have nightmares because Sigma lenses may suddenly stop working with the new Nikon camera. To counteract such Nikon tricks, Sigma launched the Sigma USB dock that allows easy firmware update of its lenses.

Now Nikon fights with ASML and Zeiss is a battle of giants. If Nikon misses, bye, bye Nikon.

The whole E mount spec is available from Sony for commercial bodies on request. Sigma produced a few direct E mount lenses early on, but not much since, but a lot of smart adapter makers have used this facility, so Sony gets adapters to other mounts on the market without being responsible for whether the other end of the adapter works fully. It is an unusual, but quite innovative strategy, which suggests they see as much if not more profit in camera bodies than in lenses.

Link | Posted on May 1, 2017 at 08:44 UTC
In reply to:

Bob Janes: There are lots of A mount shooters still using the a900 and a850.. the viewfinder is about as good as you can get for an optical finder..

.. As old as it is, over 11% of current Dyxum subscribers list the a900/850 as their 'primary' camera

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2017 at 12:23 UTC

There are lots of A mount shooters still using the a900 and a850.. the viewfinder is about as good as you can get for an optical finder..

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2017 at 12:19 UTC as 83rd comment | 2 replies

Seems ridiculous that US carriers are not affected: does the intel suggest that terrorists would not fly a US carrier?

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2017 at 20:35 UTC as 61st comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

mxx: Ah, DPR giving a little help to boost the ailing Nikon's sales. Hope it helps.

@Zdman: I think most people realise that no-one is truly objective - we all bring our baggage/experience with us... I don't see anything insidious in this article, just someone saying that it can be/has potential to be a really useful tool.

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2017 at 10:37 UTC
In reply to:

mxx: Ah, DPR giving a little help to boost the ailing Nikon's sales. Hope it helps.

Did you not read that second-to-last paragraph of the article?

"But if you're not a Nikonian, don't fret! Almost every major consumer camera manufacturer has subject tracking in some form. Panasonic's tracking system works reliably well, in both rugby and in social situations. Sony's Eye AF feature is truly amazing. Olympus' C-AF + Tracking is fairly robust, and Canon's Dual Pixel AF is probably the best face detection and recognition system out there."

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2017 at 22:30 UTC
In reply to:

Photomonkey: As a long time Canon user I have to agree their AF tracking leaves a lot to be desired.
Never has it live up to its reputation for accurate AF. Fast yes; and for the most part accurate.
But try following tennis or volleyball and you are hosed.

I would point out that Canon are investing in subject tracking technology as well - because they realise that if someone else nails it, and if they don't - the pro sport shooters might well be shooting something else...

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2017 at 22:27 UTC
In reply to:

Photomonkey: As a long time Canon user I have to agree their AF tracking leaves a lot to be desired.
Never has it live up to its reputation for accurate AF. Fast yes; and for the most part accurate.
But try following tennis or volleyball and you are hosed.

But as a long-time user, you might not be using their latest stuff (or you might be, in which case I apologise for suggesting otherwise...)

But this is one reason why manufacturers (all of them) are interested in the technology - they can see the use if it works well, and if it does it is another reason you might choose to upgrade.

Technology does get better: I treated myself to a Minolta 9000AF a few years ago. Fantastically built camera, and the first pro-build AF 35mm camera, but the AF was pants, despite being state of the art... No-one would have relied on the 9000AF's AF... but only a few years on the technology had improved - and it will for subject tracking too.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2017 at 22:00 UTC
In reply to:

fedway: Ironic: the title pompously states, "it should matter to you." Yet, subject tracking only really matters depending on what subjects matter to you. Some of us couldn't care less about shooting weddings, hyperactive children moving around, BIF or sports. All the bandwidth spent on the topic is because of the technical geekiness factor not necessarily due to it's over-all relevance to many people.

So really, you don't even need AF...

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2017 at 21:55 UTC
Total: 64, showing: 1 – 20
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