tar4heel2

Lives in United States Fresno, CA, United States
Works as a Photographer
Has a website at http://philhawkinsphoto.com
Joined on Jul 9, 2005

Comments

Total: 53, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Sony a7S III initial review (1592 comments in total)
In reply to:

FujifilmXT3: $3500 for a 12 megapixel camera LOL

Yeah, I agree, they should have just made a video camera instead of putting a video camera in a still-camera disguise. But I'm guessing that's going to be the cleanest 12mp image you'll get anywhere!

Link | Posted on Jul 30, 2020 at 16:42 UTC
In reply to:

ZeBebito: “I imagine, in two or three years, some users who bought mirrorless cameras will return to DSLRs”

Did he graduated from the Kodak Business school?

"Did he graduated from the..." Seriously?

Link | Posted on May 31, 2019 at 15:01 UTC
In reply to:

J2Gphoto: I would NEVER....... EVER! go back to a DSLR.

I'm curious; why?

Link | Posted on May 31, 2019 at 14:59 UTC

Get some new lenses for the 645Z, maybe launch an update to that camera... Maybe a 16-bit version? We really need a long lens, longer than 400mm.

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2019 at 20:08 UTC as 42nd comment
In reply to:

GrizzlyAK: Yeah, never again. I bought an Epson 4800, and it's sitting here unused because you have to use it constantly or the heads clog (badly), and it takes LOTS of ink to clean the heads. You can't tell it to clean a particular jet, but it wastes ink out of all of them to clean one clogged jet. About $800 to replace all the 110 ml cartridges. I've used about $100 worth of ink cleaning the heads before, because running a 'deep' clean uses nearly 1/2 of all cartridges (or about $400). What a waste of time and money. When they work, they work well, but not for the hobbyist. If you have a print shop, go for it, but if you are like me and think it would be a good idea to buy one just to have ultimate control, think twice. The only control you have is wasting your hard-earned money on the most precious, costliest-per-ounce, ridiculously inflated priced fluid on the planet.

I agree that ink is far too expensive. Unfortunately, that's how they make their money. But if your heads are that clogged, don't fix it by running the unclog procedure; saturate a stack of paper towels with ink cleaning solvent for several days. REALLY saturate your paper towels, almost to dripping, lay the towels on the area where the ink deposits on the paper, and slide the carriage over and let it sit there for 3 days. THEN run the unclog, and you should be good to go. If not, repeat until you unclog them.

Link | Posted on Aug 31, 2018 at 18:33 UTC
On article Nikon Z7 Review (4475 comments in total)

...yawn...

Link | Posted on Aug 25, 2018 at 19:24 UTC as 737th comment
In reply to:

tar4heel2: This is huge. SiOnyx is developing a new sensor technology called "Black Silicon", in which the surface of the wafer, instead of being flat, has a surface that, when observed under a microscope, appears to be made of stalactites.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_silicon

Think of a cars' air filter in which the filter element is accordion-shaped increasing the airflow surface area. Tiny little peaks, shaped like needles, increase the light-gathering surface area by a factor of ten, thus creating more photon signal per-square-micron that a typical sensor. This is only going to get better.

See above: "The Aurora uses a 1in sensor with 0.9 million large pixels that are created using what the company describes as a proprietary laser process. The process creates ‘the ultimate light-trapping pixels’ that have increased quantum efficiency and so avoid excessive noise and restricted dynamic range while producing images 10x brighter than a standard CMOS sensor."

and

"The pixels have extended sensitivity to light between 850 and 940nm in the near-infrared area of the spectrum, and a maximum ANSI of 820,000 - and so can produce viewable images even in what would appear to the human eye to be darkness."

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2018 at 13:44 UTC
In reply to:

tar4heel2: This is huge. SiOnyx is developing a new sensor technology called "Black Silicon", in which the surface of the wafer, instead of being flat, has a surface that, when observed under a microscope, appears to be made of stalactites.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_silicon

Think of a cars' air filter in which the filter element is accordion-shaped increasing the airflow surface area. Tiny little peaks, shaped like needles, increase the light-gathering surface area by a factor of ten, thus creating more photon signal per-square-micron that a typical sensor. This is only going to get better.

Black silicon was invented by accident by Professor Eric Mazur and Dr. James Carey of Harvard University over Christmas break when the two were fooling around at Harvard's silicon etching lab. As the story goes, they were experimenting with various etching electrical currents, a certain gas was accidentally released into the vacuum chamber when the current was applied and the result was a crude form of black silicon which displayed unexpected increases in the absorption rates of both the visible and infrared (hence night-vision) wavelengths. These two also founded SiOnyx, buying the rights to the technology from Harvard.

This phenomenon exist in nature in a moth's eye, the retina contains similar pillars that reduce reflectivity to 1 to 2%.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2018 at 13:26 UTC
In reply to:

tar4heel2: This is huge. SiOnyx is developing a new sensor technology called "Black Silicon", in which the surface of the wafer, instead of being flat, has a surface that, when observed under a microscope, appears to be made of stalactites.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_silicon

Think of a cars' air filter in which the filter element is accordion-shaped increasing the airflow surface area. Tiny little peaks, shaped like needles, increase the light-gathering surface area by a factor of ten, thus creating more photon signal per-square-micron that a typical sensor. This is only going to get better.

The problem so far in applying this technology to commercial applications has been the difficulty in getting the new black silicon surface to attach to the substrate in a manner that can withstand handling during normal use. SiOnyx has been working on this for 10 years and may finally found the answer with this low-light camera.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2018 at 13:06 UTC
In reply to:

tar4heel2: This is huge. SiOnyx is developing a new sensor technology called "Black Silicon", in which the surface of the wafer, instead of being flat, has a surface that, when observed under a microscope, appears to be made of stalactites.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_silicon

Think of a cars' air filter in which the filter element is accordion-shaped increasing the airflow surface area. Tiny little peaks, shaped like needles, increase the light-gathering surface area by a factor of ten, thus creating more photon signal per-square-micron that a typical sensor. This is only going to get better.

From Wikipedia: "The sensitivity of black silicon detectors is 100–500 times higher than that of untreated silicon (conventional silicon), in both the visible and infrared spectra."

and

Also from Wikipedia: "Black silicon is a needle-shaped surface structure where needles are made of single-crystal silicon and have a height above 10 µm and diameter less than 1 µm.[2] Its main feature is an increased absorption of incident light—the high reflectivity of the silicon, which is usually 20–30% for quasi-normal incidence, is reduced to about 5%. This is due to the formation of a so-called effective medium[4] by the needles. Within this medium, there is no sharp interface, but a continuous change of the refractive index that reduces Fresnel reflection. When the depth of the graded layer is roughly equal to the wavelength of light in silicon (about one-quarter the wavelength in vacuum) the reflection is reduced to 5%; deeper grades produce even blacker silicon."

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2018 at 13:00 UTC
In reply to:

ovatab: "proprietary laser process", "quantum efficiency" and "military-grade" - sounds like a shop tv

Guys, look up "Black Silicon" for an explanation of what this is and what it means. The technology has been used in military, medical, solar, scientific and astronomy for years. With this technology exposure to x-rays can be reduced exponentially virtually eliminating radiation damage. The new orbital telescope to replace Hubble will use this technology, increasing the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor of 3. Keep up with this, it is serious and treat this camera like the first digital SLR; a peak at the future of digital imaging. One day we will be using black silicon DSLRs enabling night shooting at 100 ISO hand-held.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_silicon

Link | Posted on Jul 29, 2018 at 19:44 UTC

This is huge. SiOnyx is developing a new sensor technology called "Black Silicon", in which the surface of the wafer, instead of being flat, has a surface that, when observed under a microscope, appears to be made of stalactites.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_silicon

Think of a cars' air filter in which the filter element is accordion-shaped increasing the airflow surface area. Tiny little peaks, shaped like needles, increase the light-gathering surface area by a factor of ten, thus creating more photon signal per-square-micron that a typical sensor. This is only going to get better.

Link | Posted on Jul 29, 2018 at 19:37 UTC as 5th comment | 6 replies

I vote medium format or pixel-shift.

Link | Posted on Jul 27, 2018 at 15:37 UTC as 64th comment | 3 replies
On article Best cameras for landscapes in 2020 (1125 comments in total)

How does the Pentax 645Z not make this list??? So much for DPReview credibility.

Link | Posted on Jul 10, 2018 at 13:49 UTC as 255th comment | 1 reply

Nothing has changed. First image I loaded in the new version--a 16-bit TIF--it crashed.

Loaded a RAW file from my Pentax 645Z and it was lightning fast!! But, I still have problems with pink areas of RAW files from a 645Z.

It should not be crashing when opening TIF files.

Link | Posted on Jun 26, 2018 at 14:20 UTC as 7th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

burkek: Wish they hadn't sunk money/resources into that clunky ONE camera. PhotoLab development is slow, slow, slow compared to other tools. This was bound to happen. I love and use Photolab, but it just can't complete with Lightroom, and arguably some of the others.

I export as a 16-bit TIF and complete those adjustments I cannot do in DxO; dynamic range balancing using layers and output re-sizing. The resizing is done with actions.

Link | Posted on Jun 1, 2018 at 14:23 UTC
In reply to:

burkek: Wish they hadn't sunk money/resources into that clunky ONE camera. PhotoLab development is slow, slow, slow compared to other tools. This was bound to happen. I love and use Photolab, but it just can't complete with Lightroom, and arguably some of the others.

Not being adversarial with you, I respectfully do not understand how Photolab does not compete with Lightroom.

In my experience, DxO streamlines RAW conversion processes like no other software. I can download, open DxO, cull, crop, color balance, remove noise, convert, etc. 750 images in an hour.

Let's say you adjust the brightness on an image in DxO, the noise reduction function re-adjusts based on the new noise levels. Other programs do automatic noise reduction, but it's an adjustment that's exactly the same for every image regardless of the content and structure of the image. DxO re-reads the noise in the resulting adjustment and AUTOMATICALLY re-adjusts noise based on that brightness adjustment. I'm not sure how you can do better than that!! I can't live without DxO.

That said, I do admit that Lightroom's color adjustments are far superior to DxO. Color adjustment is Lightroom's advantage, but in every other measure, DxO is indispensable, at least for me.

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2018 at 14:24 UTC
On article Best cameras for landscapes in 2020 (1125 comments in total)

No love for the Pentax 645Z?

Link | Posted on Apr 8, 2018 at 19:11 UTC as 263rd comment
In reply to:

milkod2001: CaptureOne looks more and more attractive now.

As does DxO Photolab. And no catalogs!!

Link | Posted on Mar 15, 2018 at 16:42 UTC
In reply to:

EDWARD ARTISTE: If there's one thing for sure, Camera RAW needs competition.

It is the engine that is unmatched by anyone else, in terms of an ecosystem (Bridge-->RAW/Lightroom-->Photoshop).

If not, Adobe will have everyone by the nuts for a very long time. All of these other developers may be wise to jumpstart an imaging consortium and create a standard (that works as a plugin for all major apps) to do battle with adobe.

No thanks.

Don't forget DxO Photolab, which is much better at processing large volume and has the BEST noise reduction algorithm.

Link | Posted on Mar 15, 2018 at 16:40 UTC
Total: 53, showing: 1 – 20
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