SRHEdD

Lives in United States Viera, FL, United States
Works as a Art Director
Joined on Apr 15, 2011

Comments

Total: 68, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

grock: When traveling with a small child, I sometimes don't have the luxury of carrying all my camera gear on my person, and we always have to check a bag anyway, so I've taken to keeping my camera body and any L-lenses in my backpack, and stuff the smaller/cheaper primes in my camera bag with my socks and other clothes and putting that in the middle of the big, hard suitcase. Hopefully it's heavy enough that it's tougher to toss...
That said, i would NEVER EVER put $18k worth of gear in a checked bag. That is just lunacy. You could've just bought your camera first class seat and saved $8000.

I'd check my kid before my cameras... unless he fit under the seat.

Link | Posted on Aug 18, 2017 at 20:11 UTC
In reply to:

gumanow: TSA is going to start making photographers check in their cameras gear. They won't allow the electronics on planes in the near future.

I've always put my Domke on the belt and open in a tray. Why wait? Speeds up the process regardless. If you use a Domke you learn how to re-buckle on the run.

Link | Posted on Aug 18, 2017 at 20:09 UTC
In reply to:

Kostas L: The Olympus TG-5 is the best rugged compact you can buy right now, because it is the only new rugged compact you can buy right now.

I have two Nikon AWs, an AW100 and an AW120. Each were $60 in perfect condition from local pawn shops. Good enough, cheap enough, capable enough, low investment, sand never an issue. I throw it into our pool when my boys and their friends jump in, take it to the beach, and keep one in my DSLR bag in case their lacrosse tournaments get a bout of really nasty weather. Even the video is acceptable. You can overthink these cameras, and under use them because they cost too much. Check your local pawn shops regularly.

Link | Posted on Jul 8, 2017 at 16:50 UTC

Years ago, Roy Scheider made a movie in which he was a reporter interviewing a death-row dude. He took a camera into the cell for photographs. The rewind knob never turned, and it made motor drive sounds when he shot even though it didn't have a drive attached. I'd like to see a horror movie where the ghouls attack all the inept foleys in the world... silently.

Link | Posted on Jul 1, 2017 at 00:46 UTC as 77th comment
On article Sony a9: more speed, less dynamic range (666 comments in total)
In reply to:

SRHEdD: A good read, and it could impact practical everyday use.

Now, tell me the processor(s) are so well updated from the A7RII that the shutter lag with flash is gone. I'm not talking about full manual control of the camera and lights, but the TTL use of flashes and most specifically when their wireless transmitter and receiver are used. With the A7RII, the shutter delay is intolerable with the wireless kit, and barely manageable with the flash on camera. I've been told it is because the exposure process includes closing the shutter, taking reading from a pre-flash, then opening and closing the shutter for exposure and finally re-opening the shutter for viewing. That process is not processor friendly and is slow compared to a DSLR. Regardless of if I have that process correct, it is painfully slow to the point of missing that instant of a great expression or other action. Fix THAT and I'll buy it. My A7RII is on the bubble right now because my Nikons react MUCH faster with wireless flash.

See? Herein lies my problem. Address the things you FIXED before you tell me about new things you've added. No one wants to address the TTL flash/shutter lag. If it HAD been neutralized by the new processors' speed, they'd be quick to say so. Without addressing the flaw, I as a consumer will assume it still exists, and spend my money on a highly discounted D810 instead.

Link | Posted on May 22, 2017 at 20:22 UTC
On article Sony a9: more speed, less dynamic range (666 comments in total)

A good read, and it could impact practical everyday use.

Now, tell me the processor(s) are so well updated from the A7RII that the shutter lag with flash is gone. I'm not talking about full manual control of the camera and lights, but the TTL use of flashes and most specifically when their wireless transmitter and receiver are used. With the A7RII, the shutter delay is intolerable with the wireless kit, and barely manageable with the flash on camera. I've been told it is because the exposure process includes closing the shutter, taking reading from a pre-flash, then opening and closing the shutter for exposure and finally re-opening the shutter for viewing. That process is not processor friendly and is slow compared to a DSLR. Regardless of if I have that process correct, it is painfully slow to the point of missing that instant of a great expression or other action. Fix THAT and I'll buy it. My A7RII is on the bubble right now because my Nikons react MUCH faster with wireless flash.

Link | Posted on May 22, 2017 at 12:28 UTC as 30th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

SRHEdD: If the shutter release lag on TTL flash shooting is gone, I'm in. The A7RII has a nasty lag when using their flashes on-body, and with their own wireless transmitter/receiver kit. I'm told that since the "shutter" is always open, it has to focus, close, fire a pre-flash, measure, open for the shot, close to end the shot, and then open again. There is no setting to stop this except for full manual flash shooting. My D750 is much faster in i-TTL use. I can't trust the A7RII to capture fleeting expressions on faces in group photos when TTL flash is used. Is THAT fixed now? It would seem to be, but I'm not buying until I see it with my own eyes.

I may have that sequence off, but you get the idea. The process is too slow compared to a DSLR.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 12:52 UTC

If the shutter release lag on TTL flash shooting is gone, I'm in. The A7RII has a nasty lag when using their flashes on-body, and with their own wireless transmitter/receiver kit. I'm told that since the "shutter" is always open, it has to focus, close, fire a pre-flash, measure, open for the shot, close to end the shot, and then open again. There is no setting to stop this except for full manual flash shooting. My D750 is much faster in i-TTL use. I can't trust the A7RII to capture fleeting expressions on faces in group photos when TTL flash is used. Is THAT fixed now? It would seem to be, but I'm not buying until I see it with my own eyes.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 12:35 UTC as 17th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

SRHEdD: I control my camera. It focuses when and where I choose. It shoots at the shutter speed and aperture I choose. I will allow the camera to follow my chosen shutter speed with an aperture, or vice versa when one is more important to me than the other. I buy based on build quality and the quickness with which I can control the camera, and how quickly the camera responds. I don't think a painter would buy a brush that only paints where it's processor decides paint should go, or an illustrator a pen that draws for itself. I've recently purchased a Nikon D500 for its speed. I lock the center AF point on first. In shooting two lacrosse games, at 10fps I have few shots that were not exactly what I intended to capture. I hate that I have to PAY for these extra features I'll never use and that they run up the cost of the body. I'd suggest a NEW, cheaper Nikon with the same D500 sensor, body, drive, AF, PSAM, and metering, stripped of the rest. Less computer, more camera. A 21st century Nikon FE.

Oh I'm sure. It is just a shame the purists aren't a more vocal and more buying group to garner consideration. I'd love that digital Nikon FE. Single shot unless you added a battery grip, 3 metering modes, PSAM shutter speed dial, ISO dial, AF-S/AF-C only. Center area of cross-type AF points. DOF preview. Round, high eye-point finder with curtain. All metal and weather sealed. Single XQD to keep it small, but dual if possible. LCD on top like Nikon Df, and lighted rear buttons like the D500. Less prominent grip unless bigger grip is added, then 5-8fps. No WiFi, no SnapBridge, no NFC. Full frame or APS-C. I'd buy either, or both.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2017 at 18:54 UTC
In reply to:

SRHEdD: I control my camera. It focuses when and where I choose. It shoots at the shutter speed and aperture I choose. I will allow the camera to follow my chosen shutter speed with an aperture, or vice versa when one is more important to me than the other. I buy based on build quality and the quickness with which I can control the camera, and how quickly the camera responds. I don't think a painter would buy a brush that only paints where it's processor decides paint should go, or an illustrator a pen that draws for itself. I've recently purchased a Nikon D500 for its speed. I lock the center AF point on first. In shooting two lacrosse games, at 10fps I have few shots that were not exactly what I intended to capture. I hate that I have to PAY for these extra features I'll never use and that they run up the cost of the body. I'd suggest a NEW, cheaper Nikon with the same D500 sensor, body, drive, AF, PSAM, and metering, stripped of the rest. Less computer, more camera. A 21st century Nikon FE.

I don't realistically think it would cost less. But when the Nikon range is roughly $379 to $6499, there should be room for a more pure camera, even if it lives at the higher end of that scale. When I shot film with a Nikon F5, the next pocket over in my bag always held an FM-2 body. That is the contrast in equipment that is missing these days. I've no problem with the automation discussed in this article for those who think they need it or want it, but the entire product line shouldn't be based on processing power and automation. Chevy makes trucks and Corvettes, MB makes diesel sedans and AMG rockets. My favorite restaurant has a sublime salmon but also a kids' menu. In my case, I wish Nikon would cater to those of us professionals who want a well built, fast tool, not a computer with a lens attached (though I'd likely buy both).

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2017 at 17:46 UTC

I control my camera. It focuses when and where I choose. It shoots at the shutter speed and aperture I choose. I will allow the camera to follow my chosen shutter speed with an aperture, or vice versa when one is more important to me than the other. I buy based on build quality and the quickness with which I can control the camera, and how quickly the camera responds. I don't think a painter would buy a brush that only paints where it's processor decides paint should go, or an illustrator a pen that draws for itself. I've recently purchased a Nikon D500 for its speed. I lock the center AF point on first. In shooting two lacrosse games, at 10fps I have few shots that were not exactly what I intended to capture. I hate that I have to PAY for these extra features I'll never use and that they run up the cost of the body. I'd suggest a NEW, cheaper Nikon with the same D500 sensor, body, drive, AF, PSAM, and metering, stripped of the rest. Less computer, more camera. A 21st century Nikon FE.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2017 at 12:49 UTC as 55th comment | 9 replies
In reply to:

Albert Valentino: "...ordered to perform community service for Yellowstone Forever." That seems strange as this punisment seems overly harsh, but on the other hand it gives them park access forever as well.

Seriously Al?

Note the capitalized "F" making it a proper name. In this case, of an organization.
Check out http://www.yellowstonenationalparklodges.com/introducing-yellowstone-forever/.

I'd give YOU seven days in jail for not figuring that out.

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2017 at 01:19 UTC
In reply to:

SRHEdD: I'd take a good eye with a crap camera over a crap eye with a good camera any day. At my wedding some years ago, I asked my university Photo II class students to show up and shoot away. They loved shooting for their teacher, and getting a few beers and a piece of cake for their efforts. You never saw so many K1000s in one place in your life. Alas, I've just moved in the past week and the album is packed away still or I'd scan a couple to post. They were an insightful, creative, and vastly different group of photos (and films), and we loved them all.

We weren't lucky, we just had a different set of expectations. We did not require technically perfect photos, just photos of us and our friends celebrating a day. More akin to a shotgun versus a rifle. We had numbers in our favor, and photographers who were excited to participate, rather than a gear wrangler with an eye on his/her portfolio. I've personally photographed nearly 500 weddings with everything from a Pentax 67 to an Oly IS-10 to Leicas to Nikon D3s, never once did the camera jump up an make a stellar contribution on its own. I on the other hand I managed to get some decent shots out of all of them. I stopped when I woke up on wedding day dreading the hours ahead. More wedding photographers should consider the same path, and leave the work to those excited to shoot regardless of their camera. Nothing is worse at a wedding (and we've all seen it) than a passive-aggressive photographer wishing he/she was elsewhere, but wants the check.

Link | Posted on Dec 29, 2016 at 13:41 UTC

I'd take a good eye with a crap camera over a crap eye with a good camera any day. At my wedding some years ago, I asked my university Photo II class students to show up and shoot away. They loved shooting for their teacher, and getting a few beers and a piece of cake for their efforts. You never saw so many K1000s in one place in your life. Alas, I've just moved in the past week and the album is packed away still or I'd scan a couple to post. They were an insightful, creative, and vastly different group of photos (and films), and we loved them all.

Link | Posted on Dec 29, 2016 at 03:42 UTC as 205th comment | 7 replies
On article Throwback Thursday: Fujifilm FinePix F601 Zoom (49 comments in total)

I had the Leica version!
https://www.dpreview.com/articles/7988880748/leicadigilux43

Link | Posted on Nov 17, 2016 at 15:29 UTC as 19th comment | 4 replies
On article Apple revamps MacBook Pro lineup, adds 'Touch Bar' (866 comments in total)

I was about to complain about the lack of an SD card reader, but then I remember I have/use a 3" Lightning to SD card reader with my phone. Love this little guy.

http://www.apple.com/shop/product/MJYT2AM/A/lightning-to-sd-card-camera-reader

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2016 at 12:31 UTC as 17th comment | 2 replies
On article Upwardly mobile: Sony a6300 Review (2162 comments in total)

I will say this VERY negative thing... I stopped by my local camera store last week and tried the SAL55300 on a LA-EA4 on my A6300, hoping on hope that it would suffice. Not even close. In broad daylight at ISO800, I still had a VERY low number of acceptably sharp shots. That's just CRAZY, and my hands don't really shake that much for an old guy. I need OSS or IBIS or VR whenever possible.

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2016 at 19:40 UTC as 303rd comment | 3 replies
On article Upwardly mobile: Sony a6300 Review (2162 comments in total)

I have both cameras, a Nikon Df for lowest light requirements, and a D7100 just save the others when I need to shoot a high number of frames (kids' lacrosse and football). They all serve me very well. I was happy to open the A6300 and get a better build quality and the ability to add my copyright info. That and similar to A6000 performance is perfect for me, I had no real complaints about the A6000 other than those two niggles. If I shoot APS-C, either Sony is preferable to the D7100, but the lack of a reasonable 300mm for the Sony keeps me using the 70-300VR on the D7100. The A7ii was a very nice camera, but the Nikon Df is a better tool for me. I may still go back to the A7ii though. It crosses my mind regularly that I miss the IBIS. The other two A7 bodies are just more than I care to spend. The biggest change for me over the years has been that I can have as many "systems" as I like. I don't have to choose one over the other when "both" is a perfectly fine answer.

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2016 at 19:40 UTC as 304th comment | 1 reply
On article Design, looks and desire: Olympus does it again (391 comments in total)

I bought a silver Nikon DF because it had only what I needed and was full frame. I have other cameras for function, but the DF is a blast to take out for the fun stuff. The Oly E-P5 is the same way for me but was replaced by the A6000, which does most everything well. I love the look of this one, too, just don't know if there is a hole in my bag for it.

I'm lucky to have seen most of the originals these new cameras are sorta based on, and lucky enough to be able to afford both a work bag and a fun bag of kit.

Great article. Pieces like this keep me coming back to dpreview, even after the Amazon tie-in tainted the actual reviews (IMHO).

Link | Posted on Feb 1, 2016 at 22:32 UTC as 53rd comment
On article Nikon announces Coolpix AW130 and S33 rugged compacts (32 comments in total)

Don't overthink this camera, it is what it is! I have the AW100, took it to the theme parks here in Florida, got great SNAPS with no worries! My sons are playing in the pool, and I throw it in after them. They get priceless SNAPS. I paid $150 for it on closeout at Office Depot, and it has been worth every penny. Low expectations are very easily satisfied. I think it does exactly what it was intended to do, but then I'm not Jacques Cousteau.

Link | Posted on Nov 5, 2015 at 00:46 UTC as 1st comment
Total: 68, showing: 1 – 20
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