wetsleet

Joined on May 4, 2004

Comments

Total: 605, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

wetsleet: Never mind the storage medium, let's just call it B. To get a week's worth of mobile power transferred from A to B in a matter of seconds is going to need either very high voltages (hence with the kind of isolation you see in high voltage installations) or very high currents, which means very fat wires. Actually, cables would be a better word. Or superconducting wires, yes, that would do it also.

And as others have mentioned, if you've ever shorted out a large capacitor, you know what can happen. The Note 7 will seem like popping candy in comparison.

So no shortage of obstacles to overcome. I just don't get why they keep promising the idea of charging "in seconds" however, it's just promising disappointment. The rest of it, yeah, great stuff!

It's like you say, IF the connecting wires are thick enough. When they cry that there is not even enough spare space to accommodate a headphone socket, squeezing in a couple of car jump leads is going to be problematic.

Link | Posted on Dec 5, 2016 at 20:25 UTC
In reply to:

wetsleet: Never mind the storage medium, let's just call it B. To get a week's worth of mobile power transferred from A to B in a matter of seconds is going to need either very high voltages (hence with the kind of isolation you see in high voltage installations) or very high currents, which means very fat wires. Actually, cables would be a better word. Or superconducting wires, yes, that would do it also.

And as others have mentioned, if you've ever shorted out a large capacitor, you know what can happen. The Note 7 will seem like popping candy in comparison.

So no shortage of obstacles to overcome. I just don't get why they keep promising the idea of charging "in seconds" however, it's just promising disappointment. The rest of it, yeah, great stuff!

@joelbedford - I answered your question already, in the last sentence of my post.
@dr.noise - agree 100%
@Scottelly - 12v x 5amps won't deliver a week's worth of power "in a few seconds"

Link | Posted on Nov 26, 2016 at 15:34 UTC

Never mind the storage medium, let's just call it B. To get a week's worth of mobile power transferred from A to B in a matter of seconds is going to need either very high voltages (hence with the kind of isolation you see in high voltage installations) or very high currents, which means very fat wires. Actually, cables would be a better word. Or superconducting wires, yes, that would do it also.

And as others have mentioned, if you've ever shorted out a large capacitor, you know what can happen. The Note 7 will seem like popping candy in comparison.

So no shortage of obstacles to overcome. I just don't get why they keep promising the idea of charging "in seconds" however, it's just promising disappointment. The rest of it, yeah, great stuff!

Link | Posted on Nov 26, 2016 at 10:17 UTC as 8th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

wetsleet: I waiting for someone to invent a system with a foot stirrup and hand strap that you pull (a bit like one of those abs-trainers) to ratchet down a coil spring, which would then slowly and continuously turn a dynamo powered charging circuit. With the correct gearing and maybe necessitating several pulls of the strap to fully wind the spring, I think you would have a far more portable, robust and reliable way of charging stuff on the hoof.

"It simply won't work" is never a good attitude to start with. All you will ever do is work towards proving the existence of current obstacles, and it is always my first reflex too. I do understand what you are saying about the energy density of springs etc, I am also well aware that you won't get out more than you put in, and that a lot of energy does need to go in, etc. I would suggest more of a "how can/could/might it be made to work, what obstacles need to be overcome? From what you are saying, some materials science into springs possibly?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_nanotube_springs
The world is full of things they said can't be done.

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2016 at 23:18 UTC

the angle at which the panel presents itself seems optimised for latitudes where the sun simply isn't strong enough to make the idea work in the first place.

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2016 at 21:15 UTC as 15th comment | 1 reply

I waiting for someone to invent a system with a foot stirrup and hand strap that you pull (a bit like one of those abs-trainers) to ratchet down a coil spring, which would then slowly and continuously turn a dynamo powered charging circuit. With the correct gearing and maybe necessitating several pulls of the strap to fully wind the spring, I think you would have a far more portable, robust and reliable way of charging stuff on the hoof.

Link | Posted on Nov 2, 2016 at 21:12 UTC as 16th comment | 6 replies
On article Google Pixel XL real-world sample gallery (103 comments in total)
In reply to:

Mark Turney: I hate to break it to everyone, but these look "good" because they processed them in camera for best impression on small high resolution screens, which is how 99% of people will view them. It's marketing for the sheeple ... plain and simple.

That being said, this cell cam is likely just as good/bad as iPhone, Samsung or any of the other higher quality units. Just differences in PP at this level of device quality.

I don't get it. What is the problem with a camera that makes pictures that look good? I thought that was the point.

In my day I tried to make them look good on paper, via "processing" in the darkroom. Now the camera does the processing, to make them look good the way 99% of us view them today. What exactly are you "breaking" to us that troubles you so?

Link | Posted on Oct 31, 2016 at 17:48 UTC

Loads of posts suggesting it's a hardware problem ergo can't be fixed in software. Like chromatic aberration? Like pin-cushion/barrel distortion?

I'm not suggesting software is the ideal fix, and Google's homily on flare seems designed to infuriate. But in any other camera we'd be reaching for a lens hood first, and maybe wiping the fingerprints off too, before telling the manufacturer how to do their job. But somehow with mobile phones, especially at launch, it is popular to be seen to have identified some "killer flaw" and suggest that it is all for want of two words, "product testing". If it makes some armchair experts believe they could do a better job, so be it.

Link | Posted on Oct 30, 2016 at 20:08 UTC as 3rd comment
In reply to:

Jim: I was at the airport recently and EVERY flight from EVERY airline made the announcement to turn any Samsung Note 7 off before boarding. What a catestrophic PR debacle. And to make matters worse, this is the announcement being made at EVERY airport worldwide. It just doesn't get any worse than this from a marketing standpoint.

calls into question the wisdom of choosing to blur the lines between the different model lines by aligning all on the number 7. Like you say, to my mum and the general public, they are all just a Samsung Galaxy 7, so they all explode.

Link | Posted on Oct 12, 2016 at 19:41 UTC
On article Teardown reveals Sony image sensors in iPhone 7 (201 comments in total)
In reply to:

rfsIII: If Sony is the Kodak of image sensor makers (because they seem to produce the majority) then who is the Agfa? Or the Fuji or the GAF or the Ilford or the Bergger or the Adox?
Why do I care? I'd like to be able to pick my phone based on sensor characteristics, rather than brand. Apple phones make nice images and all, but they feel a little too nice...

And Fujifilm, who are they like?

Link | Posted on Sep 23, 2016 at 20:07 UTC
In reply to:

Francis Sawyer: So Apple stabilized the lens that needs it LESS.

You know what? Apple should just remove the lens from the camera. I mean.. lenses are "old" technology, just like the headphone jack. Then they could sell a lens dongle, to "adapt" the camera to taking pictures. Just like the headphone dongle adapts the music player to play music.

Well, it would certainly fit with their reasoning of allowing the phone to be thinner. That camera/lens assembly bump has always been something of a carbuncle on the back of the iPhone.

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2016 at 21:11 UTC
In reply to:

tireur: Wrong, Apple Germany told me: both cameras have image stabilisation.

@5inchfloppy
OK, but how does that fit with:
“Note that for the dual-camera of iPhone 7 Plus, wide-angle CCM is equipped with optical image stabilization (OIS) VCM, while telephoto CCM only comes with general VCM."
I don't see how a voice coil motor implementation of image stabilisation would not be classified as optical image stabilisation, which was the implication of the article. Maybe they got it wrong?
Put another way, what is the difference between "general" VCM and OIS VCM?

Link | Posted on Sep 15, 2016 at 21:05 UTC
In reply to:

tireur: Wrong, Apple Germany told me: both cameras have image stabilisation.

but was it clear from the Gremans that it was OIS for both lenses? The report above acknowledges that both lenses have image stabilisation of some sort, but only one is OIS, the other is VCM, which I take to mean vibration compensation in software?

Link | Posted on Sep 13, 2016 at 20:46 UTC
On article Apple unveils iPhone 7 and dual-cam iPhone 7 Plus (920 comments in total)
In reply to:

ShreedharHegde: It is pretty sad, how Apple is in its way to kill the real meaning of depth of field and creating its own legacy. What iPhone came up with is called as selective focus and not the depth of field. Does having a f/1.8 aperture make it any different? As we all know, Galaxy S7 and HTC 10 already had F/1.7 26mm earlier.
The basic understanding here should be the aperture control, to create depth of field while iPhone 7 plus has the fixed f/1.8 (wideangle) and f/2.8 (telephoto).

In a real world scenario, you would use the aperture eye change the depth of field, just like the human eye. As an example to a newbie, if you place an object near your eye and focus on that object, your pupil expands (lets say f/1.4 and you may observe the background is blur - which is shallow depth of field) and when you stare at a 100ft distance your pupil contracts (lets say f/8.0, and you may observe no more blur). That is how the aperture control works.

And they have also misappropriated the word "zoom", deliberately dumbing down the word to apply it to a step jump between two fixed focal length lenses.

Link | Posted on Sep 8, 2016 at 17:12 UTC
On article Apple unveils iPhone 7 and dual-cam iPhone 7 Plus (920 comments in total)

When did two fixed focal length lenses start being called a "zoom"? Especially on DPR!

Link | Posted on Sep 8, 2016 at 17:08 UTC as 59th comment | 2 replies

Would it not have made more sense to make the wifi card CF shaped, as most people will have loads of SD memory cards they want to use for storage, but not so many CF cards of decent capacity.

Link | Posted on Aug 25, 2016 at 10:45 UTC as 20th comment | 1 reply

" User error is far more likely [than the sensational AF system] to be the reason for a missed shot "

Ultimately a missed shot is a missed shot. How much of "user error" is down to the design/ergonomics of the camera, and how much to sheer cussedness of the pro photog? Where I'm getting to here is, to what extent does the camera get in the way of taking a perfectly focussed picture?

Link | Posted on Jun 5, 2016 at 18:37 UTC as 25th comment
On article Motorola Moto X Force / Droid Turbo 2 camera review (40 comments in total)
In reply to:

wetsleet: "The Moto X Force comes with Qualcomm's current top-end chipset Snapdragon 820 ..."
If only! But I thought it came with the 810?

And thanks for reviewing this phone. It has not received much limelight, so it is good to read a solid camera review. I never buy phones anywhere close to launch price, so your slow but thorough approach to getting things done is fine by me!

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2016 at 12:31 UTC
On article Motorola Moto X Force / Droid Turbo 2 camera review (40 comments in total)

"The Moto X Force comes with Qualcomm's current top-end chipset Snapdragon 820 ..."
If only! But I thought it came with the 810?

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2016 at 12:09 UTC as 11th comment | 2 replies

These bags should come with a built in and properly designed hip belt. I want the weight carried as low a possible, not supported unequally on my aching shoulder and all the way down my spine.
I do like the lighter coloured lid - I find the black bags get very hot out in the sun all day.

Link | Posted on May 8, 2016 at 18:41 UTC as 2nd comment
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