453C

Lives in Papua New Guinea Papua New Guinea
Joined on Aug 15, 2010

Comments

Total: 323, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Why Toi: In the meantime with all the talk of undemocratic China and the democratic USA, then how the heck did the US invade Iraq illegally and destroyed a country and its people, then led the rise of ISIL? What kind of democracy is that? Some in the US are truly brainwashed and not seeing the facts out there. Sad! In the meantime, the real reason is likely to be the economic competition with Apple’s iPhone than some network hack.

So ... you're buying one?

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2018 at 13:57 UTC
In reply to:

Why Toi: In the meantime with all the talk of undemocratic China and the democratic USA, then how the heck did the US invade Iraq illegally and destroyed a country and its people, then led the rise of ISIL? What kind of democracy is that? Some in the US are truly brainwashed and not seeing the facts out there. Sad! In the meantime, the real reason is likely to be the economic competition with Apple’s iPhone than some network hack.

So ... you're buying one?

Link | Posted on Jan 17, 2018 at 13:57 UTC
In reply to:

Franz Weber: I don’t believe that he shot Obama naked

Maybe he just ejaculated on him. You know, for the art.

I don't think that's an acceptable action in the course of photographing a model in a non-pornographic setting, but people like SarahTerra have no problem with that.

Link | Posted on Jan 15, 2018 at 14:05 UTC
In reply to:

doctor digi: I'm not a great fan of any of the people being accused of things of late (and I sometimes think it was about time they got pulled down a peg or two) but I find it rather uncomfortable that peoples' careers are being destroyed based on a handful of accusations which are unproven in a court of law - and some accusations that wouldn't even see the inside of a court room because they are not criminal. Mark my words, this is going to come back and bite society hard in future unless we all handle this a lot better; and that doesn't men sweep things under the carpet and pretend powerful men (and women too) don't abuse their position. It means not being judge/jury/executioner in social media and it means anonymity for those accused.

Sarah, I have no idea how you took that away from what I wrote.

There is very clear, tangible evidence that Richardson has performed sex acts with his models. He's proudly displayed it for years. Do you deny that this has occurred? He doesn't. As I said several times, in his case, it's all about consent.

I never once said he was guilty of anything. I've repeatedly said that I don't think a great photographer needs to ejaculate on his models. Apparently, you do.

I haven't "tried and convicted" anyone, found anyone "guilty", or acted "high and mighty" about anything, but I take some pride in not ejaculating on my employees.

Frankly, something is wrong with you if you've taken any of that away from my comments.

Link | Posted on Jan 11, 2018 at 23:35 UTC
In reply to:

doctor digi: I'm not a great fan of any of the people being accused of things of late (and I sometimes think it was about time they got pulled down a peg or two) but I find it rather uncomfortable that peoples' careers are being destroyed based on a handful of accusations which are unproven in a court of law - and some accusations that wouldn't even see the inside of a court room because they are not criminal. Mark my words, this is going to come back and bite society hard in future unless we all handle this a lot better; and that doesn't men sweep things under the carpet and pretend powerful men (and women too) don't abuse their position. It means not being judge/jury/executioner in social media and it means anonymity for those accused.

Sarah, who's "mentality" are you addressing?

Link | Posted on Jan 11, 2018 at 22:55 UTC
In reply to:

doctor digi: I'm not a great fan of any of the people being accused of things of late (and I sometimes think it was about time they got pulled down a peg or two) but I find it rather uncomfortable that peoples' careers are being destroyed based on a handful of accusations which are unproven in a court of law - and some accusations that wouldn't even see the inside of a court room because they are not criminal. Mark my words, this is going to come back and bite society hard in future unless we all handle this a lot better; and that doesn't men sweep things under the carpet and pretend powerful men (and women too) don't abuse their position. It means not being judge/jury/executioner in social media and it means anonymity for those accused.

Sarah, this issue _in this case_ is precisely about this guy's business practices.

I don't need a lecture about social justice or the rest. I know people that have been wrongly accused, and I know rape victims that have been fearful of going through all it takes to criminally prosecute a suspect. I also know that these cases are rarely clear cut, but in this instance, the only point of contention is consent. Criminally, I doubt it'll go anywhere. Does that mean there should be no consequences for decades of this behaviour?

Instead of extrapolating this into something more, I'm concentrating on the one person involved in this case that has left no doubt about their involvement, apart from consent. I'm not commenting on metoo-ers, or anything else. Bottom line is I'm only commenting on Terry Richardson. If you want to do otherwise, that's your call.

As I said, a great photographer should be able to work with other professionals without ejaculating on them. Do you disagree?

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2018 at 05:40 UTC
In reply to:

doctor digi: I'm not a great fan of any of the people being accused of things of late (and I sometimes think it was about time they got pulled down a peg or two) but I find it rather uncomfortable that peoples' careers are being destroyed based on a handful of accusations which are unproven in a court of law - and some accusations that wouldn't even see the inside of a court room because they are not criminal. Mark my words, this is going to come back and bite society hard in future unless we all handle this a lot better; and that doesn't men sweep things under the carpet and pretend powerful men (and women too) don't abuse their position. It means not being judge/jury/executioner in social media and it means anonymity for those accused.

Everyone has their own agenda, so that would be a question best posed to each accuser. As an aside, I'd prefer these allegations were immediately reported, and moving forward, maybe we'll see them approached in a more timely, fairer way. That has no bearing on a photographer keeping his pants on during a shoot, does it? There's no doubt in this case that he had sexual involvement with the models. It all hinges on the consensual nature of the acts.

My question to Mr. Richardson would be, "Why did you feel it was appropriate to participate in your photography as you did?" Looks to me like another cult of personality in play; if you wanted Terry's beneficial endorsement, you were expected to play his games. I could have that wrong, and there was some other dynamic afoot.

I'd like to think that a great photographer would be able to work with other professionals without ejaculating on them. I don't think that's setting the bar too high.

Link | Posted on Jan 10, 2018 at 01:41 UTC
In reply to:

doctor digi: I'm not a great fan of any of the people being accused of things of late (and I sometimes think it was about time they got pulled down a peg or two) but I find it rather uncomfortable that peoples' careers are being destroyed based on a handful of accusations which are unproven in a court of law - and some accusations that wouldn't even see the inside of a court room because they are not criminal. Mark my words, this is going to come back and bite society hard in future unless we all handle this a lot better; and that doesn't men sweep things under the carpet and pretend powerful men (and women too) don't abuse their position. It means not being judge/jury/executioner in social media and it means anonymity for those accused.

Or people could keep their pants on when photographing art.

Seems a reasonable prerequisite for employers. :shrug:

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2018 at 12:42 UTC
On article A letter from the Publisher (332 comments in total)
In reply to:

love2travelfar: it is strange . Why would a "sponsor" want an article marked "sponsored" here?
EVERYBODY avoids those. It's almost anti-advertising.
Isn't enough to make good products everybody would push without being pushed?

I doubt DPR's stats support the opinion that everybody avoids sponsored content.

As long as it's labeled as such, I've no problem with DPR earning money from manufacturers. This site isn't run by a couple of people using FrontPage on Mom's computer, and they need reliable revenue to keep it going.

Link | Posted on Jan 4, 2018 at 01:26 UTC
In reply to:

Gmon750: This is just a Lightroom-version of Gimp. Will cover the basics and be fine for those that believe that engineers that develop software should work for free.

I'll pass.

Bob, I wouldn't worry about it.

Some of these Comments appear to be open sourced.

Link | Posted on Dec 28, 2017 at 03:40 UTC
In reply to:

Gmon750: This is just a Lightroom-version of Gimp. Will cover the basics and be fine for those that believe that engineers that develop software should work for free.

I'll pass.

What about Windows developers of freeware? I'm very 100% ignorant/clueless about freeloading nerds, or whatever you're on about.

Link | Posted on Dec 27, 2017 at 22:33 UTC
In reply to:

entoman: It's great that they acted decently by owing up and paying compensation.

BUT, I'd strongly question whether a customer's (or anyone else's) photograph should be used even as a FPO for mock up.

This sort of error happens quite frequently (it's happened to me several times).

It would be more sensible and responsible if companies used FPO images that were either taken by someone in their employment (and paid accordingly), or used creative commons/non-copyright images.

I don't work in this field, so please forgive me if this is naïve.

Why not use a simple photo of a notecard, with a text description of the proposed photo on it? That would seem pretty hard to miss while reviewing before publishing, and there'd never be a copyright issue.

Link | Posted on Dec 23, 2017 at 05:12 UTC
In reply to:

sirhawkeye64: With smartphone cameras getting better every few months, and mirrorless APS-C cameras gaining steam, the gap between the two is slowly closing so it's making MFT even more "irrelevant." And now we have APS-C cameras (like the Fuji X-T2/X-T20, Sony a6xxx-line, etc) that are about the same size as most MFT bodies, but with larger sensors which offer somewhat better low-light performance. So the MFT line I feel will slowly go extinct (in terms of new additions to the existing line). It's a slowly dying format that will be overtaken by smartphones and larger-sensor mirrorless cameras as prices between APS-C and MFT cameras are about the same, and since physical size is about the same, MFT doesn't really have a whole lot of advantage left, other than interchangability of lenses between different MFT manufacturers.

If you read that quote in the full context of my comment, you'll see that I was responding to something said by someone else, which changes the meaning.
https://tinyurl.com/ycutphqs

I'm well aware that smartphone tech is advancing faster than probably any other sector of photography, but I don't think we're going to see tiny sensored cameras outstrip much larger ones in the near future, even with computational photography. More likely, I think we'll see ILC manufacturers put some of the same computational approaches to use in their cameras. The Olympus E-M1 MkII and the Panasonic GH5/G9 already have significant processing power on board, so I don't see much of a leap to more advanced computational techniques.

Link | Posted on Dec 22, 2017 at 18:10 UTC
In reply to:

Team Yeti: This isn't over yet -- not by a long shot. One of those letter of the law vs. spirit of the law deals. It's all going to boil down to lawyers and judges figuring out who has various easements, what the law says about public access, what defines "public", if the photographers are commercial in nature and need a permit, etc.

The wealthy HOA is telling photographers they can return, hoping to save face. And the city is saying stay off the public sidewalks for your photo shoots.

That leaves what, exactly? Trampling uninvited on some resident's front lawn with your equipment, clients, assistants, etc. That's called trespassing. Guaranteed the cops will be called before this is all over with.

This is just the HOA and city trying to CYA.

Did they? Last I knew, commercial photography was regulated in U.S. national parks, not banned.

Link | Posted on Dec 22, 2017 at 17:54 UTC
In reply to:

tedolf: That thing looks like it is in mint condition.

Hard to believe that it was ever used.

tEdolph

It should be in excellent condition. I always wore gloves, and stored it in a pouch made of the foreskins of circumcised chinchillas.

Link | Posted on Dec 22, 2017 at 16:52 UTC
In reply to:

Jim Salvas: I expect Disney will change the National Geographic Channel lineup. Here's tonights: World's Most Dangerous Prisons, Life on Lockdown, World's Deadliest Gangs, Life on Lockdown (again) and Drugs, Inc.

It's Fox's typical message: be afraid; be very afraid (particularly of brown people).

Eddy - I wasn't "sidelining" anything. If you read Jim's initial post and my initial response, that was my complaint in its entirety. Once Jim provided some context, I believe we understand one another, and I never argued that NatGeo's programming had improved of late.

Link | Posted on Dec 22, 2017 at 15:10 UTC
In reply to:

Joel Halbert: I note in these comments, aside from the usual non-original derision, some skepticism about the Canadian factory.

If you learn more about the history of Leitz, then you will come to appreciate the Midland Ontario E Leitz Canada (ELCAN) factory. The quality of assembly was top-notch for normal Leica-system catalog products, but the real contribution was the huge variety of custom-designed ELCAN equipment, including many highly specialized and ultra-high-performance lenses. The dean of optical design there was Walter Mandler, originally apprenticed to Leitz lens designer Max Berek, but who then emigrated from Germany and made his career and life in Canada. Mandler was an industry pioneer in the early application of computerized lens design - unthinkable to do without today, but a new engineering concept in the 1950s and '60s. (continued in reply...)

Joel, I do see your point, but I've never seen such a defence make a difference in this context.

Though small, I certainly appreciate the ingenuity and care that went into such a camera, but I doubt "CanikonLuver98" is going to give a fig about something they believe to be an overpriced lump of obsolescence. We live in a disposable world, and the number of people that actually make things is dwindling; even fewer people make things designed to last. I believe a lack of that connection is at least part of why some find it difficult to appreciate fine work, such as a collectible Leica.

Better to live well and ignore the gits. Enjoy your Christmas, and be glad that another Leica will be in good hands. : )

Link | Posted on Dec 22, 2017 at 15:00 UTC
In reply to:

Joel Halbert: I note in these comments, aside from the usual non-original derision, some skepticism about the Canadian factory.

If you learn more about the history of Leitz, then you will come to appreciate the Midland Ontario E Leitz Canada (ELCAN) factory. The quality of assembly was top-notch for normal Leica-system catalog products, but the real contribution was the huge variety of custom-designed ELCAN equipment, including many highly specialized and ultra-high-performance lenses. The dean of optical design there was Walter Mandler, originally apprenticed to Leitz lens designer Max Berek, but who then emigrated from Germany and made his career and life in Canada. Mandler was an industry pioneer in the early application of computerized lens design - unthinkable to do without today, but a new engineering concept in the 1950s and '60s. (continued in reply...)

Joel - Thanks for the history; please hold the attitude next time. It only serves to reinforce negative opinions of Leica.

No doubt Leica knows how to make excellent gear, and it's priced accordingly. There's no arguing with their ability to leverage their history and brand to staggering levels, either. Nothing wrong with that in my book.

This particular item is no exception, but I consider it to have become more a piece of mechanical art than just a camera. I hope the new owner runs at least a few rolls through it.

Link | Posted on Dec 22, 2017 at 05:56 UTC
In reply to:

tedolf: That thing looks like it is in mint condition.

Hard to believe that it was ever used.

tEdolph

No surprise. I didn't use it much.

I wondered where I put it.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2017 at 22:53 UTC
In reply to:

clickhiker: I found the Top of the World Hwy (TOW) in Alaska, to be VERY dark late in September, after the border crossing is closed for Winter. And along the Dempster Highway from the Arctic Circle, N to the NWT border, is also a very dark area save the occasional vehicle traffic (0-10 vehicles per hour?). The South end of Kluane Lake is excellent some of the time, but since Slims River dried-up mostly, there can be lots of dust in the atmosphere on some windy nights. Nahanni NP is also quite dark, but accessible only by air. I'm 65 this month, and the night of September 25 this year, on the TOW, there were more stars visible than anytime in my life, including at altitude. A truly incredible experience!

It's a beautiful area. These places still exist, but by their very nature, they can be a little (or a lot) more difficult to visit. People just need to get out there.

Link | Posted on Dec 21, 2017 at 15:03 UTC
Total: 323, showing: 1 – 20
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