Jim Kaye

Lives in United States United States
Joined on Jul 29, 2003

Comments

Total: 9, showing: 1 – 9
On article Nikon offers free battery exchange for D500 owners (96 comments in total)

I think they're just doing what they should do. But they not only require a valid receipt for the D500 -- they also require that you register the camera with Nikon (which means give them your name, phone number, email address, and D500 serial number). They would have most of that information anyway to process the battery exchange, but it's an annoying process. I waited more than 20 minutes to speak to a customer service rep about this initially. Then when the promised email with instructions to upload a scan of the receipt hadn't arrived after 3 hours, I spent another 20 minutes waiting to speak to another customer service rep about the same issue (who insisted that I had to verify and/or "update" my phone number, address, and email address even though only 3 hours had passed since my last encounter). You'd think in this era they could simply post clear instructions for getting the battery exchange on their web site and not force people to wait to talk to someone about it!

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2016 at 00:54 UTC as 26th comment | 8 replies
On article Nikon releases ViewNX-i image browsing software (108 comments in total)

Hangs for minutes with spinning beach ball on my MacBook Pro, 8 GB RAM, running Yosemite 10.10.2. After force close, same problem on trying to reopen it. Uninstalled it and put NX2 back -- Nikon has to do better than this.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2015 at 00:12 UTC as 23rd comment | 1 reply
On article Nikon D750 Review (1989 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Kaye: The description of the one-direction AF sensors as "horizontally sensitive" is a bit misleading. With the camera in landscape mode (as in the video posted in the review showing low-light focusing), a peripheral sensor fails to focus on a vertical line. Isn't this because it is actually "vertically sensitive" (meaning that it detects contrast along a vertical line)? Since a vertical white line on a black background doesn't present much contrast in this direction, the sensor doesn't see it. There is lots of horizontal contrast, though (black on the left of the vertical line, then the white line itself, then black again to the right of the line). By "horizontally sensitive" I imagine the reviewer means that the sensor "sees" horizontal (but not vertical) lines. But the sensor itself must be oriented vertically with the camera in this orientation, so I would call it "vertically sensitive." Or am I missing something?

Actually the detail (contrast) has to be along a vertical vector (shooting with the camera in landscape orientation, as described in the review), but yes, you're right, of course it doesn't have to be perfectly vertically oriented detail (I.e., if it's a line, the line doesn't have to be perfectly horizontal).

Link | Posted on Dec 25, 2014 at 05:42 UTC
On article Nikon D750 Review (1989 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jim Kaye: The description of the one-direction AF sensors as "horizontally sensitive" is a bit misleading. With the camera in landscape mode (as in the video posted in the review showing low-light focusing), a peripheral sensor fails to focus on a vertical line. Isn't this because it is actually "vertically sensitive" (meaning that it detects contrast along a vertical line)? Since a vertical white line on a black background doesn't present much contrast in this direction, the sensor doesn't see it. There is lots of horizontal contrast, though (black on the left of the vertical line, then the white line itself, then black again to the right of the line). By "horizontally sensitive" I imagine the reviewer means that the sensor "sees" horizontal (but not vertical) lines. But the sensor itself must be oriented vertically with the camera in this orientation, so I would call it "vertically sensitive." Or am I missing something?

Thanks for the reply, Rishi! Yes, my post was wordy, but the ambiguity I was pointing out is really no more complicated than what arises when explaining, for example, "equivalent FL" on one sensor format vs another: to be clear, one has to use at least two words to express two concepts, e.g., a "50 mm lens on m4/3" is equivalent (in its angle of view) to a "100 mm lens on FX." Similarly (with the camera in landscape orientation) the peripheral D750 sensors are sensitive to "horizontal lines" or, equivalently, to "vertical contrast." Either "horizontal-line sensitive" or "vertical contrast sensitive" would be an adequate description. For gear heads the latter is probably preferable because it better describes the orientation of the physical AF sensor, but for photographers, I agree, your choicer is more descriptive since it relates more closely to what the simplest effective autofocus target looks like.

Excellent review overall, BTW -- thanks for all the effort!

Link | Posted on Dec 23, 2014 at 15:33 UTC
On article Nikon D750 Review (1989 comments in total)

The description of the one-direction AF sensors as "horizontally sensitive" is a bit misleading. With the camera in landscape mode (as in the video posted in the review showing low-light focusing), a peripheral sensor fails to focus on a vertical line. Isn't this because it is actually "vertically sensitive" (meaning that it detects contrast along a vertical line)? Since a vertical white line on a black background doesn't present much contrast in this direction, the sensor doesn't see it. There is lots of horizontal contrast, though (black on the left of the vertical line, then the white line itself, then black again to the right of the line). By "horizontally sensitive" I imagine the reviewer means that the sensor "sees" horizontal (but not vertical) lines. But the sensor itself must be oriented vertically with the camera in this orientation, so I would call it "vertically sensitive." Or am I missing something?

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2014 at 19:39 UTC as 379th comment | 6 replies
On article Nikon D810: A sport photographer's impressions (255 comments in total)
In reply to:

michael2011: "And yes, the D810 is waterproof."

I seriously doubt it. Is this Nikon's claim or just the author's opinion?

Thanks for an interesting and informative post, as well as your thoughtful responses to many of the comments and questions.

Link | Posted on Aug 13, 2014 at 14:36 UTC
On a photo in the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX7 review samples sample gallery (2 comments in total)

Awfully good detail and color for ISO 3200 and f/2 -- what a sweet little lens, and this sensor and JPEG engine look terrific.

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2013 at 16:26 UTC as 2nd comment
On photo P1030193 in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (2 comments in total)

Awfully good detail and color for ISO 3200 and f/2 -- what a sweet little lens, and this sensor and JPEG engine look terrific.

Link | Posted on Oct 11, 2013 at 16:26 UTC as 2nd comment

Many dancers look remarkably tall, even when they aren't, because of the way they carry themselves.

If the assignment had been to create a photo doing everything possible to counteract this tendency, I would give this an A+.

1. Use a wide angle lens and shoot from above waist height to foreshorten the legs.

2. Point one leg toward the camera to make it disappear entirely.

3. Use the dancer's hand to hide her neck.

4. Have her lean forward (again, pointing toward the camera).

5. Put her head against the upper edge of the frame so it looks like she has nowhere to go and is getting crushed.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2013 at 16:32 UTC as 19th comment | 1 reply
Total: 9, showing: 1 – 9