MartinDixon

Joined on May 4, 2014

Comments

Total: 70, showing: 61 – 70
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MartinDixon: The idea is fine - the return to traditionally waiting for the results - but tell that to clients. And for that matter, if surprise is an aspect of photography, why not give the camera to a kid on the street and see what they come back with after a few hours? Let's make movies without knowing if we have it in the can. Let's ask doctors to not use medical scopes and cure cancer by "feeling" for lumps in our colon with their thumbs. Come on already. LCD or no LCD will not make you a stronger photographer if you have nothing to say. There's too much worry about tech and not enough about story telling and visually arresting graphics. Everyone says show me your camera instead of show me your portfolio. Sad.

Either the word "art" is being used cynically or we have just stopped seeing that there is a huge difference between casual observations and specific observations. It's an old argument used to disparage modern painters like Pollack et al. My three year old could do that. I could put paint on my dog's paws and let him run on a canvas. Art, I hope, should imply you have something to say. And in that vein, your professionalism is the manner in which you choose to express it. But unfortunately, so much of what I see today is simply average images of banal scenes in which the author rants about what gear was used to film it. But they never go into what moved them about the image, how they hope to move the viewers. Let's make photographs that matter, let's explore the world and have the convictions to stand by our choices. I am not a camera salesman. And I will never ask you what you used to make a great image. I will simply say good work.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2016 at 09:37 UTC

The problem with all these social media gurus is the lack of a neutral editor who will tell you when your work just doesn't cut it. When it is just simply bland. In art school the running joke was if a picture was bad, frame it. If that didn't work, make it larger. Now we have "blog it" and hope for raves. And just what do all these likes add up to? Goes it get you print sales, assignments, travel grants? As a bit of art history, can anyone in the younger generation tell us who Fox Talbot was? Kudelka, DeCarava, Webb, anyone from from the Magnum school? Let's make photographs worth looking at, ( yes, dangling participle again) and stop patting ourselves on the back for simply having access to a virtual wall.

Link | Posted on Jun 9, 2016 at 20:05 UTC as 3rd comment
In reply to:

mosc: $1,368 for a glassless pass-through adapter?!? Even by Leica standards...

I do not doubt that there are many Leica users who enjoy their cameras. I love the M series for their stealth and minimalist approach. But if I am in the studio and require high end files, I grab my Mamiya DF body and leaf shutter lenses. I slap a digital back on and tether it to Capture One. That is a simple and effective work flow that allows art directors to watch the shoot live on their ipads. What Leica wants for an SL and lenses is not worth more than a used Leaf back and good glass. And when I trade in my old backs and upgrade, I am not changing the camera. We spend so much time talking about gear and never about what we photograph. When did cameras become jewelry?

Link | Posted on Jun 7, 2016 at 10:00 UTC

The camera sounds like a robotic rig to move incrementally left and right to make post stitching easier. The reason for digitizing art is very simple when you think about countries like Mali and Syria. Thousands of years of art treasures have been destroyed by war and violence. I noticed Mario Testino was included in the Google group which is a coup for a photographer. Kudos to him. The files on screen look softened for the web but I am certain it does not represent the final image - why would anyone bother.

I don't feel threatened by a machine because I don't see what I do as "recording." We make images based on our own human filters. And what inspires me may not suit other's tastes. That is why all art is subjective. No new camera will put anyone out of business. But a lack of vision will.

Link | Posted on May 23, 2016 at 13:45 UTC as 3rd comment

For those of us who remember washing our hands with fixer to eliminate the feel of slick developer, why not make it a single use SD card that must be loaded in total darkness like sheet film. A cloth could be glued to the top panel. Of course the image should be focused upside down. With a the top shutter speed 1/250th of a second and weighing 8 pounds, we'd really be retro. No half measures here, I'm all in. When I buy it, I'll park my horse and buggy up to the general store accept confederate/ union notes.

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2016 at 14:11 UTC as 131st comment

The idea is fine - the return to traditionally waiting for the results - but tell that to clients. And for that matter, if surprise is an aspect of photography, why not give the camera to a kid on the street and see what they come back with after a few hours? Let's make movies without knowing if we have it in the can. Let's ask doctors to not use medical scopes and cure cancer by "feeling" for lumps in our colon with their thumbs. Come on already. LCD or no LCD will not make you a stronger photographer if you have nothing to say. There's too much worry about tech and not enough about story telling and visually arresting graphics. Everyone says show me your camera instead of show me your portfolio. Sad.

Link | Posted on Apr 29, 2016 at 14:01 UTC as 133rd comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

deluk: As far as branding goes I've known the Mamiya name for just about as long as I've held a camera. Had a Mamiyaflex for a while. Never heard of Phase One and suspect that I might not be the only one, so having future models with the Mamiya name makes sense to me.

For MF shooters, there is only the big three, Phase One, Mamiya Leaf and Hasselblad. The Mamiya and Phase one bodies were identical until the Phase One DF body allowed leaf shutter lenses. If Phase One bought the whole farm, then they also bought the factories and the technology. Nothing will change except a new label and ad campaign to remind people. Just make images with whatever tool you're holding.

Link | Posted on Dec 3, 2015 at 08:42 UTC
In reply to:

Lee Jay: The assumption being, the purpose of photography is to create art.

I have only recently realized that many, even most photographers think this way.

I've been shooting for over 35 years and I never really thought of photography as a way to create art, at least for me.

I guess I'm now wondering if there aren't two totally different types of photography - artistic and documentary. I've always thought of photography as a way to document events, not as a way to create art. For that reason, very little of what he said made much sense to me.

Someone commented on "Art" being emotional accuracy and that documentary work fell outside the net. I couldn't disagree more. From the Farm Work Administration during the depression to vintage war photos and modern kitsch, photographers have worked to place in context this chaotic world in which we live. Emotional accuracy implies someone is judging the work based on their agreement with its sentiment. That isn't art. If anything, we want to shake up these preconceived notions and ask why they exist and for whom? For many amateurs getting a well exposed focused photo of a novel place or subject is their greatest joy. But does it say anything? When I make photographs, I am not telling the subjects story, I am using them to help illustrate my own narrative.

Link | Posted on Nov 9, 2015 at 11:07 UTC
In reply to:

Flashback: A nice varied selection, but nothing stand out.

I was hoping for more 'pop', but it is early days yet.

Why would anyone feel they need this camera? For $12,000 I could call KEH or CaptureIntegration and get a Phase One DF body with a Leaf Shutter lens and a 33MP back for less than this monster. And those sensors are 50% larger. To whom does Leica want to sell their cameras?, celebrities and weekend vacationers? Come on, already. The lens is F4 for crying out loud. Not even f2.8. My M9s will most likely be my last investments with them. They have lost their base users of rangefinder professionals who want to discreetly make images and not be subjects themselves.

Link | Posted on Oct 28, 2015 at 20:49 UTC
In reply to:

RikPiks: Wow, Sony, well done! You have really identified the world's best photography. It's not just skilled or technically impressive stuff, but clearly merits your World's Photography Award.

The second photo in this collection, 1st Place Architecture, what an impressive photo; the blurry underside of a suspension highway is so evocative and deeply symbolic, the lighting and composition so fabulous, the concept so original, that I imagine thousands of people everywhere are rushing to print it and hang it in their homes.

It makes me want to throw my camera away. I used to think people like Ansel Adams, Brassai, Irving Penn, Sebastiao Selgado, Alfred Steiglitz, were pretty handy with a camera, but, OMG!, like wow!, really, wow!!! Hasn't photography just suddenly dazzled us? Did I miss an evolutionary leap? What a fantastic contribution Sony has presented. This stuff is amazing.

I am beginning to see the writing on the wall. These contests are feeling more and more like stock photo agencies keeping our files to be added to ad agencies and publishing houses. While I don't think these photographs represent the best of what is available in the world, I accept they are not meant to be so. They are meant to anger working pros so that we might give away our images to prove the judges wrong. Sort of like buying something expensive to show the salesperson we could afford it. As someone who has published books and worked for over 30 years as a photographer, I must accept that we are living in a Facebook, which I will not join, Youtube, 72 dpi, cell phone world. Human investment has been sacrificed for kitsch and campy "art." I would rather look at a Tyler Hicks photo from a Sunni provence than someone's silly dog with curled bangs. These competitions should clearly say, pros need not apply, but thank you for paying an admission fee to give us your pictures.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2014 at 13:58 UTC
Total: 70, showing: 61 – 70
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