stevez

Lives in United States Spring Hill, FL, United States
Works as a retired
Has a website at http://peaklight.com
Joined on Jul 12, 2000

Comments

Total: 74, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Throwback Thursday: Canon IXUS 50 / SD400 Digital ELPH (62 comments in total)

Amazingly, I still have mine. And it works just fine.

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2017 at 02:11 UTC as 8th comment
On article Video: Removing a stuck lens filter... with a band saw (139 comments in total)
In reply to:

stevez: Very entertaining for sure. Having worked in a camera store for many years I had many customers with dented and broken filters that would not budge no matter how they were gripped. So here's what I came up with that worked every time. First remove the broken pieces of glass with the lens held up side down. If the glass isn't broken you'll have to do that first, but that's another story. Next, grab the edge of the filter with heavy duty pliers - channel locks work best. Twist the heck out of the filter ring counter clockwise which causes the ring to bend inward, reducing the diameter so that it easily screws off.

You're right, it is intense. I tried it first on a lens that was totally destroyed from the impact anyway so no problem if it didn't work - but it did. In all the years I've been doing this I've never damaged the threads on the lens. It also works best if you grab the filter with the pliers just to the right of where the filter ring is dented inward so your pulling that portion away from the lens threads when you twist counter clockwise. Depending on the extent of the damage you may have to twist the pliers as much as 90 degrees before the filter ring will easily unscrew. Lenses that are not internal focus are most difficult because you must hold the focusing barrel to prevent all that torque from damaging the focusing mechanism.

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2017 at 12:28 UTC
On article Video: Removing a stuck lens filter... with a band saw (139 comments in total)

Very entertaining for sure. Having worked in a camera store for many years I had many customers with dented and broken filters that would not budge no matter how they were gripped. So here's what I came up with that worked every time. First remove the broken pieces of glass with the lens held up side down. If the glass isn't broken you'll have to do that first, but that's another story. Next, grab the edge of the filter with heavy duty pliers - channel locks work best. Twist the heck out of the filter ring counter clockwise which causes the ring to bend inward, reducing the diameter so that it easily screws off.

Link | Posted on Jun 30, 2017 at 03:10 UTC as 17th comment | 4 replies
On article Canon unveils ultra-compact EOS Rebel SL2 / EOS 200D (112 comments in total)

The specs really don't matter except for us techies. The camera will sell well in big box stores because of the brand name and because it's a new and better model.

Link | Posted on Jun 29, 2017 at 16:23 UTC as 7th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

Alex Efimoff: Tried 10 of my jpg files, none of them worked. All the settings were showing their default positions.

You don't need to save it unless you want to use this feature. Note though that the metadata portion of the file size is minuscule even at web resolution.

Link | Posted on Jun 21, 2017 at 10:47 UTC
In reply to:

Alex Efimoff: Tried 10 of my jpg files, none of them worked. All the settings were showing their default positions.

It only works if you have "automatically write changes to XMP" checked in LR catalogue settings. Conversely you can hit command (control) +S to save the metadata to the file.

Link | Posted on Jun 20, 2017 at 11:14 UTC
In reply to:

stevez: Ordered mine a week ago and I'm hoping for the free filters. I'll probably sell the OLY 7-14 ..... too big and heavy for the system, plus you can't add filters to it. The manual and calibrated focus scale will nice to have again for astrophotography.

I researched filter adapters and found them too expensive for just the occasional use of ND filters. For me, the Loawa is all about the size and weight since I do a lot of hiking and bike riding. Personally I'd prefer an f2.8 or f3.5 version at a lower price, but the f2.0 will be nice for a bit of astro work. What I'm really hoping for is good performance with my infrared converted camera, since the 7-14 is awful, having really bad hot spots.

Link | Posted on May 7, 2017 at 10:54 UTC

Ordered mine a week ago and I'm hoping for the free filters. I'll probably sell the OLY 7-14 ..... too big and heavy for the system, plus you can't add filters to it. The manual and calibrated focus scale will nice to have again for astrophotography.

Link | Posted on May 4, 2017 at 18:58 UTC as 5th comment | 4 replies
On article Throwback Thursday: Our first cameras (392 comments in total)

Showing my age here with a Kodak Brownie Holiday camera, followed many years later with a Konica Auto S2. The KM25 slides from that camera were as good or better than my parent's Leica, and those slides still look as good as the day they were shot.

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2017 at 12:38 UTC as 36th comment

I still have mine and use it for microscope work. Awesome little camera.

Link | Posted on Feb 2, 2017 at 22:57 UTC as 44th comment
In reply to:

stevez: I too am surprised at how large this lens is. Considering that its almost identical in size, weight and dimension as my Nikkor 300mm AFS f4, I can't help but think that Olympus might be considering a full frame mirrorless down the road. Another thought is that the lens was designed with an overly large image circle in order to assure excellent edge to edge sharpness. Hmmmm?

You guys of course are all right. Not sure what I was thinking. Probably this persistent head cold has fogged my brain.

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 17:01 UTC

I too am surprised at how large this lens is. Considering that its almost identical in size, weight and dimension as my Nikkor 300mm AFS f4, I can't help but think that Olympus might be considering a full frame mirrorless down the road. Another thought is that the lens was designed with an overly large image circle in order to assure excellent edge to edge sharpness. Hmmmm?

Link | Posted on Jan 6, 2016 at 16:01 UTC as 22nd comment | 26 replies
On article Fujifilm X100T successor rumored to feature new lens (336 comments in total)

A collapsible 24-70 f3.5 would be nice. f3.5 to keep it compact.

Link | Posted on Aug 26, 2015 at 12:34 UTC as 76th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

leuallen: I have successfully used Marumi CPL filters so I got a variable density one. Mistake. Lens lost all semblance of sharpness visible even on the LCD.

Larry

I agree. I've tried several brands of variable ND filters and all of them have resulted in poor image quality (detail) when set to anything darker than 6 stops of ND.

Link | Posted on Feb 19, 2015 at 13:06 UTC
In reply to:

stevez: Wonderful article and very well written as. Canon an Nikon are not stupid from a marketing perspective. I think they both have pro CSC lenses and bodies on the drawing board but are just waiting for a more significant drop in DSLR sales. Only time will tell if that's a mistake. Personally, I couldn't wait and dumped over 20 DSLR lenses and bodies for one of the pro mirrorless systems. Absolutely no regrets.

I switched to Olympus MFT, chswofford. Many bodies and lenses. Getting rid of 20+ years of Nikon stuff paid for most of it.

Link | Posted on Feb 12, 2015 at 02:05 UTC

Wonderful article and very well written as. Canon an Nikon are not stupid from a marketing perspective. I think they both have pro CSC lenses and bodies on the drawing board but are just waiting for a more significant drop in DSLR sales. Only time will tell if that's a mistake. Personally, I couldn't wait and dumped over 20 DSLR lenses and bodies for one of the pro mirrorless systems. Absolutely no regrets.

Link | Posted on Feb 11, 2015 at 16:51 UTC as 225th comment | 3 replies
On article Nikon D750 Review (2020 comments in total)

Nicely done DPR. I especially like that you've tested other cameras besides the D750 and found similar results. I remember on rare occasion finding unusual flare even on my D700. Makes me glad I've switched to mirrorless with none of those flare or focus issues.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2015 at 14:33 UTC as 179th comment | 2 replies
On article UPDATED: Real-world samples: Sony Alpha 7 II in Kauai (227 comments in total)

I like that you've shown a large variety of images with different lighting, lenses and exposure combinations. CA is virtually nonexistent at least to my eye. Colors are very natural although I'm not overly impressed with the level of detail, mostly in low contrast areas. I suspect that may be the JPEG engine?

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2015 at 13:23 UTC as 20th comment | 1 reply
On photo ISO-100-DSC01462 in dpreview review samples's photo gallery (14 comments in total)

I like that you've shown a large variety of images with different lighting, lenses and exposure combinations. CA is virtually nonexistent at least to my eye. Colors are very natural although I'm not overly impressed with the level of detail, mostly in low contrast areas. I suspect that may be the JPEG engine?

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2015 at 13:22 UTC as 4th comment | 1 reply
On a photo in the Sony Alpha 7 II in Hawaii sample gallery (14 comments in total)

I like that you've shown a large variety of images with different lighting, lenses and exposure combinations. CA is virtually nonexistent at least to my eye. Colors are very natural although I'm not overly impressed with the level of detail, mostly in low contrast areas. I suspect that may be the JPEG engine?

Link | Posted on Jan 19, 2015 at 13:22 UTC as 4th comment | 1 reply
Total: 74, showing: 1 – 20
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