Almazar80

Lives in United States United States
Has a website at wmllamas.com
Joined on Jun 22, 2006

Comments

Total: 92, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Sony a7 IV initial review (1569 comments in total)
In reply to:

Almazar80: I think that the pricing for the A7IV reflects the reality that component cost, transportation cost, labor cost have all risen markedly in the last few years.

TSMC and other foundries are increasing prices in the coming year. By substantial amounts. If you look at component pricing, prices are or are slated to go up by at least seventeen percent on most of the components used in modern electronic equipment. This is a reflection of higher transportation cost and higher materials cost, as well as higher energy costs. So if you look at camera pricing, the new cameras will probably end up being priced higher than the previous generation - just to compensate for the higher manufacturing and transportation cost. So suppose the cost of the production cost of the camera went up by seventeen to twenty percent (for manufacturing, transportation, component, etc.). Is it a surprise that the newer version of a camera that sold for $2000 US is now closer to $2500?

I don't think the price is unreasonable with the features you are getting. Do I wish it was cheaper? Yes. Unfortunately, additional features take money to develop and with the increase in material, labor, transportation costs, the price hike is inevitable. Besides, in a year, Sony will probably have some sort of promo discount. Of course, that still has not happened with the A7C cameras. Which is fine with me, since I want the A7IV on the A7C form factor. And with those customizable dials, tri navi is almost back. And please, Sony, it does not hurt to put a front dial. On the A7C cameras and on the A6600 class cameras.

Link | Posted on Nov 1, 2021 at 18:37 UTC
On article Sony a7 IV initial review (1569 comments in total)

I think that the pricing for the A7IV reflects the reality that component cost, transportation cost, labor cost have all risen markedly in the last few years.

TSMC and other foundries are increasing prices in the coming year. By substantial amounts. If you look at component pricing, prices are or are slated to go up by at least seventeen percent on most of the components used in modern electronic equipment. This is a reflection of higher transportation cost and higher materials cost, as well as higher energy costs. So if you look at camera pricing, the new cameras will probably end up being priced higher than the previous generation - just to compensate for the higher manufacturing and transportation cost. So suppose the cost of the production cost of the camera went up by seventeen to twenty percent (for manufacturing, transportation, component, etc.). Is it a surprise that the newer version of a camera that sold for $2000 US is now closer to $2500?

Link | Posted on Oct 29, 2021 at 15:33 UTC as 26th comment | 6 replies
In reply to:

jhunna: This trio JUST misses the mark. First off they should have been f2.0, next the ranges should have been 24, 40, 65 or 75. Then they would have been the MUST have trio without competing in any real way with existing Sony lenses.

I don't have an issue with the price, sharpness or quality of the glass, but I have the f1.8 lenses which are only a bit bigger than these cupcake lenses, matter of fact a 35 f1.8 in the same form factor as the 20/1.8 would make this trio almost not needed.

F2.8 to f2.5 is also about 1/2 stop of a difference. A little less, but the lenses are small, good performing and feature packed. I think the price may be a tad high, but after using the plasticky 45mm 1.8 Samyang, I could go for something small but substantial feeling.

Link | Posted on Aug 25, 2021 at 10:22 UTC
In reply to:

jhunna: This trio JUST misses the mark. First off they should have been f2.0, next the ranges should have been 24, 40, 65 or 75. Then they would have been the MUST have trio without competing in any real way with existing Sony lenses.

I don't have an issue with the price, sharpness or quality of the glass, but I have the f1.8 lenses which are only a bit bigger than these cupcake lenses, matter of fact a 35 f1.8 in the same form factor as the 20/1.8 would make this trio almost not needed.

The difference between 2.5 and 2 is only slightly more than 1/2 stop. That's not too bad, if the lenses perform well. And they do. Choice is a good thing. I have the Samyang 45mm 1.8 but I think the 50mm 2.5, with the aperture ring, button and MF/AF selector will convince me to switch.

Link | Posted on Aug 24, 2021 at 21:35 UTC
On photo The Huntley Triple Stack in the A Big Year - Birds 2021 challenge (2 comments in total)
In reply to:

cjf2: Great event captured well. It was amongst my favourites in the challenge. Such a shame the Heron's bill is tucked behind the tree stump.

Thank you. I was lucky enough to see the three birds in the same space. It was a great opportunity. The spoonbill is not normally in this part of the U.S.. It is still lingering in the Huntley Meadows wetlands, however. Now joined by a white ibis.

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2021 at 18:11 UTC
On article Tamron announces 17-70mm F2.8 for Sony APS-C cameras (340 comments in total)

Thank you Tamron.

Link | Posted on Dec 3, 2020 at 19:22 UTC as 22nd comment

It's never good to hear that you have higher revenues than expected and at the same time experience higher loss than expected. The cost cutting announcement and streamlining is what you expect to hear. I hope Nikon is successful in their turnaround plans.

Link | Posted on Nov 7, 2020 at 04:08 UTC as 68th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Funny Valentine: Olympus announced exiting south korea a few weeks before selling the imaging division. Things aren't looking good for Sony, probably they will sell their imaging division (alpha cameras) soon. The writing is on the wall, Sony can't succeed where Samsung failed. Just look how much superior Samsung technologies are compared to Sony, in both Smartphones, TVs, audio.

Canon was always going to be the big competitor to Sony. And Nikon as well. For all the hoopla, Panasonic is till not doing the business Canon, Sony or even Nikon is doing.

There was a period of time in which Sony lost its mojo. When Hirai took over, Sony started its comeback. They're profitable when other companies are not.

BTW, Samsung products work well, but best technology? I think there was a time when Sony didn't quite know what to do. Samsung phones are now too expensive for most people (the flagships). Apple makes far more money on mobile phones than any other company out there, especially when viewed as a percentage of market share.

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2020 at 21:03 UTC
In reply to:

Funny Valentine: Olympus announced exiting south korea a few weeks before selling the imaging division. Things aren't looking good for Sony, probably they will sell their imaging division (alpha cameras) soon. The writing is on the wall, Sony can't succeed where Samsung failed. Just look how much superior Samsung technologies are compared to Sony, in both Smartphones, TVs, audio.

Actually, that is not quite true. The GDP of the countries in the world have increased markedly since the Great Depression. In 1929, the nominal GDP of the United States was around 100 billion U.S. Today, the nominal GDP of the United States is about 22 trillion dollars (all in an annual basis). The debt to GDP ratio is an all time high, partly because of the cost of stabilizing the economy due to the COVID-19 emergency. It is higher now than the post WWII years. Realistically, the national debt is very high, but debt ratios for almost every county in the world has deteriorated over the years and yet the worldwide economies have continued to expand. It's not just the ratio that indicates the financial health of a country. Economic output is also an important measure and the U.S., while affected by the pandemic, is not in the same boat as we were post depression. Economic output is not nearly as depressed as it was then.

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2020 at 20:07 UTC
In reply to:

Funny Valentine: Olympus announced exiting south korea a few weeks before selling the imaging division. Things aren't looking good for Sony, probably they will sell their imaging division (alpha cameras) soon. The writing is on the wall, Sony can't succeed where Samsung failed. Just look how much superior Samsung technologies are compared to Sony, in both Smartphones, TVs, audio.

So with JP Morgan closing their personal banking business in Brazil, JP Morgan Chase is in dire straits and about to go down in flames? I imagine that if JP Morgan is in trouble, the whole financial market is in trouble. Coupled with the pandemic, we are set to experience a calamity that will make Great Depression seem like a small hiccup in history of the world. I am using the logic that you are using for this assessment.

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2020 at 19:19 UTC
In reply to:

matsonfamily: what worries me is that Sony produces the sensors for many others [such as Fuji] and this article indicates that Sony isn't doing well.

This is a localized closure of a set of operations in one country. Sony is managing the pandemic as well as can be expected. The sensor business is separate from the electronics products (well, that is actually changing). To say that they are not doing well is not an accurate depiction of what the article is saying.

The article does say that they will continue to offer warranty service to these products. Unfortunately, there may be some issues with doing business in Brazil, as a function of expected profitability. Did you know that JP Morgan is exiting the personal banking business in Brazil. That's Chase and company. If these conglomerates are exiting the market in Brazil that we are not aware of.

Link | Posted on Sep 18, 2020 at 19:17 UTC

Applaud Pentax for thinking different. Hopefully, there's room for them in the market.

Link | Posted on Jul 18, 2020 at 04:31 UTC as 107th comment
In reply to:

Osa25: So haviIng wasted billions of taxpayers money on drones that cost tens and hundreds of dollars these guys escalated warfare all over the world.

The result is other people innovating with off the shelf consumer drones.

And now more taxpayer money will be shovelled at people who are experts in over engineering and underthinking.

But no the country “can’t afford” a national living wage or healthcare. Because obviously it’s more important to burn money on these sorts of things.

Look at the budget request for FY2020. Over $100B for research and development, including almost $1B for AI research, more for autonomous vehicle development, $2.6B for hypersonic weapons, etc. With the Russians and Chinese developing hypersonic weapons, it would not be a good idea to keep up work that will ensure the safety of the country. We could break it down further, but you want to look predominantly at the policing and peace keeping actions, which are not the major components of the expenditures. The R&D actually ends up providing a lot of technology useful in civilian life. DARPA has funded a lot of research, leading to products and technologies such as the internet, advances in cognitive science, advances in OS design and implementation (Multics), etc.

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2020 at 03:50 UTC
In reply to:

Osa25: So haviIng wasted billions of taxpayers money on drones that cost tens and hundreds of dollars these guys escalated warfare all over the world.

The result is other people innovating with off the shelf consumer drones.

And now more taxpayer money will be shovelled at people who are experts in over engineering and underthinking.

But no the country “can’t afford” a national living wage or healthcare. Because obviously it’s more important to burn money on these sorts of things.

What makes you think I don't read these articles that you keep harping on. Here's the deal. Read stuff from a wide variety of sources, not just from sources that you're familiar with. Perspective is a good thing to have. Let's look at Afghanistan, for example. The U.S. supported a corrupt, ineffective leader (Karzai) for years. It didn't win a lot good will with many people in Afghanistan, but try as it might, the U.S. still has a certain responsibility to maintain a semblance of peace in the world. When the U.S. did nothing, the Taliban and al Queda used that isolated part of the world to train militants that wreaked havoc around the world. The activities of the U.S. military helped curtail that type of activity and in some ways, helped the people of Afghanistan. Girls are more educated now than before, there are at least parts of the country in relative calm with some semblance of prosperity. Maybe not commensurate with the expense, but positive changes have happened.

Link | Posted on Feb 27, 2020 at 03:34 UTC
In reply to:

Osa25: So haviIng wasted billions of taxpayers money on drones that cost tens and hundreds of dollars these guys escalated warfare all over the world.

The result is other people innovating with off the shelf consumer drones.

And now more taxpayer money will be shovelled at people who are experts in over engineering and underthinking.

But no the country “can’t afford” a national living wage or healthcare. Because obviously it’s more important to burn money on these sorts of things.

You really need to understand what the actual budget expenditures are and dissociate them with your own biases and beliefs. Some of the biases may be valid, but if you want to be informed, be informed. Study what you are talking about and then talk about it. Random pronouncements that have very little to do with actual reality is a disservice to people who listen and believe the same inane nonsense and it does you no good. The best way to change things is to be factually informed about the things you care about and to try to divorce it from incendiary and trite diatribes. And work to make it better and convince people why your cause is just.

Link | Posted on Feb 26, 2020 at 16:16 UTC
In reply to:

Osa25: So haviIng wasted billions of taxpayers money on drones that cost tens and hundreds of dollars these guys escalated warfare all over the world.

The result is other people innovating with off the shelf consumer drones.

And now more taxpayer money will be shovelled at people who are experts in over engineering and underthinking.

But no the country “can’t afford” a national living wage or healthcare. Because obviously it’s more important to burn money on these sorts of things.

Just as an FYI, U.S. government outlays on social security, medicare and Medicaid for FY2019 is about 2.3 trillion dollars. Defense spending (which includes troops, research and development, construction and upkeep of facilities, modernization, etc.) was about 676 billion. The portion of the budget going to Medicare alone is higher than the entire defense expenditure. Now, there isn't any excuse for unnecessary wars, but at least look at the numbers before pontificating. And as an earlier poster said, defense spending has been fairly steady percentage of the budget for a very long time.
BTW, Medicare fraud wastes a lot of money in the country. A lot of the fraud happens in states where industries have died and people are desperate to survive. With no industry to support them, jobs are not available. We need to address this problem.
Raising the minimum wage will hasten the onset of the robotic age.

Link | Posted on Feb 25, 2020 at 13:11 UTC
In reply to:

Deardorff: No dealers at all in our State. A minimum of a 6 hour drive to get to an Out of State camera store that has Canon camera gear.
Negative side is the only actual Camera store that carried a number of brands closed more than a year ago. Some that call themselves "camera stores" but don't carry much at all. "we can order it in for you" - but I can do the same through B&H and similar and get better prices. WalMart "camera center" is not a camera store - and we do have a WalMart only 90 minute drive away.
And don't even try buying B&W film in North Dakota...

We are lucky here in Northern Virginia. We have several full fledged (and thriving) camera stores and several of the Best Buys in the area stock a lot of camera gear. Now that the tax advantage that online retailers used to enjoy is gone, these stores are getting back business that they used to have.

Link | Posted on Feb 22, 2020 at 15:54 UTC
In reply to:

Almazar80: Still a good camera, but overpriced for what it is by $200-300 U.S. If this cost less, it would be rated higher. As it is, get the A6400. The best of the current generation of A6xxx cameras. Come on, Sony. Update the ergonomics. I would prefer tri navi to a front dial. Make it a little larger, have it feel like a real rangefinder. You can do it. You can pattern the next generation on the RX1 cameras. That would be sweet.

It's high, because its competitors are just as good in some things, even though they are older units and thus at a lower price point.

Link | Posted on Nov 28, 2019 at 18:55 UTC

Still a good camera, but overpriced for what it is by $200-300 U.S. If this cost less, it would be rated higher. As it is, get the A6400. The best of the current generation of A6xxx cameras. Come on, Sony. Update the ergonomics. I would prefer tri navi to a front dial. Make it a little larger, have it feel like a real rangefinder. You can do it. You can pattern the next generation on the RX1 cameras. That would be sweet.

Link | Posted on Nov 28, 2019 at 14:04 UTC as 70th comment | 3 replies
On article Updated: Sony a6600 sample gallery (65 comments in total)

I do think the A6600 is overpriced, although it is a capable camera. With the XT-3 at roughly the same price, the A6600 shold be priced at $1100 body only, not $1400. At $1100, it's a great bargain. As it is, the A6400 is the best bargain in Sony's current APS-C portfolio, at $800 for the body.

I like the camera, but I'm not buying it. The A6400 does almost the same thing (except for the battery and IBIS). Since the A6400 is going to be glued with a telephoto zoom for birding (that is stabilized), it is priced right. Sony can do better. And while this is a good camera, it's not the best in class. Discount it $300 and it can be the best bargain.

Link | Posted on Nov 8, 2019 at 17:08 UTC as 18th comment | 3 replies
Total: 92, showing: 1 – 20
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