jalywol

jalywol

Lives in United States Capital District, NY, United States
Joined on Sep 10, 2005

Comments

Total: 142, showing: 1 – 20
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I think you will be very happy with your choice. M43 is a lot of fun to use, and a joy to travel with. Enjoy it!

One piece of advice: Dig deep and consider the PL 100-400mm. In spite of variable reviews, it is just a wonderful lens (long lenses require very good technique, and that tends to confound a lot of folks who have not worked with one before). In terms of size and flexibility, it would really be a fantastic addition to your kit on a once-in-a-lifetime trip like this.

It was my most used M43 lens for several years, but I sold it to dabble in FF for a bit. I ended up missing it greatly when I wanted to go long again, and bought another. It's great to have it back again!

Link | Posted on Jul 5, 2021 at 01:10 UTC as 181st comment

I have the micro-Nikkor 55mm f3.5 non-AI version (1976), which was the immediate predecessor of the one you have evaluated here. I bought mine about 10 years ago for use, adapted, on my first M43 camera. It was amazing. Now, after all this time, and through a whole lot of mirrorless bodies, from M43 to Sony FF and Canon FF, it is one of only two legacy lenses that I have ended up keeping, and still use.

I would not consider this an "average" legacy lens, by any stretch of the imagination, and I am not surprised yours did well even on the high MP FF sensor.... :)

PS: The only other legacy lens I have kept was a Yashica ML 50mm f1.7. It apparently, from what I have read, is extremely similar to its Contax counterpart, and it is optically exceptional. It's also one of the very few legacy lenses that I have tried that does not have major halation wide open, and it has lovely rendering.

Link | Posted on Feb 9, 2021 at 03:15 UTC as 62nd comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

jalywol: I came round to a similar conclusion about measured lens attributes when I purchased a couple of early M43 lenses that were tested to be very sharp and very highly rated/reviewed (based mostly on sharpness). Found their output too crunchy for my tastes.

The lenses I have really loved are not perfect on measured scales. Yet, they have outstanding qualities that make them just deliver images that please me.

I am sure the corner sharpness fanatics would fall down in a dead faint if they knew I preferred the Oly 12mm f2 (which does not behave all that well in corners on the 20MP M43 sensors) to the Panasonic 12-35mm f2.8 at 12mm (which has very good corner sharpness). Both are good...but the 12mm f2 has some kind of special sauce that makes its rendering just...beautiful. I rarely don't come back with a good shot or two when I take that lens out. The 12-35 is excellent....but no soul. I'll take weak corners if the lens has some magic otherwise....

Two things about the 12-40mm: It's physically longer than the 12-35mm, which wouldn't be that big a deal, except it's also front heavy. I found it unpleasant to use due to its forward center of gravity, especially on smaller M43 bodies. The other thing was that I just didn't care for its output. It's output is very sharp, but has that "crunchy" sharpness that some Oly lenses have, which I just don't care for. And, separately from that, I had some Panasonic M43 bodies with no IBIS, so the Panasonic lens with OIS was a better option on that score for me at the time.

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2020 at 16:33 UTC
In reply to:

jalywol: I came round to a similar conclusion about measured lens attributes when I purchased a couple of early M43 lenses that were tested to be very sharp and very highly rated/reviewed (based mostly on sharpness). Found their output too crunchy for my tastes.

The lenses I have really loved are not perfect on measured scales. Yet, they have outstanding qualities that make them just deliver images that please me.

I am sure the corner sharpness fanatics would fall down in a dead faint if they knew I preferred the Oly 12mm f2 (which does not behave all that well in corners on the 20MP M43 sensors) to the Panasonic 12-35mm f2.8 at 12mm (which has very good corner sharpness). Both are good...but the 12mm f2 has some kind of special sauce that makes its rendering just...beautiful. I rarely don't come back with a good shot or two when I take that lens out. The 12-35 is excellent....but no soul. I'll take weak corners if the lens has some magic otherwise....

You missed my point. I don't care about corners, ergo my appreciation of the 12mm f2 even though it is softer in corners than the 12-35mm. BTW, I had the 12-40mm and hated it. Sold it for the 12-35, which I prefer greatly.

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2020 at 07:17 UTC

I came round to a similar conclusion about measured lens attributes when I purchased a couple of early M43 lenses that were tested to be very sharp and very highly rated/reviewed (based mostly on sharpness). Found their output too crunchy for my tastes.

The lenses I have really loved are not perfect on measured scales. Yet, they have outstanding qualities that make them just deliver images that please me.

I am sure the corner sharpness fanatics would fall down in a dead faint if they knew I preferred the Oly 12mm f2 (which does not behave all that well in corners on the 20MP M43 sensors) to the Panasonic 12-35mm f2.8 at 12mm (which has very good corner sharpness). Both are good...but the 12mm f2 has some kind of special sauce that makes its rendering just...beautiful. I rarely don't come back with a good shot or two when I take that lens out. The 12-35 is excellent....but no soul. I'll take weak corners if the lens has some magic otherwise....

Link | Posted on Oct 27, 2020 at 02:30 UTC as 16th comment | 5 replies
On a photo in the Olympus 100-400mm F5.0-6.3 IS sample gallery (DPReview TV) sample gallery (1 comment in total)

ISO 2500? Why? Shutter speed of 1/2000? Should have bumped the ISO down and went with slower SS...not a moving target, you know.

Link | Posted on Aug 5, 2020 at 17:49 UTC as 1st comment
In reply to:

Calphate: is there something wrong with their JPG engine or it's just a bit soft even on a 20MP sensor?

Uh, no. These images are soft. I have two M43 bodies at the moment, and I have extremely sharp images taken with the PL 100-400 and the PL 50-200mm with the 1.4x TC. It's not the format that's making these soft....

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2020 at 06:51 UTC
In reply to:

Cargo: I think, no advantages over the Leica 100-400.

I was thinking the same thing. At least in this gallery, feather detail is very unimpressive, half the shots are pretty soft, and there is some questionable bokeh on bright reflections in the background of the water shots. Of course, technique matters with a lens this long, so that might be part of it...I will wait for a more comprehensive review, but I'm not wowed by what's in this gallery, at least.

Link | Posted on Aug 4, 2020 at 06:48 UTC

Still have the MX I got in 1981. Great camera.

Link | Posted on Jan 21, 2020 at 00:58 UTC as 34th comment
In reply to:

cdembrey: I'm a lifelong Canon user. I'll stick with my xxD DSLRs until there is a Pro crop mirrorless—you know a R-mount APS-C, complete with native APS-C primes.

I could buy a RP and use adapted EOS-S lenses, but what is the advantage of doing that?

This makes no sense. You've already got EF lenses, right? The EF-M adapter works flawlessly (unlike the adapters Sony has for their system), and you don't have to buy new lenses straight off the mark. In addition, the M bodies are small. RP mount APS-C are not going to be nearly as compact.

Honestly, I don't think Canon is going to go that way, at least in the near future, so unless you want to wait rather a long time, and spend a whole lot more $ for the same performance as you get in the M, then you aren't going to be getting a mirrorless Canon APSC anytime soon....

Link | Posted on Nov 23, 2019 at 16:53 UTC
In reply to:

Shadow9d9: The people crying as a response to this article exemplify why photography with cameras as a hobby will continue to die. We have the mostly elderly clinging to what they know and are comfortable with rather than changing with the times.

Silent shutter, ibis, 20fps, eye auto focus, live histograms, lighter and less bulky bodies, no lens calibration needed, less shutter rumbling, no loud click clacks. Mirrorless are far and away a better technology, but like usual, people are afraid of change. Clinging to the past rather than embracing new technology will continje to keep camera photography as a niche hobby that will continie to die. Meanwhile cell phones continue to leap headfirst into future technology and the rest of the world with it.

Oh geez, not more OK Boomer crap.

Here's the thing: Paradigm shifts are disturbing. As such, the automatic response to innovation, across every generation, is NO.

Early adopters are brave souls of ANY AGE who are willing to try new things, not only the young. It's their experiences that show the reluctant that new things might be ok, or even...better?

How about you go over to the M43 forum, and take a poll of the age of the camera owners there? Guarantee you it will be....elderly. They are there because mirrorless enabled them to ditch their heavy DSLRs long before any of the big camera companies dipped their toes into that market... and they've been singing the praises of it for years.

Link | Posted on Nov 11, 2019 at 01:37 UTC
On photo Peony in the Flowers up close. challenge (29 comments in total)
In reply to:

André BARELIER: Absolutely wonderful. Mountains, clouds, sun...This picture gives a lot of room for dreaming. It really makes me feel better! Congratulations, and thank you!
André

Thank you so much! :)

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2019 at 16:02 UTC
On photo Peony in the Flowers up close. challenge (29 comments in total)
In reply to:

tbcass: Fantastic, well done!!!!

Thank you !

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2019 at 02:36 UTC
On photo Peony in the Flowers up close. challenge (29 comments in total)
In reply to:

Traveller: Many people have told you this is a great image...great in conception and execution. Add me to the list of admirers. Traveller

Thanks very much!!

Link | Posted on Sep 10, 2019 at 02:35 UTC
On photo Peony in the Flowers up close. challenge (29 comments in total)
In reply to:

kaphinga: Awesome shot! Congratulations!

Thanks!!

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2019 at 23:35 UTC
On photo Peony in the Flowers up close. challenge (29 comments in total)
In reply to:

yyr: Congrats! It's a delicious shot and a well deserved win for an image that drew my eye from the forum front page.

Thank you :) !!

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2019 at 23:35 UTC
On photo Peony in the Flowers up close. challenge (29 comments in total)
In reply to:

Wormsmeat: Wow - a landscape in petals. Great work Janet.

Yeah, I liked that it had that feeling to it, too :) .

Thank you!

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2019 at 23:35 UTC
On photo Peony in the Flowers up close. challenge (29 comments in total)
In reply to:

(unknown member): Somewhat Georgia O'keefe-esque and that is a compliment. Very cool.

Thank you !!

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2019 at 23:34 UTC
On photo Peony in the Flowers up close. challenge (29 comments in total)
In reply to:

CelticOdyssey: Well deserved- sumptuous image.

Thank you!!

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2019 at 16:11 UTC
On photo Peony in the Flowers up close. challenge (29 comments in total)
In reply to:

tko: Amazing. Looks like clouds over the mountains.

Thanks, yeah, I liked that about it myself. Peonies are pretty large, so it gave me more room to experiment with it when I was shooting, for sure.

Link | Posted on Sep 9, 2019 at 16:11 UTC
Total: 142, showing: 1 – 20
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