Alberto Tanikawa

Alberto Tanikawa

Lives in United States NY, United States
Works as a Customer Service Rep
Joined on Apr 25, 2001

Comments

Total: 79, showing: 1 – 20
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I once checked a Pelican 1650 because I was sick of baggage handlers breaking my soft suitcases. The people at the check-in booth referred me to security, where they asked if I was military. I wasn't. They said oversized luggage normally incurs overcharge, but because I was flying on New Year's eve they let it slide. And I had no damage to my luggage. All my photo gear travelled with me on a Pelican 1510 I had at the time ;-)

Link | Posted on Aug 18, 2017 at 18:05 UTC as 197th comment
In reply to:

Alberto Tanikawa: A curved sensor would not reduce vignetting, or improve peripheral illumination from lenses. That is dictated by the lens design itself. Light fall-off towards the edges will be exactly the same whether on a flat sensor, or elevated by a few millimeters on a curved sensor. More modern lens designs mitigate the need for such sensors. Not to say they are useless, far from it. Matching a telescope to a specific curved sensor should make coma a thing of the past.

Thanks for your insights Jon, I'm not an optical engineer, mostly a technicaly inclined shooter. I definitely see the benefits of this technology, and I hope to see it applied to a future product purchase someday :)

Link | Posted on Jul 15, 2017 at 14:46 UTC
In reply to:

Alberto Tanikawa: A curved sensor would not reduce vignetting, or improve peripheral illumination from lenses. That is dictated by the lens design itself. Light fall-off towards the edges will be exactly the same whether on a flat sensor, or elevated by a few millimeters on a curved sensor. More modern lens designs mitigate the need for such sensors. Not to say they are useless, far from it. Matching a telescope to a specific curved sensor should make coma a thing of the past.

As it has been mentioned in other comments, curved sensors don't make sense for ILCs or zoom lenses. This is where I was coming from. In a known, invariable focal length geometry, this makes perfect sense to match the optics with a specific curved sensor.

As far as vignetting, yes microcells help reduce it to some degree. One can go to DXO Mark and compare the same lens on different bodies, and sometimes see vastly different amounts of vignetting. But the fact remains that a lens will always project vignetting to some degree at the sensor. Curving the edges will do nothing to increase light. Only perhaps having custom lens profiles built into cameras, and then applying signal amplification at the analog stage accordingly. What Canon and Nikon do with lens profiles is likely post A/D conversion, so you induce a certain amount of posterization around the edges. I'm not knocking this technological accomplishment, just want people to be better informed about vignetting.

Link | Posted on Jul 14, 2017 at 02:35 UTC

A curved sensor would not reduce vignetting, or improve peripheral illumination from lenses. That is dictated by the lens design itself. Light fall-off towards the edges will be exactly the same whether on a flat sensor, or elevated by a few millimeters on a curved sensor. More modern lens designs mitigate the need for such sensors. Not to say they are useless, far from it. Matching a telescope to a specific curved sensor should make coma a thing of the past.

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2017 at 03:32 UTC as 9th comment | 14 replies

Really mesmerizing!

Link | Posted on Jun 21, 2017 at 21:50 UTC as 18th comment
On article Why would I want an external recorder/monitor? (70 comments in total)
In reply to:

Alberto Tanikawa: I've acquired a SmallHD DP4 for my video newbie endeavors, and although it has served me well, I feel the need to upgrade it. The Atomos Shogun Inferno seems to fit the bill nicely. It should also fit nicely in my rig. Which will eventually lead to further upgrades down the line: a better video camera than my current Nikon D7100, beefier fluid head and tripod, wireless mics, external battery pack... And we thought still photography was expensive.

rfsIII, I'm definitely keeping the D7100 for stills, but I'm eyeing the Panasonic GH5 with a Metabones Ultra to use my Nikkors. All manual focus, so I'm not worried about any AF issues/non-issues the GH5 has. The Shogun Inferno would initially be used for monitoring only, but should I ever need to record DCI 4K in 10-bit 4:2:2, I should be set.

You bring a good point about iphones/androids for recording the talent remotely. I don't do any live streaming, and dialog can be synced in post.

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2017 at 18:10 UTC
On article Why would I want an external recorder/monitor? (70 comments in total)

I've acquired a SmallHD DP4 for my video newbie endeavors, and although it has served me well, I feel the need to upgrade it. The Atomos Shogun Inferno seems to fit the bill nicely. It should also fit nicely in my rig. Which will eventually lead to further upgrades down the line: a better video camera than my current Nikon D7100, beefier fluid head and tripod, wireless mics, external battery pack... And we thought still photography was expensive.

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2017 at 02:53 UTC as 4th comment | 3 replies

I hope that offsets this accounting mishap of nearly half a billion dollars:

http://uk.mobile.reuters.com/article/idUKKBN19008R

Different division, but a company has to balance its books sonehow.

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2017 at 22:22 UTC as 32nd comment | 3 replies
On article First shots from new Nikon 28mm F1.4E ED (224 comments in total)

Nice photos, and congrats to Nikon on another lens that's sure to become a classic. I still shoot with my 24/1.4G, which is my favorite lens and focal length. And it works very well in APS-C video shooting on a rig. On occasion I do see some onion bokeh with point light sources, and that's due to the aspherical elements. I hope Nikon has improved on the aspherical elements on this new lens, but it's a rare occurance, and you really have to go out of your way to make this happen.

Link | Posted on Jun 1, 2017 at 01:31 UTC as 65th comment

I love the piston innovation, but I would have liked more counterbalance capacity. My rig's already at ~14-16 pounds depending on lens. I hope the lithium battery is user replaceable, but it would've been nice if it used rechargeable AA or AAA instead. But is that just for powering the illuminated bubble level, or is there something else that requires power?

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 18:27 UTC as 7th comment | 1 reply

As much as I like Manfrotto products, I'm not a fan of soft cases. The exterior material always gets chewed up by concrete or other pavement materials, and becomes torn. I understand hard cases are heavier, but I can just muscle my way up stairs without worry of tearing the exterior fabric material. Even if these resolve the bottom wear problem, zippers and the whole soft case deform much sooner than a hard case.

Link | Posted on Sep 26, 2016 at 19:26 UTC as 16th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Tieu Ngao: Compared with the G1 MTF this G2 MTF is significantly better at 600mm:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHiKm3UesK8#t=785.345553
at minute 13:05

Optically the G2 has a slight edge, but VC is where the G2 really outdoes the original. It feels closer to the 70-200 VC when shooting at 600mm.

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2016 at 21:59 UTC
In reply to:

Via Lactea: arca swiss plate, thumbs up for that

It has dual 1/4"-20 sockets at the bottom of the tripod collar as well. It balances well on a Nikon D610 without tipping forwards or backwards.

Link | Posted on Sep 21, 2016 at 21:47 UTC

At least this phone has a 3.5mm audio jack. The rumors of Apple dumping the audio jack in the next iPhone make me consider moving to Android.

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2016 at 02:57 UTC as 3rd comment | 1 reply
On article Virtual Reality: It's not just for gamers anymore (140 comments in total)

How about taking this further? Entire movies could be produced in such manner that people would go multiple times to see the same movie, just to see what they missed the first time around. A Blu-ray VR version of the movie would make a killing too. Just my two cents :)

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2016 at 01:57 UTC as 20th comment
In reply to:

Alberto Tanikawa: Positioning the light right next to the lens will give the same/similar red eye or eye glow we get on our smartphones. Better to mount it off camera whenever possible.

A light right next to the lens is an issue with both stills and video. An iphone with its light on during video capture of a crowd in a dark environment will reveal many blue/white glowing eyes in the crowd.

Link | Posted on Jan 25, 2015 at 01:49 UTC

Positioning the light right next to the lens will give the same/similar red eye or eye glow we get on our smartphones. Better to mount it off camera whenever possible.

Link | Posted on Jan 22, 2015 at 19:56 UTC as 13th comment | 3 replies
On article Lytro software update introduces Focus Spread feature (104 comments in total)

Wow, this is really getting interesting. I can only imagine the possibilities of a Super 35 or Fullframe sized light field sensor, and be able to shoot 4:4:4 4K video footage that could be post adjusted for focus. The raw video file would be ginormous! ;-)

Link | Posted on Dec 11, 2014 at 07:00 UTC as 25th comment
In reply to:

Alberto Tanikawa: If one is so worried, use a magnetized driver so the screws come off with the driver, and don't fall on the sensor. People start to patch together all manner of adapters and parts into flimsy rigs, or no rigs at all, then complain when the camera that wasn't designed for said use breaks - and breaks predictably. The A7 and A7r were initial extensions of the NEX line if memory serves me right, so the two part composite mount was a carryover design. Sony replaced the mount on the A7s with a single metal piece - that is just evolution of the design, be glad Sony did that.

No one is stopping anyone interested in this product from acquiring it, but having said so, you replace the mount at your own risk. A good technician would notice signs of tampering (if you put the original parts back, and didn't give it to your cats), so if you bring the body in for "warranty repairs", be aware that your repair may not be covered by the warranty.

And btw, when the guy says "really good screwdriver", for Japanese products such as cameras and other electronics, you want to use JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) drivers. He clearly used the wrong phillips Wiha driver for the job. Wiha doesn't make JIS drivers - trust me, I looked - but they are indeed a "really good screwdriver" brand ;-)

Link | Posted on Oct 20, 2014 at 05:54 UTC

If one is so worried, use a magnetized driver so the screws come off with the driver, and don't fall on the sensor. People start to patch together all manner of adapters and parts into flimsy rigs, or no rigs at all, then complain when the camera that wasn't designed for said use breaks - and breaks predictably. The A7 and A7r were initial extensions of the NEX line if memory serves me right, so the two part composite mount was a carryover design. Sony replaced the mount on the A7s with a single metal piece - that is just evolution of the design, be glad Sony did that.

No one is stopping anyone interested in this product from acquiring it, but having said so, you replace the mount at your own risk. A good technician would notice signs of tampering (if you put the original parts back, and didn't give it to your cats), so if you bring the body in for "warranty repairs", be aware that your repair may not be covered by the warranty.

Link | Posted on Oct 20, 2014 at 05:30 UTC as 26th comment | 1 reply
Total: 79, showing: 1 – 20
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