noirdesir

Lives in Switzerland Switzerland
Works as a Engineer
Joined on Nov 4, 2006

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Total: 870, showing: 21 – 40
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On article Review: Nikon D7500, speed and capability (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

tecnoworld: Incredible how a lower performance camera in 2017 can get almost the same votation of the higher performing NX1 2.5 years ago.

I'm not saying the D7500 is bad, which is not. I'm rather saying the NX1 should have scored in the 9x and not in the 8x.

Perhaps that would have helped samsung selling its cameras? Who knows, perhaps not, but it would be nice to be evaluated correctly (compared with other cameras reviewed here).

Any scoring system for multi-faceted products that goes beyond one significant digit is flawed.

Link | Posted on Jul 7, 2017 at 16:39 UTC
On article Review: Nikon D7500, speed and capability (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

BadScience: nearly every camera reviewed here is scored about 85% give or take a few.

Before even reading the article, knowing NOTHING about the camera, I guessed "this will be 85%"; so I click on the conclusion first .... and I was (almost) right.

The reviews either need to dump scores or bring in some sort of normalisation. They have become meaningless, as admitted by DPR

"taken on its own, this overall rating figure has little real 'meaning',"

Yet it is the biggest, boldest feature of the conclusion, and the only numeric value.

I managed to read the whole review without really noticing the score (ie, if you had asked me, I would not have been able to tell you what it was). One could almost say that if you notice the score (or even take it seriously), that's your problem.

Link | Posted on Jul 7, 2017 at 16:37 UTC
On article Review: Nikon D7500, speed and capability (449 comments in total)
In reply to:

GabrielZ: "No touchscreen touchpad AF with eye on viewfinder" Really! This is a DSLR not a MILC. The viewfinder's optical, with the sensor covered by the mirror when in use. How would touchpad AF work? The standard multi-directional pad is better for that situation anyway.

It would work the same way a trackpad works on a computer.

Link | Posted on Jul 7, 2017 at 16:32 UTC

The flash being so bright is done to model the experience people have when a flash is fired in a dark environment.

Link | Posted on Jul 1, 2017 at 00:21 UTC as 80th comment
In reply to:

matthew saville: OK, I get it. Some folks just want superzoom reach.

But why have we hit a wall at 16mm / 18mm?

Am I the only landscape / travel photographer who would KILL to have a 11-110mm APS-C "superzoom"? Or heck, I'd settle for a 12-60mm. Or a 13-60mm. Whatever is optically possible and doesn't weigh a brick-and-a-half.

Until that day, I'll stick with a 10-24 and a 55-200/300 for APS-C travel. You can keep your 400mm reach.

You can ask this question in a different way as well: Why is there no wide-angle zoom that goes beyond 35 mm? Canon has a 17-40 mm that just goes a bit beyond that and Nikon had announced an 18-50 mm (fixed lens 1" compact) but then later decided not to ship it.

Link | Posted on Jun 23, 2017 at 09:15 UTC
In reply to:

Arca45Swiss: Manual focus ?

Chromatic Aberrations-free.

Link | Posted on Jun 22, 2017 at 11:52 UTC
In reply to:

msstudio: Knowing Vincents brilliant photography I can see where he comes from and how it's a great tool for him and other that work like this.
The fun part with this solution starts with exposure time, at 24fps that's 1/48s, resulting in blury single images (not an issue for any movie), shooting 60fps solves a lot of this but tends to make the motion look a bit strange. Next up, you get 36mpx in your horizontal image (the chip has nearly 1:2 ratio) now unless you shoot video sideway, you need to crop your vertical image from this very wide Frame, so the whole interchangeability is not universal, and in that scenario, results in a medium res photo (4320pix high). Workflow is another often overlooked issue. Ever tried to edit a RED capture to find the single image, storage and time requirements can not be underestimated and are truly a PITA....And last, you can't sync it with a strobe, which some photo genres rely on.
So as usual, horses for courses.

The frame rate does set a lower limit to exposure time if you don't want you video to look terribly choppy.

Link | Posted on Jun 21, 2017 at 18:16 UTC
In reply to:

Arca45Swiss: Manual focus ?

Zeiss as a third-party lens maker (ie, after the Contax era), has released its lenses as part of distinct lens lines.

The Z-line (ZF/ZM/ZK) of FF manual focus DSLR lenses started in the first decade of this century and began with updated designs of lenses for manual focus Contax SLRs.

Zeiss then added the Touit line of AF APS-C mirrorless lenses and the Batis line of AF FF mirrorless lenses as well as the Loxia line of manual focus FF mirrorless lenses (I think starting off with designs based ZM lenses).

In FF DSLR area, it added the very high-end Otus line of manual focus lenses and the Milvus line of more affordable manual focus DSLR lenses (essentially slowly replacing the ZF/ZE lines. Some Milvus lenses are simply re-housed ZE/ZF lenses, some are new optical designs. Zeiss still sells lenses from the ZE/ZF line that have not yet received a Milvus successor.

So, yes, the lens name is a label that tells you what's in the box (FF vs APS-C, MF vs AF).

Link | Posted on Jun 21, 2017 at 17:45 UTC
In reply to:

FlyinDoc: I believe DPReview does not give enough weightage to video and video AF when reviewing ILCs (the clue maybe in the name of the site).

But really, video's importance is only growing by the day and photo cameras are astoundingly capable for video as everyone already knows. So many people are using these cameras even professionally for video, as proved by the growth of the GH line of Panasonics.

My point being equal importance should be given to video and video AF when recommending and scoring these cameras. If you do that, the Fuji XT2 and A6500 leap ahead of the Nikon D500 IMO.

Maybe, I'll have to wait for this site to change to Digital Photography & Video Review, before that happens.

I don't know, I really think I have never used the video features on any of my digital cameras (I once tried to document something at work with it but ended up using time-lapse and I once tried to do a 12 h 'surveillance' video but memory card size and power supply issues let me switch using my laptop camera).

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2017 at 19:05 UTC
In reply to:

FlyinDoc: I believe DPReview does not give enough weightage to video and video AF when reviewing ILCs (the clue maybe in the name of the site).

But really, video's importance is only growing by the day and photo cameras are astoundingly capable for video as everyone already knows. So many people are using these cameras even professionally for video, as proved by the growth of the GH line of Panasonics.

My point being equal importance should be given to video and video AF when recommending and scoring these cameras. If you do that, the Fuji XT2 and A6500 leap ahead of the Nikon D500 IMO.

Maybe, I'll have to wait for this site to change to Digital Photography & Video Review, before that happens.

I was about to say, 'What numerical scores?'. If you had asked me whether I had seen any numerical scores, I would have said no. In other words, when I read the individual camera pages, I don't even notice that there are numerical scores.

Link | Posted on Jun 16, 2017 at 14:09 UTC
On article The first photo shared from a phone just turned 20 (21 comments in total)
In reply to:

Impulses: Nicely produced clip... They had Ethernet in the delivery room in '97 tho? Lucky him, I didn't escape 56K until I graduated and went off to college in 2000, also the year I got my first digicam, Kodak DC290... Still the most expensive too.

The article wasn't written very clearly on this aspect ("[...] with a his flip phone rigged up to the laptop [...], the system was ready [...]. His laptop was connected to a server at home.").

BTW, my mobile internet usage also dates back to only a few years after that, using IR to tether my phone to my laptop, using basic GSM at 9600 bit/s.

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2017 at 19:53 UTC
On article The first photo shared from a phone just turned 20 (21 comments in total)
In reply to:

Impulses: Nicely produced clip... They had Ethernet in the delivery room in '97 tho? Lucky him, I didn't escape 56K until I graduated and went off to college in 2000, also the year I got my first digicam, Kodak DC290... Still the most expensive too.

No, the cellphone was used as a wireless modem for the laptop to connect the laptop to the internet. The logic to use the photo uploaded by the laptop to a server and embed it into an email was running on the home computer (connected to the internet via a fixed-line modem most likely).

Camera -> tethered to laptop via cable -> laptop tethered to cellphone via cable -> cellphone using mobile phone network to connect to server on the internet -> home computer connected to internet and thus image-hosting server via presumably a fixed-line modem -> email sent from home computer via modem incl. link to image on server.

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2017 at 13:40 UTC
In reply to:

photog4u: Long live Fuji-kon!

A good discussion at Nikonrumors points to Nikon shopping around its precision unit (steppers, silicon chip making machines) which has been loss-making for years and had to be kept afloat by the camera business. And several non-Japanese chip makers (CPUs, GPUs, memory chips, etc.) put in offers to prevent ASML to become the monopoly stepper vendor. And the the Japanese government encouraged some Japanese companies in the chip industry (and related industries), incl. Fuji, to put out offers as well.

Meaning something not really related to Nikon's camera business, except that Nikon's camera unit wanted to get rid of this drag on its finances.

Link | Posted on Jun 12, 2017 at 18:48 UTC
In reply to:

Pedro Moreira: About the same price as canon 8-15 which is constant f4

My only variable aperture zoom is in my RX100. What bugs me is that if I select anything between f/1.8 through f/4 at a shorter focal length, then zoom to the tele end, the f-stop automatically (and unavoidably) changes to f/4.9. But it then sticks at f/4.9 when zoom back out. Thus if you zoom around a lot and are somewhat light starved to wanting the fastest f-stop possible, you constantly have to re-adjust the f-stop.

Link | Posted on Jun 8, 2017 at 12:01 UTC
On article 2017 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras $900-1200 (476 comments in total)
In reply to:

M Chambers: So what they don't like about the A77 II are the low performance at high ISO and the "poor subject tracking." Ironically these are two main reasons why it's so amazing. Name an APS-C camera with better performance of these two features.

I'm sure some here will try.

Giving identical sensor technology, an APS-C SLT has low light performance closer to APS-C than m43.

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2017 at 16:33 UTC
On article 2017 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras $900-1200 (476 comments in total)
In reply to:

Jacques Cornell: "you can 'push' shadows pretty far, though not too much"
Um... What does this mean? Specifically?
There's a lot of vague subjective language in these reviews, and sometimes the choice to describe something as either a benefit or a weakness seems entirely random. It would be better to stick to facts and let readers draw their own conclusions.

The Olympus is listed as having 'good IQ' for both raw and JPEG. The Panasonic is only listed as having 'good raw IQ', ie, in other words, its JPEGs are not quite as good as the Olympus JPEGs. You might judge the quality different, but there is nothing nonsensical about such a description.

Not harping about the 16 MP with the Panasonic can easily be explained that the '16 MP' issue did not make it into the top three 'cons', whereas for the Olympus it did. Whenever you compile a short report card, there is always a somewhat arbitrary cut-off of what you put on the card and what you leave out.

Link | Posted on Jun 6, 2017 at 16:30 UTC
On photo Waiting for the next train (Baker Street, London, UK) in the Candid Street Photography challenge (10 comments in total)

I am known for not having any people in my travel/city photography and my instinct probably would thus be to have this scene without people in it. But I think in this example, only having the person on the right would have been the perfect balance.

I think I also have an explanation for this, to paraphrase Ming Thein, composition in photos guides the viewers gaze. Here, I think there is some tension between the two people in the shot, ie, your eyes wander between the two back and forth. Having only one person would allow the eyes to settle on one spot.

Link | Posted on Jun 3, 2017 at 17:42 UTC as 1st comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

CanonKen: If this was anywhere else, I would have read it as a joke. However, I don't consider the Swiss to be renown for their humor and turning a blind eye to the 'regulations'.

I've been living half my life in Switzerland (it's in my profile). Which gives me some perspective and I can certainly say that you don't get those occasional crazy local regulations here that can pop up in the U.S.. Switzerland might be one of most federal countries in Europe in regard to regional and local autonomy (outside of Belgium and Bosnia), but that doesn't mean that people can or would go nuts here. If anything, the local council might get in trouble for subverting the legislative process for comedic effect.

Have you ever seen a tourist bureau instructing people not to tell (or show) how beautiful their area is because they are concerned that others might be emotionally affected by seeing too much beauty? Have you ever seen any law or regulation that is concerned by people seeing too much beauty? It's almost the definition of satire and a regulation with such satire even on the bloody sign is therefore satire as well.

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2017 at 15:48 UTC
On article 2017 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras $900-1200 (476 comments in total)

I know these articles are based on existing ones, updated with new cameras (and new final conclusions), but you still update such passages like "The a6300 is arguably Sony's most sophisticated APS-C camera", which hasn't been true anymore since the a6500 was released.

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2017 at 10:54 UTC as 37th comment | 2 replies
On article 2017 Roundup: Interchangeable Lens Cameras $900-1200 (476 comments in total)

I'd still love to see a comparison table, ideally with green and red highlights (as it is done when comparing a camera in a review to its predecessors and peers). I know that it probably wouldn't fit into the normal article column width, but where there's a will there's a way.
Or at least add a link to comparison page based on DPreview's compare feature. Yes, I know, it is pretty simple for the readers to create that comparison view themselves, but the article author doing it once, versus thousands of readers each doing it themselves, is much more efficient.

Link | Posted on Jun 2, 2017 at 10:50 UTC as 38th comment
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