noirdesir

Lives in Switzerland Switzerland
Works as a Engineer
Joined on Nov 4, 2006

Comments

Total: 788, showing: 1 – 20
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On article 2017 Roundup: Compact Enthusiast Zoom Cameras (457 comments in total)
In reply to:

Rod McD: Pity we never saw the Nikon DLs to compare...... I'm still using an original Canon G1X despite its foibles. None of the tested cameras has tempted me to upgrade, side grade or possibly down-grade. The G1X MkII doesn't have an inbuilt VF - you only get one as an expensive accessory that can be lost or left at home and blocks the flash shoe. Bad idea. The Panasonics look good but lack zoom reach by just that bit too much.... And the tiny Sonys are overly menu driven, feel too small in my large hands, haven't got a grip and simply don't feel robust. There's plenty of room yet for manufacturers to perfect the enthusiast zoom compact.......

I am sure Nikon has made prototypes of the DL. Any such prototype might indeed have some historical value (in particular if it is a working prototype).

Link | Posted on Apr 24, 2017 at 20:15 UTC
On article Huawei P10 camera review (72 comments in total)
In reply to:

noirdesir: Why isn't the sensor size part of the 'Key Photographic Specifications'? I know that dual cameras and computational photography significantly shift what image quality we can expect from this phone, but still.

Neither does Apple, yet everybody knows the sensor size they use. This information is obtained in multiple ways. A simple one is if the actual focal length is reported in the EXIF data to compare that with the equivalent focal length. Beyond that, teardowns can reveal sensor product numbers as can developer documentation. And while not 100% guaranteed to be correct, leaked information from the supply side can also identify the sensor module product number. Sometimes information about the pixel size can be obtained (which can then be used to calculate the sensor size). Or either of those data is available for the preceding phone model and when essentially nothing changes in the camera specifications, it's a pretty safe bet that the sensor size hasn't changed either. The P9 seems to have a sensor size of 1/2.9" (and 1.25 μm pixel size).

And if you don't fully trust a source, it is always possible to use words like 'probably' or 'most likely'.

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2017 at 20:52 UTC
In reply to:

Sacher Khoudari: No Ethernet or Wifi? How can I access my data from my phone or tablet, when my PC is powered off?

I prefer to work on the internal drive (or an attached USB 3.0 drive) an NAS for long term storage + additional backups.

I once (10 years ago...) worked for a small company that used LaCie RAID NAS too. It was really plug and play, AFP worked great for at least 12 clients at the same time.

You prefer an attached USB 3 drive over an attached TB3 drive? There is a place for NAS and there is a place for DAS. But USB vs TB has very little to do with that.

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2017 at 13:00 UTC
In reply to:

Fazal Majid: Thunderbolt 3 (or even the original Thunderbolt) is completely wasted on bog-slow spinning rust hard drives. Now if they came up with an enclosure for SSDs like my 4x2.5" OWC ThunderBay 4 Mini (Thunderbolt 2, equipped with 2x2TB Samsung 850 EVO), I'd be more interested.

TB isn't wasted if you want to daisy-chain your devices. And TB3 in particular isn't wasted either if some or the sum of all your devices in the chain exceed TB2 bandwidth. Not to speak of things being simpler if all your TB devices use the same TB generation (no need for adaptors, no need to keep them in a particular order).

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2017 at 12:58 UTC
On article Huawei P10 camera review (72 comments in total)

Why isn't the sensor size part of the 'Key Photographic Specifications'? I know that dual cameras and computational photography significantly shift what image quality we can expect from this phone, but still.

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2017 at 12:46 UTC as 24th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Josh Leavitt: I'd love to see Samyang launch a fast manual focus portrait lens for the GFX. Something like a 110mm F1.2, essentially the equivalent of their EF mount 85mm F1.2. And it would be a really compelling choice if they could retail it for $1,499 USD.

This adage about a fast lens being better at a common stopped-down f-stop than a slower lens is more about correlation not causation. You could argue that to get decent quality wide-open, a faster lens has to be better optically at all f-stops than a slower lens. But once you have a two stop (or more) difference, the biggest contribution to the IQ wide-open comes from glass that is not 'used' (sees no direct light) at smaller apertures. Correcting the aberrations from those outer areas of the lens elements (those largely determining IQ wide-open) doesn't necessarily correct for aberrations caused by the inner areas of the lens elements (that determine IQ stopped down). There is some causal connection, eg, via the use of special, low dispersion glass, but a faster lens largely tends to be better stopped down than a slower lens at the same f-stop wide-open because it was designed to better.

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 12:52 UTC
On article Hands-on with the Panasonic Leica 8-18mm F2.8-4 (156 comments in total)
In reply to:

danieljcox: MFT's category Lumix and Olympus is giving us an impressive lens lineup. Moore's Law will eventually bring us the sensor we need and when it arrives, wow, the small cameras will be unstoppable. This lens should be stunning and at a fraction of the weight of my past 14-24mm F/2.8 Nikkor. Loved that lens but never carried it due to size and weight.

Moore's law can get us processing to the pixel itself (which could be used for reseting things when the pixel has reached its saturation capacity and thus allow lower base ISO and infinite dynamic range). Moore's law might also get even better image stabilisation. Moore's law can get us computational photography from panorama stitching to motion detection in multiple exposure merging and faux background blur.

Moore's law however cannot change the amount of light that is passing through the entrance pupil of a lens and for moving subjects, more light passing through the lens is the only thing that can allow for short enough exposure times to stop motion.

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 12:35 UTC
In reply to:

Arkienkeli: I suppose 23mm is a great lens, but the price seems quite high considering it is slow at only f/4 and the image circle is only slightly larger than many FF lenses already have (like Sigma Art series). New Nikkor 20mm f/1.8 goes for under $800 and Sigma Art 20mm and 24mm f/1.4 (!!!) for under $900 and $850, just for comparison.

You cannot divorce these two things: The lens is expensive for what it does on a technical level and it is expensive because it sells in much lower quantities than FF lenses.

As an aside, the current 50 MP MF sensor has a pixel size of 5.3 μm. The highest resolution current FF sensor have pixel sizes between 4.1 and 4.9 μm (5Ds, D8x0). A 100 MP 33x44 mm sensor would have a pixel size of 3.75 μm. On FF, the same pixel size would result in 62 MP. In general, that would put resolution requirements for FF shift lenses on a similar level as that for MF lenses.

As to which degree the current lenses fulfil those requirements is another question and one could argue that lens resolution requirements should be compared using the pixel sizes available at the time of release of a given lens.

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 11:01 UTC
In reply to:

Arkienkeli: I suppose 23mm is a great lens, but the price seems quite high considering it is slow at only f/4 and the image circle is only slightly larger than many FF lenses already have (like Sigma Art series). New Nikkor 20mm f/1.8 goes for under $800 and Sigma Art 20mm and 24mm f/1.4 (!!!) for under $900 and $850, just for comparison.

You can compare this with 24 mm 'FF' shift lenses which have a larger image circle than needed to cover FF. And even then, the Fuji lens ($2600) is more expensive (Canon $1900, Nikon $2200, Samyang $700) and that while it is slightly slower (f/4 vs f/3.5) and its image circle is actually smaller than that of FF shift lenses. Almost all 24 mm FF shift lenses have an image circle of 60+ mm. The GFX lenses only need a 55 mm image circle in comparison to cover 44 x 33 mm. Moreover, GFX lenses don't have to clear a mirrorbox and thus can use a less complex and less retrofocus design and they don't need to have the mechanics to allow for shift and tilt.

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 09:37 UTC
On article Hands-on with the Panasonic Leica 8-18mm F2.8-4 (156 comments in total)
In reply to:

dansclic: Again, 8 pages for 30 sentences. Couldn't you defitineley not present a hands on on ONE page ? What's the use of making 8 pages ?

Ever heard of Powerpoint presentations? Or things like video reviews? They don't put 30 sentences on one slide/view either.

This (slide) type of article allows for a high image to text ratio, can ensure that text and images that cover the same aspect are easily viewed together, doesn't put off people with a big block of text and can offer an easier navigation than scrolling *.

You might find those goals not to be worthwhile, but don't pretend you don't know why DPreview chose this format.

(*) In the vast majority of cases, people scroll text views way before they actually need to, ie, they ensure that their eyes never have to leave the top of the screen by bringing up the content from further down the page by scrolling frequently. This is done so you don't have to move your eyes too much but can keep them fixed on the top of screen.

Link | Posted on Apr 19, 2017 at 09:16 UTC
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S vs Pentax 645Z vs Hasselblad X1D (338 comments in total)
In reply to:

xupam: 14 pages?!? Really? Can't you really write more than a paragraph in each one?!?
It's such a crap design and so annoying!!!

I think the label DPreview uses for this format is 'slides' not 'pages'.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2017 at 14:13 UTC
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S vs Pentax 645Z vs Hasselblad X1D (338 comments in total)
In reply to:

PanoMax: One might also add such "High-end cameras" such as Alpa, Phase One and Seitz Roundshot to the list. My "dream camera" would probably be the Seitz Roundshot...mind you, it's only 200 megapixels!
There's one for sale on EBay... http://www.ebay.ca/itm/ROUNDSHOT-D3-360-DIGITAL-Panoramic-Camera-PC-Tablet-/370476723355

Sure, let's compare $8000-ish camera with $20'000-ish cameras.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2017 at 12:11 UTC
On article Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500: Which is better for you? (387 comments in total)
In reply to:

Stevyjb: I Just DO NOT KNOW what Nikon are thinking ! I Take it that they just don't want to SELL CAMERAS ANYMORE ! This is yet another camera update that Nikon has intentionally handicapped Performance and features from the previous Model ! Time to start looking elsewhere i Think !

Yeah, because 1) dual card slots, 2) battery grip support and 3) the Ai tab were the only three things that the D7x00 line had over the D3x00/5x00 lines. And compared to those three things, all the other 'non-existant' differences aren't worth $hit:
- 11 vs 39 vs 51 AF points;
- 95% vs 100% coverage viewfinder
- 0.82x vs 0.85x vs 0.94x magnification viewfinder
- pentamirror vs pentaprism viewfinder
- 1/4000 s vs 1/8000 s
- 5 vs 8 fps
- 2016 vs 160'000 pixel metering sensor
- dual dial control layout

I can tell you that I value any of those more than any of three features that were removed.

Link | Posted on Apr 14, 2017 at 12:07 UTC
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S vs Pentax 645Z vs Hasselblad X1D (338 comments in total)
In reply to:

Osa25: I would've like to see the Sigma DPQ series thrown in here in the comparison for good measure....

Detail, maybe. Dynamic range and low noise? Not really.

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2017 at 13:53 UTC
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S vs Pentax 645Z vs Hasselblad X1D (338 comments in total)
In reply to:

DenWil: I am surprised the 645Z's crop format (44x33 sensor paired with FF 645 lenses) is not worth mentioning- or did I miss that paragraph? I would expect an IQ difference compared to the native (to 44 x 33 format) lenses of the other two brands.

That FF 645 Pentax won't materialise until Pentax (and Sony) find a way to sell the FF 645 sensor in cameras costing less than $10'000.

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2017 at 13:51 UTC
On article Nikon D7500 vs Nikon D500: Which is better for you? (387 comments in total)
In reply to:

Stevyjb: I Just DO NOT KNOW what Nikon are thinking ! I Take it that they just don't want to SELL CAMERAS ANYMORE ! This is yet another camera update that Nikon has intentionally handicapped Performance and features from the previous Model ! Time to start looking elsewhere i Think !

Would you have preferred a price increase instead? Sales are going down, to keep the same ROI with lower unit numbers, they either need to increase the price or reduce the cost (only one card slot, lower-res display). Moreover, when the D7200 was released it was labelled as their DX flagship. Now that the D500 exists, they can move it downmarket a bit again.

Unless you also see the lower sensor resolution as 'crippling' (yeah, it is a 24 MP sensor crippled to 21 MP by firmware [/sarcasm]). Nikon clearly thinks it is the better sensor, otherwise they wouldn't have used it in their flagship DX camera, the D500.

Link | Posted on Apr 13, 2017 at 13:49 UTC
On article Nikon D7500: What you need to know (533 comments in total)
In reply to:

CaPi: Having used the D7100 in the past I was waiting for an update of the D7200 - a relase that appeared to me to be too minor an upgrade.
I also considered the D500 but found it rather expensive.
Well here we are - another update I would call minor update (apart from the excellent 20 MP sensor) at the Price Point very Close to the D500. :-(
I find myself wondering why I waited for this. It seems now that all new bodies no matter by what Company start close to 2k. How about a real spec bump?
Oh and I do wish Nikon all the best of success - some of my best work was done using their Equipment.

Since the D500 sensor so far is only used in the D500, its production numbers are much smaller than the 24 MP APS-C sensors. Re-using it in the D7500 might just be about amortising the development and production setup cost over a larger number of sensors. There could also be speed reasons (for Live View and video) that make it a better sensor.

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2017 at 13:25 UTC
On article Nikon D7500: What you need to know (533 comments in total)
In reply to:

CaPi: Having used the D7100 in the past I was waiting for an update of the D7200 - a relase that appeared to me to be too minor an upgrade.
I also considered the D500 but found it rather expensive.
Well here we are - another update I would call minor update (apart from the excellent 20 MP sensor) at the Price Point very Close to the D500. :-(
I find myself wondering why I waited for this. It seems now that all new bodies no matter by what Company start close to 2k. How about a real spec bump?
Oh and I do wish Nikon all the best of success - some of my best work was done using their Equipment.

So, on a high level what would constitute a real spec bump for you?
- Substantial metering sensor resolution increase? (Apparently not, going from 2016 to 180'000 doesn't seem to count)
- Doubling of the frame rate? (Increase by 33% from 6 to 8 fps apparently does not qualify)
- Adding a tilt & touch screen? (Doesn't seem to be considered as a real spec bump)
- Higher ISO rating? (Again, apparently not, the D7500 gets a one more stop of regular range and four stops of extended range)
- Adding Snapbridge?

That leaves:
- Noticeable increase in AF points and/or frame coverage?
- More MP?

Yes, I am being snarky but I know that even I look at those last two points and if they don't change, I think: 'Not much of a change'. But I am aware that this a bit of a silly reaction.

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2017 at 09:07 UTC
On article Nikon announces midrange D7500 DSLR (396 comments in total)
In reply to:

Henry McA: Their lack of innovation is mind boggling. Unless you NEEED 8fps and faster AF, the 7200 is still the better camera.

@entoman While having two card slots is nice and useful, testimonies of D7x00 users recording to both card slots in parallel (what is what you have to do to protect against card failure) are extremely rare.

Link | Posted on Apr 12, 2017 at 08:43 UTC
On article Fujifilm GFX 50S vs Pentax 645Z vs Hasselblad X1D (338 comments in total)
In reply to:

Reop: Why not mencioned Leica S?

And the current lenses for the Hasselblad H systems have been designed by and are manufactured by Fuji. In fact, the H system was originally co-developed by Hasselblad and Fuji and its first model was also sold under the Fuji brand in Japan.

Link | Posted on Apr 11, 2017 at 15:11 UTC
Total: 788, showing: 1 – 20
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