tlinn

tlinn

Lives in United States OR, United States
Has a website at www.flickr.com/tlinn
Joined on Dec 17, 2003

Comments

Total: 215, showing: 1 – 20
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In reply to:

Scottelly: We don't want to miss out on some of the profit we would make by making competitive cameras, so we'll just quit.

More opportuinity for Sony . . . and Fuji.

Meanwhile Sigma is expanding their camera business.

Fuji diversified into nutrition supplements, cosmetics, chemicals and other businesses when film died. They still do photography because the chairman is committed to it as a social good. The business is profitable mainly because of Instax though the X-system is in the black.

Link | Posted on Mar 28, 2017 at 16:14 UTC

Great app. I can't recommend it enough.

Link | Posted on Mar 17, 2017 at 19:17 UTC as 7th comment
In reply to:

tlinn: I've been surprised by the number of people who don't understand why this is newsworthy. Death Valley is a significant and increasingly popular photographic location in the U.S. with Badwater Basin being one of its major sites. While it is true that the salt flat is vast, there is only one easy access point with parking, exhibits, and a boardwalk to make it easy for everyone, young and old, to get out onto it and experience for themselves its stark beauty. This is where the van did its damage.

Maybe you don't shoot landscapes. Maybe you don't find wilderness beautiful. Hopefully you can still muster up enough empathy to appreciate why this is a significant and newsworthy event for the millions of people who love this place.

@Distagon18 I can appreciate your argument that this area really isn't wilderness per se but I think most understand my point. I would argue that making areas like Badwater accessible so that all can enjoy it is probably more responsible than anything else (except maybe photography) for the preservation of these places. And, yes, there will be wear and tear from being over-loved but that is entirely different than vandalism.

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2017 at 18:40 UTC
In reply to:

mbrobich: There's more damage caused by the amount of old cars still running in the U.S.

More damage to what?

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2017 at 03:03 UTC
In reply to:

Esstee: Hmmmm.
Am I missing something, or are people freaking out over tracks left in a deserted salt pit?

Yes. You're missing something.

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2017 at 03:01 UTC
In reply to:

Arastoo Vaziri: Please don't overreact: I don't condone what the bloke in the van did in any way, but the photograph of the van (not the one with it being removed) is far more interesting than the rather commonplace one with the creases.
And I wonder whether the towing vehicle tracks weren't even more harmful to the ground. Couldn't they have used an helicopter to remove the van?

Maybe if I were in a classier mood at the time of my original reaction to you, Suntan, I would have just asked what *you* mean when you use the term "entitled". I tend to assign a pejorative connotation to the term but I suppose it could be argued that if we as a society decide that a barren stretch of desert should be preserved then we are all entitled to expect it will be so. If, on the other hand, you are arguing a variation of "first world problems" I'm not sure that response matters.

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2017 at 03:00 UTC

I've been surprised by the number of people who don't understand why this is newsworthy. Death Valley is a significant and increasingly popular photographic location in the U.S. with Badwater Basin being one of its major sites. While it is true that the salt flat is vast, there is only one easy access point with parking, exhibits, and a boardwalk to make it easy for everyone, young and old, to get out onto it and experience for themselves its stark beauty. This is where the van did its damage.

Maybe you don't shoot landscapes. Maybe you don't find wilderness beautiful. Hopefully you can still muster up enough empathy to appreciate why this is a significant and newsworthy event for the millions of people who love this place.

Link | Posted on Mar 15, 2017 at 21:19 UTC as 30th comment | 3 replies
In reply to:

Donnie G: With Apple, you get what you pay for. The best! Cheap is what the other guys do. Deal with it. 😎

@Samuel C Calm down, fanboy. If I ever put my phone in my back pocket and sat on it you might have a point. You don't.

Link | Posted on Mar 15, 2017 at 18:29 UTC
In reply to:

Arastoo Vaziri: Please don't overreact: I don't condone what the bloke in the van did in any way, but the photograph of the van (not the one with it being removed) is far more interesting than the rather commonplace one with the creases.
And I wonder whether the towing vehicle tracks weren't even more harmful to the ground. Couldn't they have used an helicopter to remove the van?

Arastoo, it really doesn't matter how commonplace a particular comp is. It's protected and people who have never seen it as well as people (like me) who return every year should be able to expect that some idiot has driven through the middle of it.

Suntan, you get the Idiot Award for your comment. The person with entitlement issues is the moron who drove onto the salt flat.

Link | Posted on Mar 15, 2017 at 18:25 UTC
In reply to:

landscaper1: $5,000 and 6 months. Hardly seems sufficient punishment.

I just realized I haven't seen your P.O.S. van lately, Karroly.

Link | Posted on Mar 15, 2017 at 18:11 UTC
In reply to:

daddyo: If I were the van owner, I would simply insist that I originally parked the van at the edge of the salt flats, and that it obviously slid on its own to its resting place, just like the rocks in Death Valley that leave trails behind them.
Then I would create a diversion by acting incensed by the wanton destruction of the salt flats by the towing equipment.

Too soon...

Link | Posted on Mar 15, 2017 at 18:09 UTC
In reply to:

Donnie G: With Apple, you get what you pay for. The best! Cheap is what the other guys do. Deal with it. 😎

@G1Houston I suspect phips243 is referring to things like OLED screens, NFC capabilities, wireless charging and other state-of-the-art tech that shows up in Android devices years before making it into iPhones. For the record, I am a longtime iPhone user currently sporting a bent 6 Plus. (Thanks, Apple.)

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2017 at 20:09 UTC
In reply to:

Oclux: Rebuild it !

And have Mexico pay for it!

Link | Posted on Mar 9, 2017 at 19:58 UTC
In reply to:

tlinn: I am disappointed to read that they're sticking with X-Trans in the next gen X-T bodies. Particularly if there is an increase in resolution, this oddball CFA is more trouble than it's worth.

To be clear, I did NOT say or imply that you couldn't get good results from Fuji cameras. I own several.

The X-Trans CFA is a tradeoff. Theoretically, it offers slightly better noise performance along with reduced aliasing at a cost of additional demosaicing complexity, a partial loss of software compatibility/support, and reduced color resolution. As sensor resolution increases, the benefit of reduced aliasing (its primary selling point) is diminished while the demand on the camera's processor actually increases and the other disadvantages remain. So it is my opinion that the benefits are not justified by the accompanying problems at this pointβ€”and certainly not at resolutions of 30MP or more which is likely where a next gen sensor would land.

As an aside, it is worth noting that Fuji's highly regarded colors are completely unrelated to X-Trans. No one is arguing that the GFX is hamstrung by the lack of an X-Trans CFA in terms of color or IQ.

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2017 at 23:52 UTC

I am disappointed to read that they're sticking with X-Trans in the next gen X-T bodies. Particularly if there is an increase in resolution, this oddball CFA is more trouble than it's worth.

Link | Posted on Feb 24, 2017 at 20:24 UTC as 20th comment | 5 replies
In reply to:

Donnie G: Nikon takes a one-time loss of $1Billion, primarily due to their restructuring of their business, and now everybody here thinks that spells doom and gloom for the company. Well, think again folks, because Nikon will be around for a long time to come. However, they do have some work to do in order to put this hiccup behind them. 😎

@lightpainterx You may be right but their challenge has nothing to do with the quality of their products. More than anything it has to do with a shrinking market.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2017 at 21:32 UTC
In reply to:

nicoboston: On the positive side, the "sluggish and shrinking market" is actually very good news for those who like good cameras, like playing with cameras, and like taking better pictures. Or are trying to take better pictures. If Nikon and others give up, the offer will shrink and only the best will survive. Kind of natural selection. What do you think?

I "take pictures" with my phone but it doesn't even remotely resemble the pleasure of using a real camera, including a good compact.

The other part of the equation is that R&D cost will have to be spread out over fewer units meaning generally higher prices. We can already see prices going up rather than down in the latest generation of camera bodies and lenses. The price of Olympus' E-M1 Mk II is nearly double that of the original. Fuji's X-T2 is more than a third higher than the original. Some of this has to do with exchange rates but definitely not all of it.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2017 at 21:28 UTC
In reply to:

Tactical Falcon: Smart move by Nikon. They need more relevant profitable products. How about smart phone lenses and accessories and more? Forget about following thel Go Pro model with the fail Mission cameras.

They need to ride the wave of sharing, and social connection. That is where the action is. Imagine a 1 inch Nikon sensor phone with one of the smartphone heavyweights. The camera that is with you, is the one you share with. My DSLR stays at home allot more than my S7.

@Don Sata I would feel better about that plan for survival if Nikon used their own sensors. Although I don't deny that Nikon contributes to the IQ produced by their cameras I think it is still fair to say that anyone has access to the general level of sensor performance available in Nikon cameras via Sony's semiconductor division. In my mind, Nikon's advantage is with their focusing systems, their vast base of legacy lenses and mindshare. Will this be enough to preserve Nikon's camera division in its current form? I think that is anyone's guess.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2017 at 21:20 UTC
In reply to:

Donnie G: Nikon takes a one-time loss of $1Billion, primarily due to their restructuring of their business, and now everybody here thinks that spells doom and gloom for the company. Well, think again folks, because Nikon will be around for a long time to come. However, they do have some work to do in order to put this hiccup behind them. 😎

There have been whispers and off-the-record comments for years now about Nikon's tenuous financial situation. I don't imagine that they'll disappear overnight but if someone from the future told me that, in ten years, they'll be a division of Sony I wouldn't have to sit down from shock. Don't get me wrong; I wish Nikon the best. But it seems like wishful thinking to suggest this little "hiccup" represents the entirety of the challenge Nikon is facing.

Link | Posted on Feb 14, 2017 at 20:46 UTC
On article Adobe Creative Suite 6 has been officially retired (351 comments in total)
In reply to:

tlinn: While I understand the concern of many who worry that Adobe will pull the rug out from under LR perpetual license customers, this move doesn't make that event any more likely. This is the predictable culmination of the announcement Adobe made almost four years ago. Adobe has said or done nothing since to signal a change in policy on LR and perpetual licenses.

I imagine that someone arguing the opposite position would point out that LR CC does retain some functionality relating to image management even if the subscription is cancelled.

I've said this elsewhere in this thread so I won't repeat it in full but it is the fact that I lose the ability to re-edit past work should I cancel my subscription that is the real deal killer for me. I don't wish to be put in a position where Adobe can extort whatever they want to should I need more than read-only access to my own work, be it stills or video.

Link | Posted on Jan 31, 2017 at 03:39 UTC
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