TheBlackGrouse

Joined on Aug 21, 2015

Comments

Total: 60, showing: 1 – 20
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And this is good company behavior: apologizing, fixing the issue and replacing the lenses.

Link | Posted on Apr 10, 2021 at 00:17 UTC as 18th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Zvonimir Tosic: So, if one is trying to photograph running ostrich or cassowary, which setting should be used on E-M1X: motorcycles, or birds?

@Tosic, Jackdaw, Welsh and Tosic again... you all really made me laugh. I'm a visual type of person so when reading I see these raptors, centipedes and ducks immediately, including a desperate photographer trying to choose between motorcycle, train or bird setting :-)

Link | Posted on Dec 26, 2020 at 01:51 UTC
In reply to:

TheBlackGrouse: Ok, I have watched the video, saw some ducks, geese and herons that are impossible to miss, some high contrast small birds in the snow and I saw the camera struggle with a slow free flying crow and one sitting in a tree. In all these situations my Canon 7DII hits immediately. It also locks on really challenging subjects like hunting Hobbies, Merlins or Swifts. The only thing this video tells me: the Olympus is not suitable for shooting birds.

Can't believe it's that bad. Show some good examples of bird tracking and let an experienced wildlife shooter do it. I really like your videos at DPR but this review is a joke.

It's not my intention to be negative about the Olympus, maybe it's a good wildlife camera, we haven't seen it in the video.

@Mr Bolton, yes the segment with the flying crow. A wildlife camera should pick up a bird of less than 100 pixels, then you know it's good. Besides, bird photographers need record shots of distant rare birds. The stills were excellent but too easy for a wildlife camera, they don't proof anything. Show us a diving Peregrine Falcon at half a mile, that's more like it. And for that you need an experienced wildlife photographer.

@Halftrack, I'm not saying it's not suitable. I'm saying that the video gives this impression. Olympus deserves a good review.

Link | Posted on Dec 25, 2020 at 15:27 UTC

Ok, I have watched the video, saw some ducks, geese and herons that are impossible to miss, some high contrast small birds in the snow and I saw the camera struggle with a slow free flying crow and one sitting in a tree. In all these situations my Canon 7DII hits immediately. It also locks on really challenging subjects like hunting Hobbies, Merlins or Swifts. The only thing this video tells me: the Olympus is not suitable for shooting birds.

Can't believe it's that bad. Show some good examples of bird tracking and let an experienced wildlife shooter do it. I really like your videos at DPR but this review is a joke.

It's not my intention to be negative about the Olympus, maybe it's a good wildlife camera, we haven't seen it in the video.

Link | Posted on Dec 24, 2020 at 21:11 UTC as 19th comment | 9 replies
On article Canon EOS R5 review (2961 comments in total)
In reply to:

TheBlackGrouse: Great camera, no doubt.

However, Canon introduced the 1DXIII for action shooters knowing their mirrorless cameras were not good enough for the Olympics.

Sports and wildlife shooters are still waiting for the 7DIII for the same reason. We don't have anything against mirrorless cameras but we need a tool that can do the job. EVF is not good enough yet, battery life is terrible as you need the highest refresh rates for shooting action.

@need of a unique name
The 7D series was not that strange. Almost all wildlife shooters had/have one. No matter if they have a 500/600 mm, when cycling or hiking for hours they leave these big whites at home and choose more compact and lighter lenses like the 100-400 II. It's not just the lens, you need a completely different backpack and a tripod with heavy head too. The guys with the big whites park their car and walk hundred yards to a hide. Hides are fun, one-two hours a day, but not when it's your only destination.

Link | Posted on Oct 22, 2020 at 07:36 UTC
On article Canon EOS R5 review (2961 comments in total)
In reply to:

TheBlackGrouse: Great camera, no doubt.

However, Canon introduced the 1DXIII for action shooters knowing their mirrorless cameras were not good enough for the Olympics.

Sports and wildlife shooters are still waiting for the 7DIII for the same reason. We don't have anything against mirrorless cameras but we need a tool that can do the job. EVF is not good enough yet, battery life is terrible as you need the highest refresh rates for shooting action.

Admittedly, you make a strong case. Diving terns are really difficult.

For me the 1DXIII was/is a serious option, it's very expensive but it is a solid action shooting AF-monster with a modern sensor that will be supported for many years. The downside, not enough pixels for cropping.

Don't know what to do, my 7DII will hold for a year (or two), the last two years I didn't buy any gear, like many wildlife photographers. We are waiting.

Since a 7DIII has become more and more unlikely I will start searching the internet for R5 reviews made by bird photographers.

Link | Posted on Oct 22, 2020 at 00:06 UTC
On article Canon EOS R5 review (2961 comments in total)
In reply to:

TheBlackGrouse: Great camera, no doubt.

However, Canon introduced the 1DXIII for action shooters knowing their mirrorless cameras were not good enough for the Olympics.

Sports and wildlife shooters are still waiting for the 7DIII for the same reason. We don't have anything against mirrorless cameras but we need a tool that can do the job. EVF is not good enough yet, battery life is terrible as you need the highest refresh rates for shooting action.

Fair enough, if it comes from a former 7DII owner :)

My style is shooting action and I'm talking about fast flying falcons, swifts, things like that. No Zone-AF is capable of that, it's almost impossible with a full-frame and 600 mm. This is not the stable setup with tripod and gimbal next to a sports field, this is a moving photographer trying to get the best position, shooting hand-held, hiking for hours.

However, I'll read more reviews and posts on the mirrorless forum. The R5 is quite expensive but it saves me a 5DIV that was already planned. Enough pixels for cropping, not the same reach but ok.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2020 at 22:26 UTC
On article Canon EOS R5 review (2961 comments in total)

Great camera, no doubt.

However, Canon introduced the 1DXIII for action shooters knowing their mirrorless cameras were not good enough for the Olympics.

Sports and wildlife shooters are still waiting for the 7DIII for the same reason. We don't have anything against mirrorless cameras but we need a tool that can do the job. EVF is not good enough yet, battery life is terrible as you need the highest refresh rates for shooting action.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2020 at 15:04 UTC as 227th comment | 11 replies
On article Canon RF 600mm F11 real-world samples (387 comments in total)
In reply to:

TheBlackGrouse: This gallery is a disgrace. This is not a landscape lens, it's for shooting wildlife. Then you may expect shots made by an experienced wildlife photographer of distant subjects. Moving, flying, running, swimming animals shot by someone who knows what he's doing. Only then you get an idea of what this lens is capable of.

For instance look at image 7 and 8. These are at best record shots if the birds are rare. Only an idiot would place them in a gallery to show the quality of him/her self, the camera and/or the lens.

Yes, it's slow but this lens is made for wildlife, the occasional planespotter and people shooting the moon. The majority will be wildlife shooters. In that case you may expect shots of distant animals that show the capabilities of this lens. This gallery shows nothing other than lack of contrast and color. It's about simple questions like, is this lens suitable for flying birds? Of course my 100-400 II is better but for long distance hiking this may be a lightweight option.

Link | Posted on Aug 26, 2020 at 13:14 UTC
On article Canon RF 600mm F11 real-world samples (387 comments in total)

This gallery is a disgrace. This is not a landscape lens, it's for shooting wildlife. Then you may expect shots made by an experienced wildlife photographer of distant subjects. Moving, flying, running, swimming animals shot by someone who knows what he's doing. Only then you get an idea of what this lens is capable of.

For instance look at image 7 and 8. These are at best record shots if the birds are rare. Only an idiot would place them in a gallery to show the quality of him/her self, the camera and/or the lens.

Link | Posted on Aug 26, 2020 at 00:40 UTC as 40th comment | 3 replies
On photo Polar night in the Olympus m/43 challenge (3 comments in total)

Beautiful, why do I have a Canon :-)

Link | Posted on Jun 24, 2020 at 11:04 UTC as 2nd comment
On photo DSC05042-Edit in the A big year - birds 2020 challenge (14 comments in total)
In reply to:

PhotoTeach2: Very Well Timed shot ... May I ask if it was a "single" shot or did you use (A9-advantage) a fast-frame rate to get it ???

I like the way the mouse is silouetted, and the way the top bird has his head down ... the only way the shot could be better is the birds were actually "separated" instead of over-lapping.

In fact, the overlapping makes the shot special. The birds are touching each other. I have thousands of flying raptor images but the most spectacular are when they are fighting, exchanging food or when a pair is close together.

Many pictures on the internet are of combined shots, to show more birds. This one must be real, it's almost impossible to get these wing positions. And the harmony between the wings adds to the image. Really well done.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2020 at 11:18 UTC
In reply to:

Mariano Pacifico: Kenya is now infected so will other African nations. Infection spreads fastest in economically challenged countries. It is impossible to lock down a continent. We will be overtaken by COVID19 before someone found a cure

Yes, we can limit the number of deaths by slowly building up herd immunity so vulnerable people will be better protected. But still, a total lock-down only flattens the curve to help our health care system cope with Corona.

On average we have 3000 deaths in a flue season. Corona will kill ten thousands of people, even with social distancing, half of the companies closed as well as schools, universities, bars, restaurants, hotels, shops etc. Borders are closed, there are hardly any flights, public transport is very limited, all sports events and other are cancelled. Our economy is not functioning anymore and still the virus is spreading. Hopefully, a vaccin will be ready soon. Otherwise older people have to be socially isolated for years.

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2020 at 11:10 UTC
In reply to:

Mariano Pacifico: Kenya is now infected so will other African nations. Infection spreads fastest in economically challenged countries. It is impossible to lock down a continent. We will be overtaken by COVID19 before someone found a cure

It will spread, you can't stop it anymore. You can only slow it down and hope there is a vaccin in the meantime.

Like Ebola, the only way to deal with something like this is to isolate the place where it starts to let it die out. Yes, you need the army to shoot anyone who tries to leave that place. Unacceptable of course but this is the alternative.

Luckily, this virus does not kill us all. There will be a next one, much more deadly. Let's hope our leaders have learned something.

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2020 at 07:34 UTC
In reply to:

Brian P Smith: I was a heavy user and believer of filter systems until I finally realized that in this day with Lightroom/Photoshop, I don't have any need for graduated filters. I get by just fin with Circular ND's and a polarizer which are cheaper, and take up MUCH less space in my hiking bag.

Maybe if I look to US landscape images... many rocks and calm, but here we have wind, lots of leaves, reed and moving water. Combined images, even with faster shutter speeds, give problems. Besides, using filters is fun.

Link | Posted on Mar 20, 2020 at 08:42 UTC
On photo DSC_9952 in the Flying challenge (3 comments in total)

Well deserved first place. These herons are not tame animals, this isn't easy. The photo is taken just before the bird lands. Which makes you wonder where that is since no land or branch is visible. Possibly this is shallow water. Anyway, it adds something to the image.

Link | Posted on Mar 11, 2020 at 00:55 UTC as 3rd comment

The good-old Lowepro Photo vest does the job for outdoor shooters at 1/8 of the price.

Link | Posted on Feb 16, 2020 at 16:05 UTC as 25th comment
In reply to:

Spectro: Mental health, think Aaron may have been sociopaths or a psychopaths to easily hide what he did without feeling remorse like a normal person and to carry in like that.

Not to start an argument but do you mean normal people kan kill without guilt, remorse, regret? For instance in a self defense situation? Or after years of sexual abuse, being traumatized and to prevent new attacks?

We call it murder when it's planned, on purpose, for money only, things like that. Maybe there is a difference between countries in how these words are used.

Link | Posted on Jan 24, 2020 at 00:24 UTC
In reply to:

Iron Eagle: The more of these photography contest winners I see, the more it seems that about 80% of getting amazing shots is just being in the right place at the right time. The rest is how good you are at post processing, and the small remainder is actual skill. Not to say any of these photogs aren't talented, but I think many of us on the forum could've shot these, had we only been in the same place.

That said, nice gallery overall! Much better than the recent Nikon contest I remember seeing several months ago.

Also, now that I know jaguars will be blocked, I'm totally against the wall. NOT! If that is that cost of keeping out illegals, so be it.

@Iron Eagle. When in a hide, we shoot the same subjects. There is always a huge difference between the images of photographers with the same gear. Some have 100 keepers in a few hours, others not even one.

Link | Posted on Oct 21, 2019 at 01:06 UTC
On photo Zilverreiger in htimm1948's photo gallery (1 comment in total)

Grote Zilverreiger, om precies te zijn :-)

Link | Posted on Oct 19, 2019 at 16:21 UTC as 1st comment
Total: 60, showing: 1 – 20
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