aglake

aglake

Lives in United States Groton, MA, United States
Works as a Retired Software Quality Engineer
Joined on Jan 1, 2014

Comments

Total: 7, showing: 1 – 7
On article 12 Things Not To Do When Buying Your First Film Camera (236 comments in total)
In reply to:

tomnorth: I agree with most everything you wrote, with the exception of not starting with a completely manual film camera. I'm not saying you should absolutely only get a completely manual film camera to start out, but I don't think you should shy away from one. Often times the first camera available to you is one that's been sitting in a closet with someone in your family. It might just be a manual camera. I do believe that an ideal first film camera would include aperture priority metering mode. I'm less a fan of shutter-speed priority. I also believe that an ideal first film camera would make it easy to meter manually strictly looking through the viewfinder. That's a situation where the Canon AE-1 falls down, that and it's shutter-speed priority.

I'm not sure that I completely agree with insisting on aperture priority. My film camera (the first that I got in 1978 and the one I still use) is the Canon EF - the predecessor to the AE-1. It displays the shutter speed on the bottom of the viewfinder and aperture on the right side of the viewfinder. If I want a specific aperture, then I adjust the shutter speed until I get it. Because both values are displayed in the viewfinder and the shutter speed is easy to adjust while looking through the viewfinder, I consider that both modes are available to me.

Link | Posted on May 30, 2020 at 22:39 UTC
In reply to:

Joey Bagodonuts: I'd like to see some examples where the Canon is placed just above the monitor.

Here is what my setup looks like: https://pbase.com/cichallenge/image/170708236

Link | Posted on May 14, 2020 at 18:38 UTC
In reply to:

aglake: I use it with my 80D (with 24mm pancake) with no problems in both Zoom and Microsoft Teams. It's proved to be a life saver for me. With my 80D and 27" screen, things are pleasant again.

Last February I built a powerful desktop to replace my aging laptop. The laptop's webcam never worked and I didn't miss it so I didn't include a webcam in my new system. Now webcams are scarcer than toilet paper.

While my phone works, staring at a tiny screen for an hour or more was very tiresome.

I have a tripod that, when the legs are fully retracted, just lifts the camera up over the monitor. Since the monitor is a big flat panel, there is room behind it for the tripod. It does mean that the monitor is pulled a little bit farther forward than I'd like but I don't find that to be a real problem.

The camera is not much higher than a webcam mounted on the top of the screen.

Link | Posted on May 14, 2020 at 17:29 UTC
In reply to:

aglake: I use it with my 80D (with 24mm pancake) with no problems in both Zoom and Microsoft Teams. It's proved to be a life saver for me. With my 80D and 27" screen, things are pleasant again.

Last February I built a powerful desktop to replace my aging laptop. The laptop's webcam never worked and I didn't miss it so I didn't include a webcam in my new system. Now webcams are scarcer than toilet paper.

While my phone works, staring at a tiny screen for an hour or more was very tiresome.

I have a tripod that, when the legs are fully retracted, just lifts the camera up over the monitor. Since the monitor is a big flat panel, there is room behind it for the tripod. It does mean that the monitor is pulled a little bit farther forward than I'd like but I don't find that to be a real problem.

The camera is not much higher than a webcam mounted on the top of the screen.

Link | Posted on May 14, 2020 at 17:29 UTC

I use it with my 80D (with 24mm pancake) with no problems in both Zoom and Microsoft Teams. It's proved to be a life saver for me. With my 80D and 27" screen, things are pleasant again.

Last February I built a powerful desktop to replace my aging laptop. The laptop's webcam never worked and I didn't miss it so I didn't include a webcam in my new system. Now webcams are scarcer than toilet paper.

While my phone works, staring at a tiny screen for an hour or more was very tiresome.

Link | Posted on May 14, 2020 at 13:19 UTC as 58th comment | 3 replies
On article Throwback Thursday: Our first cameras (401 comments in total)

My very first camera was a Brownie Super 27. It used 127 roll film and had a built-in flash (for flashbulbs); I must have gotten it in 1959 or so.

The first camera that I bought for myself was a Canon EF 35mm with an 50mm f/1.4 lens. I also got my father's Vivitar 75-205mm zoom and 200mm prime. After misplacing it for many years, I found it a few years ago and now still use it from time to time.

My first digital camera was a big and clunky HP Photosmart (I worked for HP at the time) sometime around 2002.

Link | Posted on Mar 16, 2017 at 12:47 UTC as 272nd comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

ChrisH37: A shame that wifi transfer from manufacturer apps is not supported (i.e. Nikon WMU, Canon Camera Connect) as they are often the quickest way of transferring out in the field.

Possibly a limitation of the apps themselves?

My Canon 80D will only transfer a jpg created from a Raw file to CameraConnect and my G5X won't transfer anything unless a jpg is present (i.e. jpeg-only or RAW+jpeg). I don't know if this is a limitation in the cameras or in the app itself. (More likely it's both.)

Link | Posted on Sep 2, 2016 at 13:18 UTC
Total: 7, showing: 1 – 7