tex

Lives in United States baltimore, MD, United States
Works as a Artist, visual arts professional
Has a website at www.texandrewsart.com
Joined on Nov 22, 2003
About me:

Working artist [photography only one aspect], MFA. Began photography 1978 (1967 as a kid), 35mm, MF and LF photography, darkroom. Independent curator, art wrangler, fine arts repro photographer, appraiser; former collegiate gallery director, former program director for an alternative space, 10 yrs undergraduate teaching, 2 yrs chair of the department; Exhibits specialist at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Former supermoderator of the late Lightcrafts' LightZone forums. Co-founder and webmaster of The LightZone Project, www.lightzoneproject.org

Comments

Total: 116, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »
In reply to:

tex: Well, here's what I would say to both the doubters and the believers. First, take a look at HCB's contact sheets. The final images are ones he selected from many possibilities; thus it would be entirely possible for him to "impose" compositional structure post shutter press through the winnowing process. Second, as pointed out below(and by the master himself), some of this winds up being intuitive/learned through practice and process. To think otherwise is foolish. Next, humans' eyes have a particular FOV, we move through a world that presents us from birth certain organizational patterns both in nature and culture, why would it be controversial that composition would not be random, even with street shooting? I think it probable that there is a biological component to composition. Next, while the author does indeed proffer something to the market, this does not make him a charlatan by that alone. Continued

I would add to all of this that HCB was a cultured man: it is highly unlikely he was not aware of the extraordinary lengths painters went to to compose their objects up until Impressionism (well...some of it ;-} ) and the fashion of off-handed and "spontaneous" compositions that became fashionable for certain styles from then until now. Please delve into pre 19th century painting a little deeper to see. Can one add enough grid lines to make any composition make "sense"? Of course. But a bit of judiciousness is all that is required not to throw the baby out with the bath water. Photographers are so very overwhelmed by "the moment". It's no wonder an attempt to show an iconic "moment" photographer's quite likely interest in the niceties of composition, which would on the surface seem to undermine the magick of the "moment", would draw fire....

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2017 at 18:05 UTC

Well, here's what I would say to both the doubters and the believers. First, take a look at HCB's contact sheets. The final images are ones he selected from many possibilities; thus it would be entirely possible for him to "impose" compositional structure post shutter press through the winnowing process. Second, as pointed out below(and by the master himself), some of this winds up being intuitive/learned through practice and process. To think otherwise is foolish. Next, humans' eyes have a particular FOV, we move through a world that presents us from birth certain organizational patterns both in nature and culture, why would it be controversial that composition would not be random, even with street shooting? I think it probable that there is a biological component to composition. Next, while the author does indeed proffer something to the market, this does not make him a charlatan by that alone. Continued

Link | Posted on Aug 19, 2017 at 17:54 UTC as 35th comment | 1 reply
In reply to:

Ruy Penalva: I always found Corel very non intuitive and hard to master. Complicated the old interfaces.

And Photoshop is intuitive? Oh, please!

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2017 at 16:31 UTC

Too bad that dolly's not carbon fiber. I have 2 Manfrotto dollies. Folded up, they're cumbersome and heavy. Please apply some industrial design to those things!

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2017 at 15:33 UTC as 7th comment
In reply to:

mrb375: Good News- Their stuff absolutely rocks.

Bad News- They are wacky, tree-hugging, latte-sipping, San-Fran Snowflakes.

Wow.

Link | Posted on Aug 10, 2017 at 15:21 UTC
In reply to:

Vanitas Photo: Could someone remind Bowens slavery isnt a thing on 1st world countries please? Also #Dontbuybowens

What?

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2017 at 20:19 UTC
In reply to:

Conrad567: The contract requires TWO PARTS. Their work is traded for pay. No PAY, NO CONTRACT. This is basic business law.

Exactly. Try taking the workers to court! First, you'd be ordered to pay them back wages....

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2017 at 20:18 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Adobe Lightroom 1.0 (124 comments in total)
In reply to:

tex: Well, a couple of history bits that got left out. Before Lightroom were several interesting programs, two of which got "absorbed" into LR IIRC when they were bought out by Adobe: RSE and RSP. RSE, Raw Shooter Essentials was an early raw processing program that was terrific for its time and free; RSP was the paid "pro" version that came soon after, and many of us bought it. Then, suddenly the news that the people behind RSE/P informed everyone they were selling to Adobe (and maybe going to work there, too). Those of us who had just bought RSP were shocked and saddened.
Then, a miracle happened: everyone who bought RSP got a free license to the new Lightroom. I suspect it was a condition of the sale, but still it was one of the most generous things Adobe has ever done. And that generosity continues with Lightroom, imo. It is today a great program and really fairly priced. I'll be using it in a few minutes.

Then, that other largely forgotten but not dead program, LightZone (full disclosure: with several others including forums member Doug Pardee---a heavy lifter---and a cast of volunteers and dedicated users---I help run a website that keeps that program alive, and gives it away for free. It's also open source, now).
LightZone, invented by Fabio Riccardi and several other dedicated coders, was the first raw editing program that offered full 16bit, non destructive, and selective editing throughout the editing process. It is based on an interpretation of the Zone system in part. It remains an intersting program for certain uses. The parent company went dark in 2011 when Fabio moved to Apple, and a year later he let us take it open source with the help of Anton Kast, one of the original developers. It was also totally cross platform from the start, Mac, Win, and Linux.
So, there is some lateral background to the story.

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2017 at 13:31 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Adobe Lightroom 1.0 (124 comments in total)

Well, a couple of history bits that got left out. Before Lightroom were several interesting programs, two of which got "absorbed" into LR IIRC when they were bought out by Adobe: RSE and RSP. RSE, Raw Shooter Essentials was an early raw processing program that was terrific for its time and free; RSP was the paid "pro" version that came soon after, and many of us bought it. Then, suddenly the news that the people behind RSE/P informed everyone they were selling to Adobe (and maybe going to work there, too). Those of us who had just bought RSP were shocked and saddened.
Then, a miracle happened: everyone who bought RSP got a free license to the new Lightroom. I suspect it was a condition of the sale, but still it was one of the most generous things Adobe has ever done. And that generosity continues with Lightroom, imo. It is today a great program and really fairly priced. I'll be using it in a few minutes.

Link | Posted on Aug 3, 2017 at 13:23 UTC as 43rd comment | 3 replies

Nikon, Canon, now this...let's not even talk about politics. Seems like you can't make this stuff up in the latter teens of the 21st century. Who needs fake news? Next I'll be reading about "Bat Boy".

Link | Posted on Jul 20, 2017 at 19:03 UTC as 66th comment

Cool idea, but....not actually "universal".

Link | Posted on Jul 13, 2017 at 16:37 UTC as 29th comment | 1 reply

Nice looking posters....but the whole thing seems sadly nostalgic in a way.

Link | Posted on Jul 11, 2017 at 22:35 UTC as 83rd comment | 1 reply

That USB power looks interesting. Wonder if Pentax could do something like that....although I'm not having battery life problems so far.

Link | Posted on Jul 11, 2017 at 15:13 UTC as 10th comment
On article Report: Ricoh announcing cost cuts in face of crisis (326 comments in total)
In reply to:

matthew saville: On a more serious note, I somehow doubt that Pentax' market is big enough for Ricoh to be able to afford to do anything more than just barely afford to keep the doors open. Compared to their other business, I bet that it's roughly equivalent to a doctor or lawyer who drives for Uber in his spare time.

Of course, I'd absolutely love to be wrong there. I think the K-1 was a huge step forward for Pentax, and hopefully they have another full-frame camera on the horizon, maybe even a mirrorless one. If they could come up with one, even if they do the same silly thing of sticking with their existing mount / flange distance, that'd be huge for them.

To Davinator, and others:
Some of what you say is correct, if not all, but I'd like to add that Pentax is now the only camera company that encompasses all formats from sub APSC through medium format, and also now includes the quite interesting (and far better than Nikon's...) 360 VR camera, the Theta.

It's again a shame that Pentax finds itself attached to a problem, first Hoya and now this. They have themselves to blame to a certain extent, going back several decades, but still. And niche or not, the best of the Pentax products are great.

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2017 at 20:52 UTC
On article Analog gems: 10 excellent, affordable film cameras (808 comments in total)

Well, with today's quality of digital, even in smaller formats, I personally don't see much point in shooting 35mm film.

OTOH, there's arguably still a point to medium format film, and the range of what medium format analog is---basically anything that takes 120 or the now scarce 220 film---means that there are tons of great deals out there.

I'll put in a vote for the Pentax 645 series. The biggest deficit was that it didn't have interchangeable backs. The advantage is that with the 645N and NII cameras you had a reasonably modern camera and lenses----and now you can use those lenses with the new Pentax digital medium format cameras.

I'd also put in a word for the Fuji fixed lens cameras, 645 through 6x9. as compact as you can get for the film formats.

Link | Posted on May 20, 2017 at 14:15 UTC as 353rd comment
On article Analog gems: 10 excellent, affordable film cameras (808 comments in total)
In reply to:

Toselli: My suggestion would be a rollei 35, the only thing is that you have to live with the quirkiness of zinc/air cells: if you let them on the camera they work really well at the beginning, but they lower the voltage after a couple of months when they start to wear out all the oxygen that was inside the battery chamber. The solution is taking it out for a couple of hours to restore its original voltage, and putting back in before starting to shoot again, but unluckily in this way it's impossible to do it if you have an unfinished roll inside (the battery chamber is under the roll, inside the roll housing...). Anyway that camera is a beast, really sharp even at f/2.8 (if you get the focus right, no aid, focus scale only), and best of all fully manual aperture and shutter speed like an SLR!

Yes, any of the Rollei 35 series cameras...IF you want to bother with 35mm film...

Link | Posted on May 20, 2017 at 14:06 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Olympus C-8080 Wide Zoom (101 comments in total)

I had one in 2005, right after my C5050, and got it right before our first big family trip out of the U.S., to Turkey. I'll always have great memories of using this camera. Those images and subsequent ones I made later that year and into the next, before I moved to an E-330, and after that an E-3, my last Oly camera, were ones that jump-started my stalled out photographic image making, and helped me start to get proficient with post processing. Really a tremendous boon to my work---I'll always remember it fondly. Nice to see some old forum friends commenting.

Link | Posted on May 18, 2017 at 16:30 UTC as 49th comment
On article GoPro documents skier's fall into crevasse (5 comments in total)
In reply to:

tex: Darwin award runner up. Runner up because he lived. Hope he at least got billed for the rescue, seeing as how those guys had to risk their lives for his thrills.

I think what this guy did, and others like him, is the height of irresponsibility. This is not a case of falling into something he didn't know was there---he was remarking on it at the top of the run! And the rescue workers have to get right up to the mouth of the crevasse to get him out. And yes, rescue workers have died doing these sorts of things. What did he do to me? Well, my sister's on call for rescue work in Jackson Hole, as she's an instructor at the mountain....
BTW, I've skied at over 2 dozen ski areas in the U.S. (east and west) and Canada on and off piste, alpine , tele, and X-C. So, I've been in some spectacular locations. I'm not irresponsible, though, and have more respect for the rescue teams.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2017 at 21:33 UTC
On article GoPro documents skier's fall into crevasse (5 comments in total)

Darwin award runner up. Runner up because he lived. Hope he at least got billed for the rescue, seeing as how those guys had to risk their lives for his thrills.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2017 at 19:05 UTC as 1st comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Jefbak: I'm troubled by these projects. When I realized it just wasn't possible to film something like this organically, I felt a little tricked. You can't naturally film a time lapse in nature this way so compositing effects to give the illusion that this was seamless, while very skillful, seems to break a rule when it comes to capturing nature as it actually occurs. I guess I don't like see special effects applied to what is basically landscape photography.

Having just done a time-lapse project for Smithsonian Gardens and the Hirshhorn as the assistant to the Hirshhorn's principal professional photographer and our AV department, I knew immediately that this was composited. I am not bothered by that, it's so obvious here; and I don't think it's trying to present itself as a reality documentation, but rather an artistic one. Therefore pretty much anything is possible and "allowable". That others with less understanding may mistake this as "organic" doesn't trouble me either---that always happens with people who don't understand processes.

Link | Posted on May 9, 2017 at 13:11 UTC
Total: 116, showing: 1 – 20
« First‹ Previous12345Next ›Last »