tex

Lives in United States baltimore, MD, United States
Works as a Artist, visual arts professional
Joined on Nov 22, 2003
About me:

Working artist [photography only one aspect], MFA. Began photography 1978 (1967 as a kid), 35mm, MF and LF photography, darkroom. Independent curator, art wrangler, fine arts repro photographer, appraiser; former collegiate gallery director, former program director for an alternative space, 10 yrs undergraduate teaching, 2 yrs chair of the department; Exhibits specialist at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Former supermoderator of the late Lightcrafts' LightZone forums. Co-founder and webmaster of The LightZone Project, www.lightzoneproject.org

Comments

Total: 162, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Sony 'striping': here's the fix (748 comments in total)
In reply to:

tex: What interests me most about this is not the problem or the fix---I've come to expect problems from one thing or another in my entire life, and appreciate fixes whenever they come about. Like other problems, this one seems to occur under certain circumstances? But when it does it does look a bit serious. Artifacts are of concern to those of us who have exacting standards, or who must work to imposed exacting standards.

What interests me more are the reactions, both from DPR staff and among posters here so far, which seem to me to be demonstrating implicit/unintentional bias in every direction, both in favor of Sony and against it. It is interesting to me because it puts the lie to the concept of complete and total objectivity and neutrality. I don't expect such from readers. But at this point in DPR's development, I do rather want to see more neutrality from DPR. It's (past) time for some independent editorial review mechanism.

@Eric Hensel. Not an interesting concept, but an impossibility. Knowing that is all the more reason to develop a mechanism to backstop the editorial process with independent review.

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2018 at 16:24 UTC
On article Sony 'striping': here's the fix (748 comments in total)

What interests me most about this is not the problem or the fix---I've come to expect problems from one thing or another in my entire life, and appreciate fixes whenever they come about. Like other problems, this one seems to occur under certain circumstances? But when it does it does look a bit serious. Artifacts are of concern to those of us who have exacting standards, or who must work to imposed exacting standards.

What interests me more are the reactions, both from DPR staff and among posters here so far, which seem to me to be demonstrating implicit/unintentional bias in every direction, both in favor of Sony and against it. It is interesting to me because it puts the lie to the concept of complete and total objectivity and neutrality. I don't expect such from readers. But at this point in DPR's development, I do rather want to see more neutrality from DPR. It's (past) time for some independent editorial review mechanism.

Link | Posted on Apr 18, 2018 at 16:00 UTC as 137th comment | 10 replies

"When comparing the output of these two modes in our widget above, it's clear traditional Pixel Shift results in better detail capture than its hand-held counterpart – this is visible throughout our scene. "

Hmmm...I haven't looked at every spot, but they look pretty comparable to me....

Link | Posted on Apr 9, 2018 at 16:46 UTC as 40th comment
In reply to:

tex: Well, one thing I think is missing from this article and mostly the comments as well is something that many of us know from personal observations: the entire camera market's main target audience is rapidly aging. That means a several things. One is a certain entrenched mindset among the main buyers, which may support DSLR's for a while. Another is that an older market may be less interested in continual upgrades. Together these may (may!) combine to suppress sales a tad, and any "switching" between systems. Then throw in the general excellence of so many cameras today which just increases the impetus to "stand pat". I've been buying cameras at a near breakneck speed since 2001, but now that I have a pair of top end cameras (for what I do) that's slowing way, way down. I could easily use these cameras for years and years and not upgrade or switch.

So, there's some demographics to consider, and maybe a need to better understand how and why younger generations use imaging generally.

@T3. Well, since I previously had both an A7R and an NEX7 I certainly understand that the size can be kept low. It's just that it also tends to creep up, sometimes annoyingly so. Typically they will always be smaller than the dslr counterparts, but I think I said that they don't save "a tremendous" amount of size and weight. FYI, I'm a huge fan of Sony, and have been since I got my A850 in 2010. When most everyone else was saying they weren't a "real" camera company....

As for the Fuji, indeed, it approximates some dslr's in size, but it is chunky in hand, and the lenses tend slightly larger. Remarkable, though. It will truly be killer when they sort the EVF---poor imo compared to Sony evf's. I liked my A7R's evf.

Link | Posted on Apr 8, 2018 at 23:04 UTC
In reply to:

tex: Well, one thing I think is missing from this article and mostly the comments as well is something that many of us know from personal observations: the entire camera market's main target audience is rapidly aging. That means a several things. One is a certain entrenched mindset among the main buyers, which may support DSLR's for a while. Another is that an older market may be less interested in continual upgrades. Together these may (may!) combine to suppress sales a tad, and any "switching" between systems. Then throw in the general excellence of so many cameras today which just increases the impetus to "stand pat". I've been buying cameras at a near breakneck speed since 2001, but now that I have a pair of top end cameras (for what I do) that's slowing way, way down. I could easily use these cameras for years and years and not upgrade or switch.

So, there's some demographics to consider, and maybe a need to better understand how and why younger generations use imaging generally.

(continued)
As far as the reduction in size goes, there's mirrorless ILC's (Sony aspc's, the smaller Fuji's, etc) and mirrorless ILC's (Sony FF, Fuji MF, etc). These latter don't save a tremendous amount of size and weight (when coupled with the best lenses...) as opposed to the former, which you, T3, cited. Certainly there's a market for downsizing....but let's not forget that it's downsizing in every way, which isn't necessarily a happy thing for makers.

I think the question gets more complex the harder you look at it.

Link | Posted on Apr 8, 2018 at 18:08 UTC
In reply to:

tex: Well, one thing I think is missing from this article and mostly the comments as well is something that many of us know from personal observations: the entire camera market's main target audience is rapidly aging. That means a several things. One is a certain entrenched mindset among the main buyers, which may support DSLR's for a while. Another is that an older market may be less interested in continual upgrades. Together these may (may!) combine to suppress sales a tad, and any "switching" between systems. Then throw in the general excellence of so many cameras today which just increases the impetus to "stand pat". I've been buying cameras at a near breakneck speed since 2001, but now that I have a pair of top end cameras (for what I do) that's slowing way, way down. I could easily use these cameras for years and years and not upgrade or switch.

So, there's some demographics to consider, and maybe a need to better understand how and why younger generations use imaging generally.

@T3 & peripheralfocus:

1st, I don't know, either---anecdotal observations always are suspect at least when applied "globally" as well as globally. Nevertheless, it's hard to miss when cruising around a big show like PhotoPlus in NYC. Can't speak to Europe, except what I see here and at the other forums/sites I visit that include Europeans...and Latin Americans. The Japanese I saw in Japan and in photos seem to skew older---and I don't mean disposable income older, I mean nearing or in retirement older, which is what I'm observing here in the U.S. and on these forums and the others. But we are lacking hard data I think. If someone has it, it would be very interesting to see, I think.

I believe that outside of Japan, Taiwan, Korea (maybe), and Singapore, we are still speaking of developing economies, so that's a different animal. China is itself a different animal for that reason and due to its size. It's correct that all of those markets are different than the western ones.

Link | Posted on Apr 8, 2018 at 18:08 UTC

Well, one thing I think is missing from this article and mostly the comments as well is something that many of us know from personal observations: the entire camera market's main target audience is rapidly aging. That means a several things. One is a certain entrenched mindset among the main buyers, which may support DSLR's for a while. Another is that an older market may be less interested in continual upgrades. Together these may (may!) combine to suppress sales a tad, and any "switching" between systems. Then throw in the general excellence of so many cameras today which just increases the impetus to "stand pat". I've been buying cameras at a near breakneck speed since 2001, but now that I have a pair of top end cameras (for what I do) that's slowing way, way down. I could easily use these cameras for years and years and not upgrade or switch.

So, there's some demographics to consider, and maybe a need to better understand how and why younger generations use imaging generally.

Link | Posted on Apr 8, 2018 at 15:13 UTC as 275th comment | 6 replies

And this is certainly one way to distinguish yourself from the pack.

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2018 at 22:06 UTC as 178th comment
In reply to:

tex: Back to the future: I had a Jobo in 2005

@DarnGoodPhotos & entoman: One would have thought that the "flying car" bit would have tipped anyone off.....

Link | Posted on Apr 4, 2018 at 13:05 UTC
In reply to:

tex: Back to the future: I had a Jobo in 2005

Sar-chasm. You can look it up.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2018 at 22:36 UTC
In reply to:

tex: Back to the future: I had a Jobo in 2005

@sibuzaru: Oh, yeah, my Jobo had all that in 2005. And I had a flying car, too.

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2018 at 16:44 UTC

Back to the future: I had a Jobo in 2005

Link | Posted on Apr 3, 2018 at 16:27 UTC as 28th comment | 11 replies

Canon has played this one "not to lose". With those 130 million EF lenses, and so many people so "invested" in Canon generally ( in gear and in their heads...), it may be that they will wind up having been smart to wait. Now, It's obvious that mirrorless is not only here to stay, but that the competition from Sony, and to a lesser degree Fuji, has become real. So, best bring something to market. It won't have to be the best, just competent, like the current lineup of bodies.

Link | Posted on Mar 23, 2018 at 19:59 UTC as 181st comment | 1 reply

Although I have been the beneficiary of NEA grants (indirectly) as have institutions I have worked for and with, and have served on an NEA funding panel for public sculpture, I am here reminded of the caution, "lies, damned lies, and statistics".

While I believe the economic impact of the arts indeed to be great, I think this is probably a crude and self-serving (considering looming the extinction of this agency in the U.S., ...) "metric". I'd say finding the real economic impact might be very difficult to do.

Link | Posted on Mar 21, 2018 at 19:54 UTC as 18th comment | 1 reply
On article Sigma interview: 'This is just the beginning' (339 comments in total)

Both Kenji Tanaka of Sony and now here Yamaki-san show a key difference between their companies and the others. Both Sony and Sigma are forging ahead as innovators, and the relative candor of these executives contrasts sharply with the more reticent and conservative responses from the other executives, which highlights the overall differences in approach of the various companies.

Link | Posted on Mar 19, 2018 at 14:13 UTC as 127th comment

Well, we'll see, won't we. Possibly the worst news for Nikon, less than the other players. But it's notable that Canon has waited this long---long enough for the 3rd party lens field to be populated, and long enough to watch their own lenses now (not so much previously---see recent reviews)being used on Sony cameras w/o too much of a penalty.

Link | Posted on Mar 13, 2018 at 17:48 UTC as 114th comment | 2 replies
On article Canon got it right on International Women's Day (463 comments in total)
In reply to:

tex: More! From more companies. More equal pay, let's start there. More acknowledgement of the contributions of women in all fields. And etc.

I say this as the son of a single mom, a brother to 2 sisters, a stepson of a fabulous stepmother, a student of some wonderful female teachers and professors, a colleague to a bunch of great and capable women, a spouse of a wonderful woman, and the father of 2 amazing daughters.

Spit on that, DPR creeps.

USA, and you are very incorrect.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2018 at 23:43 UTC
On article Canon got it right on International Women's Day (463 comments in total)

More! From more companies. More equal pay, let's start there. More acknowledgement of the contributions of women in all fields. And etc.

I say this as the son of a single mom, a brother to 2 sisters, a stepson of a fabulous stepmother, a student of some wonderful female teachers and professors, a colleague to a bunch of great and capable women, a spouse of a wonderful woman, and the father of 2 amazing daughters.

Spit on that, DPR creeps.

Link | Posted on Mar 8, 2018 at 23:13 UTC as 96th comment | 17 replies
On article Cactus announces palm-sized RQ250 wireless monolight (84 comments in total)
In reply to:

arcterex: As the one pentax user in the world this is super exciting to me. As long as the price is reasonable this looks like a great addition to my lighting setup.

@Cactus Image:
Hey, good to see that someone from the company keeps tabs on us. That kind of thing inspires confidence. I already have Cactus flashes for my Pentax cameras, but this encourages me to stick with you.

Link | Posted on Mar 6, 2018 at 14:09 UTC
On article CP+ 2018: Hands-on with Laowa 'Magic Shift Converter' (119 comments in total)

What do I think? Sounds great, if it works.

Link | Posted on Mar 3, 2018 at 13:22 UTC as 19th comment
Total: 162, showing: 1 – 20
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