tex

Lives in United States baltimore, MD, United States
Works as a Artist, visual arts professional
Has a website at www.texandrewsart.com
Joined on Nov 22, 2003
About me:

Working artist [photography only one aspect], MFA. Began photography 1978 (1967 as a kid), 35mm, MF and LF photography, darkroom. Independent curator, art wrangler, fine arts repro photographer, appraiser; former collegiate gallery director, former program director for an alternative space, 10 yrs undergraduate teaching, 2 yrs chair of the department; Exhibits specialist at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Former supermoderator of the late Lightcrafts' LightZone forums. Co-founder and webmaster of The LightZone Project, www.lightzoneproject.org

Comments

Total: 103, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Report: Ricoh announcing cost cuts in face of crisis (280 comments in total)
In reply to:

matthew saville: On a more serious note, I somehow doubt that Pentax' market is big enough for Ricoh to be able to afford to do anything more than just barely afford to keep the doors open. Compared to their other business, I bet that it's roughly equivalent to a doctor or lawyer who drives for Uber in his spare time.

Of course, I'd absolutely love to be wrong there. I think the K-1 was a huge step forward for Pentax, and hopefully they have another full-frame camera on the horizon, maybe even a mirrorless one. If they could come up with one, even if they do the same silly thing of sticking with their existing mount / flange distance, that'd be huge for them.

To Davinator, and others:
Some of what you say is correct, if not all, but I'd like to add that Pentax is now the only camera company that encompasses all formats from sub APSC through medium format, and also now includes the quite interesting (and far better than Nikon's...) 360 VR camera, the Theta.

It's again a shame that Pentax finds itself attached to a problem, first Hoya and now this. They have themselves to blame to a certain extent, going back several decades, but still. And niche or not, the best of the Pentax products are great.

Link | Posted on Jun 19, 2017 at 20:52 UTC
On article Analog gems: 10 excellent, affordable film cameras (805 comments in total)

Well, with today's quality of digital, even in smaller formats, I personally don't see much point in shooting 35mm film.

OTOH, there's arguably still a point to medium format film, and the range of what medium format analog is---basically anything that takes 120 or the now scarce 220 film---means that there are tons of great deals out there.

I'll put in a vote for the Pentax 645 series. The biggest deficit was that it didn't have interchangeable backs. The advantage is that with the 645N and NII cameras you had a reasonably modern camera and lenses----and now you can use those lenses with the new Pentax digital medium format cameras.

I'd also put in a word for the Fuji fixed lens cameras, 645 through 6x9. as compact as you can get for the film formats.

Link | Posted on May 20, 2017 at 14:15 UTC as 338th comment
On article Analog gems: 10 excellent, affordable film cameras (805 comments in total)
In reply to:

Toselli: My suggestion would be a rollei 35, the only thing is that you have to live with the quirkiness of zinc/air cells: if you let them on the camera they work really well at the beginning, but they lower the voltage after a couple of months when they start to wear out all the oxygen that was inside the battery chamber. The solution is taking it out for a couple of hours to restore its original voltage, and putting back in before starting to shoot again, but unluckily in this way it's impossible to do it if you have an unfinished roll inside (the battery chamber is under the roll, inside the roll housing...). Anyway that camera is a beast, really sharp even at f/2.8 (if you get the focus right, no aid, focus scale only), and best of all fully manual aperture and shutter speed like an SLR!

Yes, any of the Rollei 35 series cameras...IF you want to bother with 35mm film...

Link | Posted on May 20, 2017 at 14:06 UTC
On article Throwback Thursday: Olympus C-8080 Wide Zoom (100 comments in total)

I had one in 2005, right after my C5050, and got it right before our first big family trip out of the U.S., to Turkey. I'll always have great memories of using this camera. Those images and subsequent ones I made later that year and into the next, before I moved to an E-330, and after that an E-3, my last Oly camera, were ones that jump-started my stalled out photographic image making, and helped me start to get proficient with post processing. Really a tremendous boon to my work---I'll always remember it fondly. Nice to see some old forum friends commenting.

Link | Posted on May 18, 2017 at 16:30 UTC as 48th comment
On article GoPro documents skier's fall into crevasse (5 comments in total)
In reply to:

tex: Darwin award runner up. Runner up because he lived. Hope he at least got billed for the rescue, seeing as how those guys had to risk their lives for his thrills.

I think what this guy did, and others like him, is the height of irresponsibility. This is not a case of falling into something he didn't know was there---he was remarking on it at the top of the run! And the rescue workers have to get right up to the mouth of the crevasse to get him out. And yes, rescue workers have died doing these sorts of things. What did he do to me? Well, my sister's on call for rescue work in Jackson Hole, as she's an instructor at the mountain....
BTW, I've skied at over 2 dozen ski areas in the U.S. (east and west) and Canada on and off piste, alpine , tele, and X-C. So, I've been in some spectacular locations. I'm not irresponsible, though, and have more respect for the rescue teams.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2017 at 21:33 UTC
On article GoPro documents skier's fall into crevasse (5 comments in total)

Darwin award runner up. Runner up because he lived. Hope he at least got billed for the rescue, seeing as how those guys had to risk their lives for his thrills.

Link | Posted on May 10, 2017 at 19:05 UTC as 1st comment | 4 replies
In reply to:

Jefbak: I'm troubled by these projects. When I realized it just wasn't possible to film something like this organically, I felt a little tricked. You can't naturally film a time lapse in nature this way so compositing effects to give the illusion that this was seamless, while very skillful, seems to break a rule when it comes to capturing nature as it actually occurs. I guess I don't like see special effects applied to what is basically landscape photography.

Having just done a time-lapse project for Smithsonian Gardens and the Hirshhorn as the assistant to the Hirshhorn's principal professional photographer and our AV department, I knew immediately that this was composited. I am not bothered by that, it's so obvious here; and I don't think it's trying to present itself as a reality documentation, but rather an artistic one. Therefore pretty much anything is possible and "allowable". That others with less understanding may mistake this as "organic" doesn't trouble me either---that always happens with people who don't understand processes.

Link | Posted on May 9, 2017 at 13:11 UTC
In reply to:

Oli4D: Phone cameras soon will be able to zoom properly. As soon as that happens, the classic camera manufactures will have huge losses again. For sure.

The one thing phones can't overcome is their lousy haptics as cameras. You have to add stuff to them to fix that, like a grip. That isn't going away. And if you fix that, you take away a lot of what makes the phone camera so convenient, its slim size ( which is the one thing they have left going for them size-wise, since most smart phones are now larger in order to accommodate the needed screen size...)

It's like any other tool. The best one for a job is usually the purpose built one.

Link | Posted on May 3, 2017 at 09:22 UTC
In reply to:

pookipichu: Zhong Yi, anyone, please come out with new lenses for the Pentax 645Z, please.

@Teila Day Mostly agree, although maybe IBIS is a big challenge above FF? But I do think the Fuji situation is developing in such a way (now the pro support, and those 3rd party fast lenses, although I think they're a bit of a gimmick...) that Pentax needs to do a thing or two. Why not refresh that 45? It's the only "dud" of the old lenses (and not that big a dud...) Basically all the older lenses could be given a coatings refresh---Pentax ought to offer a refurb path for our lenses, that would be cool to get new coatings. I think they could redo some lenses as WR also, and they need that T/S lens, which they could do with maybe the 45 from the 6x7 line...And then they really need a wide prime to take the place of the discontinued 25. Oh, and support....

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 20:33 UTC
In reply to:

obsolescence: Both K-1 and 645Z need a range of T-S lenses to make them really useful architectural and studio photography cams.

@obsolescence. That's because they are weird people ;-} Not as enlightened as museum folk. We would never accept the distortions that come with forcing verticals beyond the reasonable. Of course most of our work is of smaller stuff, not some 40 plus story building. Then there's Gehry---how would one know it's distorted? (again, smirking...). In all seriousness, though, a lot of time in interiors you can get those straight lines if you've got a good lens to begin with plus PP. I feel like T/S or shift lenses are more outdoor things, unless it's a very big interior space, like a train station...But I'll assume you know best as an architectural photographer . It really is a pity Pentax hasn't done something here...they have the 6x7 designs! Enough circle there I would think to make a 645 T/S....

Link | Posted on Apr 26, 2017 at 20:22 UTC
In reply to:

pookipichu: Zhong Yi, anyone, please come out with new lenses for the Pentax 645Z, please.

Oops, yes, brain infarction. Long day is all I can say, on my 15th hour with 3 to go...

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2017 at 23:21 UTC
In reply to:

pookipichu: Zhong Yi, anyone, please come out with new lenses for the Pentax 645Z, please.

Yes, since the flange back distance is greater in the Z, these might be able to adapt just as Samyang's have for E-mount. Might....

Link | Posted on Apr 25, 2017 at 22:20 UTC
In reply to:

attomole: Almost completely pointless

Continued...

As to what consumers want? Don't ask me! I think social media is stupid, so what do I know? I bet it will come down to price. I can certainly see this sort of thing being sold alongside wedding videos, for instance, for other events, music videos, in the construction trades, forensics, military applications, surveillance, and a host of other things.

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2017 at 20:07 UTC
In reply to:

attomole: Almost completely pointless

Indeed, as you say, in many instances one wants to see around an object that is centrally located, but in those cases standard VR techniques can be applied, or the accessibility issue is less of a problem---the wheelchair bound may have more or less as good a view of something as anyone else.

It's in limited access room situations that we run into a problem, or in historic homes or even archaeological sites where making something truly accessible is either prohibitively expensive, or compromises the site, or is just plain impossible. In these cases we are indeed more in a situation of central viewer looking out and around themselves. The addition of , in this case, the K1's excellent still files to enhance the detail at key points really makes this kind of wonderful. The project we did was great, but a little lo-res overall, I guess 1080. Decent, but you could see the dots. How I wish we'd been able to use this system if it had been ready. Would've been killer.

Link | Posted on Apr 23, 2017 at 20:03 UTC
In reply to:

attomole: Almost completely pointless

well, for most it probably is. But at my museum we have a real use for this. In our latest exhibition we had to provide some kind of user experience to meet ADA requirements---we had several installations that could not be made accessible for the wheelchair bound. We went with VR, and partnered with Samsung on the phones and goggles. It was pretty good! And now the rest of the Smithsonian system is looking into it. I predict every museum, historic home, & etc will be getting on board with this tech within only several years. It's far, far cheaper than any other alternatives (construction...). Add in the ability to include hi-res captures from the K1 (see link in my post below) , and you've really got something. Like I said below, I sort of had your attitude (not as harsh...) until I saw it in action, then saw how it could be used to solve a real problem.

Link | Posted on Apr 22, 2017 at 11:49 UTC

I never thought I'd be interested in this sort of thing, but after seeing one demo'd last fall at PhotoExpo, I actually am intrigued. Then I saw this: https://pentaxrumors.com/2017/02/26/ricohs-multi-imaging-technology-connects-a-pentax-k-1-with-a-theta-s/

Then I got REAL interested. Biggest issues for me: current models had limited storage, it wasn't swappable, and no connector/adapter for mains power.

Fix those things in the new one (another version can already do this, but at 2K), and I'm in. BTW, I met a professional photographer at my museum shooting something I had worked on, and he was on his 3rd Theta. He loves it.

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 17:03 UTC as 11th comment | 2 replies
In reply to:

DPPMetro: What's funny is that everyone was claiming (with no evidence) on the Pentax forums that the next update for the K-1 would fix lots of problems and enhance features and then they release this puny update that doesn't do anything. Almost seems like it was released to give some signs of life in the company after the credible Nikkei report about the questionable future of Ricoh in photo imaging.

I'm getting a clearer picture now of why the mods elsewhere are deleting your posts....

Link | Posted on Apr 21, 2017 at 14:56 UTC
In reply to:

AndreStMaur: I still have an A850 and use it regularly. It is quite competent compared with present cameras, if you don't need faster frame rate than 4 pictures/s and can live with an AF system that is accurate but not blazingly fast. The viewfinder is a joy to use, the noise level is not as high as people believe in raw mode, dynamic range is quite good, etc... It is actually interesting to see that "reviews" exaggerate the difference between cameras and that the progresses have been much smaller in practice than one would believe. Unless you really want to photograph the milky way or need extreme dynamic range, the prints will be just as good as the ones from the latest and greatest.

Yes, in that time period I didn't find the noise a problem at all. Had a decent grain-like look. And remember, I am pretty sure those were the days when both Nikon and Canon were serving up raws that weren't really raw, as reported here and elsewhere---and part od that was applied NR you couldn't turn off.

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2017 at 16:53 UTC

This helps to be sure. I do rather feel that the Image Transmitter software should have come with the Z, or else ought to be discounted for Z owners. I wouldn't balk at the $199 price tag if it was fabulous software, but it isn't.

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2017 at 16:48 UTC as 4th comment
In reply to:

obsolescence: Both K-1 and 645Z need a range of T-S lenses to make them really useful architectural and studio photography cams.

That would be best, but there is Hartblei. I have a 45 shift from them. Also, though, while not optimal to be sure, today's PP corrections work pretty well for many things, especially if you are not trying to fully correct (which I think looks very odd...)

Link | Posted on Apr 20, 2017 at 16:45 UTC
Total: 103, showing: 1 – 20
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