Picturenaut

Picturenaut

Lives in Frankfurt am Main
Works as a science journalist
Has a website at www.roland-wengenmayr.de
Joined on Jun 1, 2010
About me:

Love to shoot wildlife, birds, animals, macros of insects and spiders, plus street and portrait of people (I like to draw portraits too).

Comments

Total: 190, showing: 1 – 20
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On article Our favorite gear, rewarded: DPReview Awards 2017 (526 comments in total)
In reply to:

Uncle Ruddy: Having met their built-to life expectancy, none of these cameras will be operational in another 5 to 10 years. On the other hand, my Leica M10 will still be going strong.

Hi sh10453, sounds like a good collection. Re analogue Canons, I have an AE-1 and, because my most lenses have EF mount, an EOS 3. The EOS 3 is the most advanced 35 mm film SLR I ever used, so I take it when I want reliability (used it extensively e.g. in Iceland past year) - but I don't like the noise of its winder motor and the plastic look of this camera.

In fact, I am a Nikon user converted to Canon when I went digital many years ago, my wife and I have e.g. three Nikon FM-2 bodys - great SLRs. When my wife was in winter in Siberia some years ago she only took an FM-2 with her because she knew that this camera works always.

One of my fav cameras at the moment is a New Mamiya 6 mid format rangefinder set with three nice lenses.

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2018 at 21:15 UTC
On article Sony a7R Mark III review (1226 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dougbm_2: But still the main difference between mirrored and mirrorless is the optical verses electronic viewfinder. As much as the EVF is useful for judging exposure when it comes to critical shooting and clearly seeing the scene the optical viewfinder wins.

@ tbcass and Eric Hensel: it's a matter of personal taste, of course, and I enjoy using digital cameras, I'm no purist. But I was really getting tired of returning with thousands of images after some hours and flicking through them. For me personally, working with the restrictions of a vintage film camera was like a liberation, including street photography. But I do also Chinese ink portrait drawings of people and love the freedom that such a rigorous material (no chance to correct anything) can give me. In fact, I learned from many full-time artist friends that limits are essential for real imagination. But that's my personal approach.

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2018 at 09:54 UTC
On article Our favorite gear, rewarded: DPReview Awards 2017 (526 comments in total)
In reply to:

Uncle Ruddy: Having met their built-to life expectancy, none of these cameras will be operational in another 5 to 10 years. On the other hand, my Leica M10 will still be going strong.

@sh10453: I recommend you to use your Kiev 4 or at least keep it in daylight. Those old Selenium photocells (I guess the Kiev's is Selenium or CdS) die if they are kept too long in the dark. I have a 1954 Kodak Retina IIIc with a still quite precisely working photocell.

In fact, I do not want be fanboyish about Canon (don't care about brands), but we have both an extended Canon and Nikon SLR gear, including superteles. All parts made by Nikon in the digital age proofed to be much less reliable than the Canon stuff. Or D300 needed with only about 80.000 shutter actuations a complete new mirror box, our EOS 7D still working (now sold to a friend), our D300S and D700 are much more sensitive to water intrusion in hard rain than our Canon 7D, 7D2, 5D3. Plus, our small Nikkor 4/300 mm tele needed a new AF motor after only 6 years, our Canon EF 4/300 mm is still working nicely. Only our classic analogue Nikons are doing well after decades. Only bad luck with our Nikon gear? Don't think so.

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2018 at 09:38 UTC

Wonderful report, thanks for posting! Maybe I should start reading DPR more frequently again. I plunged too much into the beautiful world of chemical film photography I grew up with (side by side with digital cameras, I am no purist). Hasselblad was the uber camera mid format maker of that era, followed by Rolleiflex and Mamiya, both (nearly) faded away. In particular I like image 21 showing the senior lady: her fingers seem to tell a story about decades of Hasselblad's craftsmanship philosophy.

Link | Posted on Jan 3, 2018 at 09:19 UTC as 13th comment
On article Our favorite gear, rewarded: DPReview Awards 2017 (526 comments in total)
In reply to:

Endgame Trigger: Canon still beeing the market leader and profitable, is no proof for their superiority. It's just the proof, that the inertia of given glass appears (which is used by the company, blackmailing customers with immoral prices and inferior technology) and there is still such a thing, which I call the 'Apple-factor', a even stronger momentum of mass hypnosis, fanboyism, mental corruption and herd instinkt.

The 5D Mk II was the last strong Canon camera (after that the competition flew by with better sensors and therefor better IQ and Raw post production 'flesh'). Very soon even the competitions APS-C sensors had been able to shoot the mighty 5D III out of the trees by means of IQ, RAW-dynamic, resolution etc., but noone cared as noone seemed to care, that with the 5 Douche Mk IV even video was messed up.

Why is this? With the lively Nex-/ A6000 series the dominant Canon herd couldn't stop trowing dust at Sony, no lenses, no ergonomic. But the abusively debased M-series is the finest!

I am a still happy Canon "victim", my Canon gear proved to be always reliable shooting wildlife in rugged environments, salt water spray and sand storms, and never failed. But that's a quality never tested by sites such as DPR and photozines. Maybe this is the real grave Canon digs itself, because their prosumer products haven't a such short lifetime cycle than those made by most of their competitors. Sony seems to have much more the real obsolescence spirit, just check this blog post from Roger Cicala:
https://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2017/02/lens-teardown-of-the-complicated-sony-fe-70-200mm-f2-8-gm-oss-part-1/

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 10:30 UTC
On article Our favorite gear, rewarded: DPReview Awards 2017 (526 comments in total)
In reply to:

Daft Punk: I think the zero-black out of the Sony A9 is very special. A game changer. It has to be tried to be believed how liberating it is to shoot with zero VF blackout. Blew me away.

I think this achievement should be recognised.

Well, my Kodak Retina IIIc rangefinder from 1954 already had built-in zero blackout in its viewfinder. Leicas, Contaxes, Canons etc. from the 30s (and before) had that great feature. Sony in particular seems to prove the verdict that history sometimes repeats itself, but not as an exact copy. Sony re-invented also the SLT technology that Canon originally invented in the 1960s. (Caution: this post contains irony.)

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 10:07 UTC
On article Our favorite gear, rewarded: DPReview Awards 2017 (526 comments in total)
In reply to:

Uncle Ruddy: Having met their built-to life expectancy, none of these cameras will be operational in another 5 to 10 years. On the other hand, my Leica M10 will still be going strong.

A real Leica is analogue because you can keep it your whole life. In fact, one of my fav current cameras is a Canon 7 rangefinder from the early 60s, with some beautiful lenses. Digital and later analogue cameras are much more short life-cycle products because of aging of electronics and sensors.

Leica should offer a new M rangefinder line in which the electronic package and the sensor can be replaced but you can keep the camera body with all its scars and patina of a longterm use (what turns such an industry product into really your personal camera). That would be the true Leica spirit transformed into the digital age.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 09:52 UTC
On article Our favorite gear, rewarded: DPReview Awards 2017 (526 comments in total)
In reply to:

neverendinglight: Where's Canon? As a fully mirrorless guy (Olympus, Panasonic, and Sony), I REALLY wish Canon would get their heads out of the sand and start innovating again. A healthy AND competitive Canon makes all ILC better.

Unlike in their lens section, showing off with brillant products such as the compact and lightweight EF 400mm F4 Mk II diffraction optics lens, in the camera section they obviously lost their spirit to be on top. Maybe the collapse of the once big compact market hit them too much. Plus, DxO is their enemy, their North Korea shooting them constantly with bad sensor score missiles ;-) (caution: that's irony).

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 09:33 UTC
On article Sony a7R Mark III review (1226 comments in total)
In reply to:

Dougbm_2: But still the main difference between mirrored and mirrorless is the optical verses electronic viewfinder. As much as the EVF is useful for judging exposure when it comes to critical shooting and clearly seeing the scene the optical viewfinder wins.

OVF is good for longer battery life and people like me still shooting analogue cameras in parallel to digital cameras. Shooting film there is no other option than OVFs - be it rangefinders, SLRs, TLRs. Plus you need some training so you can imagine how the image will look like when the film is developed.

Cameras such as the A7R3 are fantastic, enormously capable tools, but I highly recommend to sometimes grab a beautiful vintage analogue camera, throw in a good film and shoot with OVF, manual setting and focusing, no complex menus to get lost in, no chimping, just concentrating on capturing the right moment. Keeps you grounded and sets your imagination free...

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 09:15 UTC
In reply to:

Melchiorum: Why no purple velvet version with leopard skin accents?

Some piercings would do well, too.

Link | Posted on Dec 20, 2017 at 08:55 UTC

Turns out the red in your eyes - and gets you into the red.

Link | Posted on Dec 18, 2017 at 08:16 UTC as 9th comment
In reply to:

Woodman411: It's easy to see mirrorless overtaking the casual, consumer segment of the market, which is probably the largest market segment. The question is the enthusiast/pro segment, where fast lenses are still relatively large and heavy regardless of body type. Sony is making a case for mirrorless with the a7/a9 series, but attach a fast zoom to it (like the popular 70-200 f/2.8), and there's not much difference in overall size and iq compared to Canikon.

@ T3: sorry for the late reply. I prefer shooting, not posting ;-) But your reply to mine a month ago has some truth, I just remember another example. Originally, the phase AF technology was invented by German engineers from Leitz (Leica). But the management of Leitz decided to leave the patents to Minolta. They thought that pro's and advanced amateurs wouldn't need AF. So, Minolta hit the market wit the first phase AF SLR - and Leitz completely lost the pro market.

That said, face detection is nothing new. My ten years old Canon G7 had that feature already, smartphones have it. But I am sure that many photographers will still want to have full control over which face they want to be in focus.

In the long run we will see light field photography taking over, then you can select focus during post-production. Lytro simply came too early with a too immature technology, like so often in history.

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2017 at 10:44 UTC
In reply to:

Joed700: I think Canon should quit making cameras and focus on their printer technology instead.

If Canikon would fade away we finally would have to rely on Sony's fragile over-engineered toy lenses bending and snapping into halves:
https://www.lensrentals.com/blog/2017/02/lens-teardown-of-the-complicated-sony-fe-70-200mm-f2-8-gm-oss-part-1/
https://www.amazon.com/Sony-70-200mm-Interchangeable-Alpha-Cameras/product-reviews/B00I8BICEO/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_viewpnt_rgt?filterByStar=critical&pageNumber=1

Link | Posted on Jul 22, 2017 at 10:12 UTC
In reply to:

kelstertx: Why are Polaroid pictures always so brown? Perfect example used in article! :)

original color Polaroids weren't brown but had wonderful skin tones. What you see here is Impossible film, its colors are still no match for original Polaroids - but they are improving.

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2017 at 14:09 UTC
In reply to:

Woodman411: It's easy to see mirrorless overtaking the casual, consumer segment of the market, which is probably the largest market segment. The question is the enthusiast/pro segment, where fast lenses are still relatively large and heavy regardless of body type. Sony is making a case for mirrorless with the a7/a9 series, but attach a fast zoom to it (like the popular 70-200 f/2.8), and there's not much difference in overall size and iq compared to Canikon.

@ T3: its great that Sony chases Canikon but please keep in mind that pros are able to track faces by themselves (a good photographer is able to do this). I doubt that they want to leave the decision which face should be in focus just to the camera, even it is made by Sony ;-)

Its not only the camera, its the lenses, the system, so I doubt that pros will quickly switch. But Sony is pushing hardly, and that's finally good news for all users. The old camera makers can't rest on their laurels anymore in 5-years-cycles...

Link | Posted on Jun 14, 2017 at 13:59 UTC
On article Analog gems: 10 excellent, affordable film cameras (820 comments in total)

Recently I realized that my thumb automatically seeks for the winder when I grabbed one of my digital cameras... OMG is this film fever? My current drugs are: new Mamiya 6 MF system (all three lenses are georgous), Canon 7 1960s rangefinder with a set of lenses, 1954 Kodak Retina IIIc (meter still works) - real form follows function stuff, no digital retro fake, such a joy to shoot with, slow food of photography. CLICK!

Link | Posted on May 23, 2017 at 20:18 UTC as 73rd comment
On article Analog gems: 10 excellent, affordable film cameras (820 comments in total)
In reply to:

Cyril Reif: I still have my Olympus XA, as well as my first 35mm, a Kodak Retina IIIc. I also still have my Nikon F Photomic FTn and N70.

The great thing about the Canon 7 is that it is the most modern camera you can get for the old M39 Leica screw mount, so this allows to use vintage lenses. Btw some of Canon's RF lenses for the "7" are very good, quite sharp, nice contrast, so they deliver a modern look.

Link | Posted on May 23, 2017 at 19:55 UTC
On article Analog gems: 10 excellent, affordable film cameras (820 comments in total)
In reply to:

Einride: Nikon FM2 is the best 35mm SLR camera ever made.

At least the FM-2 is a very reliable 35mm SLR. We have three bodys, and my wife took only an FM-2 with her when she was over winter in Siberia. She didn't trust her digital Nikons, and she didn't want to rely on any batteries. Even if the metering of the FM-2 would have been dead she could have worked around that with her experience. But that wasn't necessary, the FM-2 worked flawlessly at -40 °C and below.

Link | Posted on May 23, 2017 at 19:50 UTC
On article Analog gems: 10 excellent, affordable film cameras (820 comments in total)
In reply to:

goblin: DPR, I feel indeed strongly about you spendin I don't know how many pages out of 10 to the FD mount. This is a mount'a been dead'a for 30 years, and is a sign of what's wrong with this article:

- Photography is mostly lenses

- Lenses do age (yes, they do. Even mechanical ones).

- When recommending a system to have fun with - resale value be damned - the FD system is the worst possible. Aside from not being better than the others, it consists mostly of bodies which had a lot of electronics for their time, which is by now failing (the AE-1, specifically, has that beautiful shutter squeak).

Of course, all these concerns can be voided if you had mentioned the correct monster to use with this system: The Canon T-90

- The best film system is the one still made: Nikon still sells film cameras (B&H has them). There are also numerous brand new Vivitar clones (Phoenix, as well as said FM-10) in Nikon mount.

- Voigtlander is still out there, with amazing products.

To be continued :)

SirSeth, are you happy with your FD 500mm f/4.5 L? I have an EF 500mm f/4.5 L USM that is already a vintage lens now, and it is still a great performer.

Link | Posted on May 22, 2017 at 20:02 UTC
On article Analog gems: 10 excellent, affordable film cameras (820 comments in total)

The eye-controlled focus does not work if you wear glasses. I have an EOS 3 and I have given up to try to calibrate it after various attempts. But it's no drawback, you don't really need that feature. Otherwise all better SLRs of those last analogue generation(s) of Canon, Nikon, Minolta, Olympus, Pentax... are very reliable tools (if you get a good copy). In particular the metering is very good. We also have two Nikon F90X in working condition. The only drawback of all those better SLRs are its motor film winders that are quite noisy and really can disturb.

Link | Posted on May 22, 2017 at 19:59 UTC as 116th comment
Total: 190, showing: 1 – 20
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